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I'm working on a small graphics engine using OpenGL and I'm having some issues with my translation matrix. I'm using OpenGL 3.3, GLSL and C++. The situation is this: I have defined a small cube which I want to render on screen. The cube uses it's own coordinate system, so I created a model matrix to be able to transform the cube. To make it myself a bit easier I started out with just a translation matrix as the cube's model matrix and after a bit of coding I've managed to make everything work and the cube appears on the screen. Nothing all to special, but there is one thing about my translation matrix that I find a bit odd.

Now as far as I know, a translation matrix is defined as follows:

1, 0, 0, x
0, 1, 0, y
0, 0, 1, z
0, 0, 0, 1

However, this does not work for me. When I define my translation matrix this way, nothing appears on the screen. It only works when I define my translation matrix like this:

1, 0, 0, 0
0, 1, 0, 0
0, 0, 1, 0
x, y, z, 1

Now I've been over my code several times to find out why this is the case, but I can't seem to find out why or am I just wrong and does a translation matrix needs to be defined like the transposed one here above?

My matrices are defined as a one-dimensional array going from left to right, top to bottom.

Here is some of my code that might help:

//this is called just before cube is being rendered
void DisplayObject::updateMatrices()
{
    modelMatrix = identityMatrix();
    modelMatrix = modelMatrix * translateMatrix( xPos, yPos, zPos );

    /* update modelview-projection matrix */
    mvpMatrix = modelMatrix * (*projMatrix);
}

//this creates my translation matrix which causes the cube to disappear
const Matrix4 translateMatrix( float x, float y, float z )
{
    Matrix4 tranMatrix = identityMatrix();

    tranMatrix.data[3]  = x;
    tranMatrix.data[7]  = y;
    tranMatrix.data[11] = z;

    return Matrix4(tranMatrix);
}

This is my simple test vertex shader:

#version 150 core

in vec3 vPos;

uniform mat4 mvpMatrix;

void main()
{
    gl_Position = mvpMatrix * vec4(vPos, 1.0);
}

I've also did tests to check if my matrix multiplication works and it does. I * randomMatrix is still just randomMatrix

I hope you guys can help. Thanks

EDIT:

This is how I send the matrix data to OpenGL:

void DisplayObject::render()
{
    updateMatrices();

    glBindVertexArray(vaoID);
    glUseProgram(progID);
    glUniformMatrix4fv( glGetUniformLocation(progID, "mvpMatrix"), 1, GL_FALSE, &mvpMatrix.data[0] );
    glDrawElements(GL_TRIANGLES, bufferSize[index], GL_UNSIGNED_INT, 0);
}

mvpMatrix.data is a std::vector:

share|improve this question
1  
Your code doesn't actually show any interaction with OpenGL, does it? How do you feed the matrix to OpenGL? –  David Grayson Nov 8 '12 at 16:40
    
Is there a reason you aren't using glTranslatef? –  Eric B Nov 8 '12 at 16:42
1  
I also think G_G is right, your translation matrix should be pre-multiplied, not post-multiplied –  Eric B Nov 8 '12 at 16:44
    
@DavidGrayson I've edited my post with OpenGL calls –  Krienie Nov 8 '12 at 16:47
    
@EricB glTranslateF is deprecated in OpenGL 3.3 as far as I know, so I try to avoid that as much as possible and I'm also not sure how that would work with shaders? –  Krienie Nov 8 '12 at 16:53

2 Answers 2

up vote 12 down vote accepted

For OpenGL

1, 0, 0, 0
0, 1, 0, 0
0, 0, 1, 0
x, y, z, 1

Is the correct Translation Matrix. Why? Opengl Uses column-major matrix ordering. Which is the Transpose of the Matrix you initially presented, which is in row-major ordering. Row major is used in most math text-books and also DirectX, so it is a common point of confusion for those new to OpenGL.

See: http://www.mindcontrol.org/~hplus/graphics/matrix-layout.html

share|improve this answer
2  
Well that explains a lot then. Thanks a lot :) After a few minutes of searching for opengl and column-major ordering I also found this link, which tells the same thing. [opengl.org/archives/resources/faq/technical/transformations.htm –  Krienie Nov 8 '12 at 17:31
1  
That is the one! I was looking for that page in a bit of a rush and didn't find it, but still wanted to back up my claim! –  Stephan van den Heuvel Nov 8 '12 at 17:46
    
Your diagram is misleading and incorrect. The translation matrix would look the same regardless of language, and yours is not that matrix. Instead, just read matrices top-to-bottom, not left to right, in OpenGL, when array notation is involved. –  Jessy Nov 9 '12 at 18:24
3  
I am sorry if it is misleading. My diagram is supposed to represent the translation matrix as it must sit in memory. Read as if it were an array declaration. I can make that more clear if that would help :) The concept of row-major and column-major matrices are not made up. It actually depends if you are using vectors that are 4x1 or 1x4 as this changes the way the matrix would need to be written. –  Stephan van den Heuvel Nov 9 '12 at 19:06
2  
You do know that matrices can be written both ways though, right? It depends on if you are using column vectors versus row vectors. Column vectors are more prevalent now, but both representations have ben used extensively and are mathematically valid. I am not 'perverting' anything, as both notations have been used for many years ... the notation for memory being left to right top to bottom is an artifact of how most languages declare arrays. Like int c[] = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8]; –  Stephan van den Heuvel Nov 12 '12 at 19:41

You cannot swap matrices in a matrix multiplication, so A*B is different from B*A. You have to transpose B before swapping the matrices.

A * B = t(B) * A

try

void DisplayObject::updateMatrices()
{
    modelMatrix = identityMatrix();
    modelMatrix = translateMatrix( xPos, yPos, zPos ) * modelMatrix;

    /* update modelview-projection matrix */
    mvpMatrix = modelMatrix * (*projMatrix);
}
share|improve this answer
    
You are right about the swapping, but that shouldn't matter if I multiply the translation matrix with the identity matrix, which I do. And to be sure: I've tested it and it doesn't work. Still no joy :( –  Krienie Nov 8 '12 at 16:51

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