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I have real message classes eg

class Specific1Message {
   //various functions to get different types of data
};

class Specific2Message {
   //various functions to get different types of data
};

which I cannot change.

I am re-writing a software tool which encodes and decodes these messages. It decides which messages to decode/encode at runtime.

A load of specific messages get retrieved from a text file to be replayed to mimic a real system. The messages are temporarily stored in a std::list. To make the new/delete lifecycle more robust I have been asked to use smart pointers.

My first idea on the messages was to do something like this :-

class proto_msg : public ref_type {
 public:


}

//ref_type is a smart pointer class

class Specific1msg : public proto_msg {
   public:


  Specific1Message m_msg;  //instance of specific 1 message - composition
};

But I have functions in my tool which takes a proto_msg* as a parameter. So I was thinking that to get to the Specific1Message (for example) I would just do this:

int SpecificMessageHandler::EncodeMsg(proto_msg* msg, unsigned char* buffer, int size)

But then how to retrieve a Specific1Message? msg->GetMsg() - but how to define this method? What would it return?

I would need to define GetMsg() in the base class. But what is the return type? That is what I can't fathom? Or maybe I need a rethink.

EDIT Thank you for all the responses. I learnt about multiple dispatch amongst other things.

In the end I decided to do it like this :-

class realproto {
public:
   const char* getName() const { return "realproto"; }
}; 

class real2ndproto {
public:
   const char* get2Name() const { return "real2ndproto"; }
}; 


template<typename T>
class ProtoWrapper : public ref_type {
public:
   ProtoWrapper(T* real) : m_msg(real) {}
   ~ProtoWrapper() { delete m_msg; }  //cannot have smart ptr on real_proto - so do this way

   T* getMsg() { return m_msg; }

private:
   T* m_msg;
};

Then call like this

  ref_ptr<ProtoWrapper <realproto> > msg2 = new ProtoWrapper<realproto>(new realproto);

  realproto* pr1 = msg2->getMsg(); //if need underlying protocol

This should hopefully allow me to remove the void* s with the least code changes required.

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Are the messages really not derived from anything else? –  John Dibling Nov 8 '12 at 17:21
    
Specific1Message etc are different classes for different protocols often written by different people. So no, not derived from any base class. –  arcomber Nov 8 '12 at 17:22
    
Then you are unfortunately pretty well screwed. –  John Dibling Nov 8 '12 at 17:23
    
Use a dummyclass as return value, containing a mem chunk for the generic case or return derived class for your well-known cases. That solution is not optimal, but well... –  drahnr Nov 8 '12 at 17:23
2  
What do you want to do with your messages? You've been asked to store them in a list using smart pointers as if they are generic although the structure of the messages indicates that they have no relationship at all. Are you hoping to carry out generic operations on them or treat them as idiosyncratic? –  Component 10 Nov 8 '12 at 17:24
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2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The only options I can think of is template + double dispatching

class proto_msg : public  ref_type{
   public:
      virtual int call_encode (SpecificMessageHandler*, unsigned char* buffer, int size) = 0;
};

template <class M>
class SpecificMesssageTpl : public  proto_msg
 {
   public:
      int call_encode (SpecificMessageHandler* handler, unsigned char* buffer, int size)
      {
          return handler->EncodeMsgSpecific (m_msg, buffer, size);
      }

private:
  M m_msg;  //instance of specific 1 message - composition
};


class SpecificMessageHandler
{
public:
    int SpecificMessageHandler::EncodeMsg(proto_msg* msg, unsigned char* buffer, int size)
   {
        return msg->call_encoder (this, buffer, size);
   }

   int SpecificMessageHandler::EncodeMsgSpecific(Specific1Message * msg, unsigned char* buffer, int size)
   {
    // encode Specific1Message 
   }

   int SpecificMessageHandler::EncodeMsgSpecific(Specific2Message * msg, unsigned char* buffer, int size)
   {
     // encode Specific2Message 
   }
};
share|improve this answer
    
I tried this approach and it worked. I also read up on multiple dispatch. Interesting. Must spend more time on that. I will not use but will mark as answered as it was helpful. –  arcomber Nov 9 '12 at 13:17
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There aren't a whole load of clean, simple ways to do this. But there are a few possibilities, if you're willing to compromise on mildly inelegant code.

Well, how about proto_msg be updated like this:

class proto_msg : public ref_type
{
public:
    virtual int message_type() = 0;
}

And subclasses of it updated like this:

class Specific1msg : public proto_msg
{
public:
    static const int message_id = 1;
    virtual int message_type() { return message_id; }
    Specific1Message m_msg;  //instance of specific 1 message - composition
};

And then you could use an if statement to choose a handler:

// proto_msg a_message;

if (a_message.message_type() == Specific1msg::message_id)
{
    Specific1msg specific_message = (Specific1msg)a_message;
    // do something with specific_message.msg
}

In fact, C++ does support some simple introspection capabilities in the form of Run Time Type Information, or RTTI. This does not necessarily get compiled into your binary by default; it may require additional compiler flags (-frtti in GNU land). RTTI lets you use dynamic_cast to perform a typecast operation where failures can be handled gracefully.

// proto_msg* a_message

Specific1Message* specific_message = dynamic_cast<Specific1Msg*>(a_message));

if (message != nullptr)
{
    // Do something with specific_message.msg
}

And so on. There are many other ways to do this, and I think on the whole I prefer Aleguna's double dispatching template magic, but this mechanism should be pretty straightfoward and simple for anyone to grasp!

Code untested, uncompiled, E&OE, etc ;-)

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