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I have to display ratings and for that i need increments as follows:

If the number is 1.0 it should be equal to 1
If the number is 1.1 should be equal to 1
If the number is 1.2 should be equal to 1
If the number is 1.3 should be equal to 1.5
If the number is 1.4 should be equal to 1.5
If the number is 1.5 should be equal to 1.5
If the number is 1.6 should be equal to 1.5
If the number is 1.7 should be equal to 1.5
If the number is 1.8 should be equal to 2.0
If the number is 1.9 should be equal to 2.0
If the number is 2.0 should be equal to 2.0
If the number is 2.1 should be equal to 2.0
and so on...

Is there a simple way to compute the required values?

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up vote 106 down vote accepted

Multiply your rating by 2, then round using Math.Round(rating, MidpointRounding.AwayFromZero), then divide that value by 2.

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2  
bah, if only i typed faster, lol – Neil N Aug 25 '09 at 16:46
6  
3  
I dont need typing for dummies, I need typing for smarties – Neil N Aug 25 '09 at 17:10
2  
Not perfect! what about integer overflow! You can compute only half of the possible integers. – Elazar Leibovich Aug 25 '09 at 18:18
3  
Divide first, then multiply. This will eliminate the overflow problem, and also allow you to round to an arbitrary number. – Benjol Mar 28 '13 at 7:57

Multiply by 2, round, then divide by 2

if you want nearest quarter, multiply by 4, divide by 4, etc

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3  
Simple and perfect. This is exactly what I was looking for. Thanks! – Michael Jun 1 '12 at 17:41
    
Know you shouldn't post this type of comments, but hey, this is great! – Chris Andersson Aug 29 '14 at 10:46

Here are a couple of methods I wrote that will always round up or down to any value.

public static Double RoundUpToNearest(Double passednumber, Double roundto)
{
    // 105.5 up to nearest 1 = 106
    // 105.5 up to nearest 10 = 110
    // 105.5 up to nearest 7 = 112
    // 105.5 up to nearest 100 = 200
    // 105.5 up to nearest 0.2 = 105.6
    // 105.5 up to nearest 0.3 = 105.6

    //if no rounto then just pass original number back
    if (roundto == 0)
    {
        return passednumber;
    }
    else
    {
        return Math.Ceiling(passednumber / roundto) * roundto;
    }
}

public static Double RoundDownToNearest(Double passednumber, Double roundto)
{
    // 105.5 down to nearest 1 = 105
    // 105.5 down to nearest 10 = 100
    // 105.5 down to nearest 7 = 105
    // 105.5 down to nearest 100 = 100
    // 105.5 down to nearest 0.2 = 105.4
    // 105.5 down to nearest 0.3 = 105.3

    //if no rounto then just pass original number back
    if (roundto == 0)
    {
        return passednumber;
    }
    else
    {
        return Math.Floor(passednumber / roundto) * roundto;
    }
}
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decimal d = // your number..

decimal t = d - Math.Floor(d);
if(t >= 0.3d && t <= 0.7d)
{
    return Math.Floor(d) + 0.5d;
}
else if(t>0.7d)
    return Math.Ceil(d);
return Math.Floor(d);
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Sounds like you need to round to the nearest 0.5. I see no version of round in the C# API that does this (one version takes a number of decimal digits to round to, which isn't the same thing).

Assuming you only have to deal with integer numbers of tenths, it's sufficient to calculate round (num * 2) / 2. If you're using arbitrarily precise decimals, it gets trickier. Let's hope you don't.

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There are several options. If performance is a concern, test them to see which works fastest in a large loop.

double Adjust(double input)
{
    double whole = Math.Truncate(input);
    double remainder = input - whole;
    if (remainder < 0.3)
    {
        remainder = 0;
    }
    else if (remainder < 0.8)
    {
        remainder = 0.5;
    }
    else
    {
        remainder = 1;
    }
    return whole + remainder;
}
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This should work, but it just isn't as elegant as some solutions given. Multiplying and using the system library is just sexy. – captncraig Aug 25 '09 at 16:45
    
Performance is usually more important, and this could end up taking less time than the multiplication and division solutions. – John Fisher Aug 25 '09 at 17:57
2  
This code is not correct. Since arithmetic with doubles usually has some small rounding errors, an operation such as 4.8 - 4.0 could give for example 0.799999... . In this case the code above would round to 4.5. Also better would to use Math.Floor instead of Math.Truncate, because right now negative numbers are not corretly rounded. I prefer the accepted answer,because it is simpler and less prone to implementation errors. – Accipitridae Aug 25 '09 at 19:46

The Correct way to do this is:

  public static Decimal GetPrice(Decimal price)
            {
                var DecPrice = price / 50;
                var roundedPrice = Math.Round(DecPrice, MidpointRounding.AwayFromZero);
                var finalPrice = roundedPrice * 50;

                return finalPrice;

            }
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I had difficulty with this problem as well. I code mainly in Actionscript 3.0 which is base coding for the Adobe Flash Platform, but there are simularities in the Languages:

The solution I came up with is the following:

//Code for Rounding to the nearest 0.05
var r:Number = Math.random() * 10;  // NUMBER - Input Your Number here
var n:int = r * 10;   // INTEGER - Shift Decimal 2 places to right
var f:int = Math.round(r * 10 - n) * 5;// INTEGER - Test 1 or 0 then convert to 5
var d:Number = (n + (f / 10)) / 10; //  NUMBER - Re-assemble the number

trace("ORG No: " + r);
trace("NEW No: " + d);

Thats pretty much it. Note the use of 'Numbers' and 'Integers' and the way they are processed.

Good Luck!

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