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I am assuming that the function already has a return value so that cannot be added.

What I came up with to solve this problem is to add extra pointer parameters which default to nullptr.

Before:

bool fun(double a, std::vector<std::randomexample> const & b)

After:

bool fun(double a, std::vector<std::randomexample> const & b, int* extraoutput = nullptr)

and use it like this

if(extraoutput)
  *extraoutput = whatever;

But that's just what I came up with. I would like to know if there is a better way to do this. Note that "whatever" is already in the function.

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1  
Seems reasonable. –  Pete Becker Nov 8 '12 at 17:32
1  
If you absolutely don't want to change the existing thing, create a new overloaded one. –  Anirudh Ramanathan Nov 8 '12 at 17:34

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

If for some reason you need binary as well as (mostly) source compatibility[*]:

Before:

bool fun(double a, std::vector<std::randomexample> const & b) {
    // do stuff
    return true;
}

After:

bool fun(double a, std::vector<std::randomexample> const & b, int* extraoutput) {
    // do stuff
    if(extraoutput)
        *extraoutput = whatever;
    return true;
}
bool fun(double a, std::vector<std::randomexample> const & b) {
    return fun(a, b, nullptr);
}

If you don't want function overloading (for example if fun is part of an extern "C" interface), then you don't actually have to call the new function fun. It could just as well be fun2.

[*] As AndreyT points out, the source compatibility of your solution is limited. Calls to your old function will call your new function fine, but some other things that you might do with the old function will not work fine (since you have changed its type).

There's actually a source incompatibility in my code too. void(*foo)() = (void(*)()) fun; is allowed before the overload is added, but afterwards it's ambiguous. If you want to support code that does that, then that's a second reason not to want function overloading.

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Why did the type of the old function change? I mean, the old function now just calls the new function so the contents seem to have changed but I don't see why the type changed. –  Sarien Nov 8 '12 at 17:47
    
@Corporal: the type of your function bool fun(double a, Foo const & b) is bool(double, Foo const &). The type of your function bool fun(double a, Foo const & b, int* extraoutput = nullptr) is bool(double, Foo const &, int*). The two are not the same. In my code, there is still a function with type bool(double, Foo const &) in addition to the new function, so code that relies on the old type is OK. –  Steve Jessop Nov 8 '12 at 17:48
    
Ah, okay, so it's not actually a problem in your solution but in mine. Sorry, got confused. :) –  Sarien Nov 8 '12 at 17:58
    
@CorporalTouchy: yep, and in your solution if someone does call the function through a function pointer variable then they don't just have to change the type of the variable, they also have to explicitly supply a value for the third parameter. Basically the calling code needs to "know" the default value, it's not a property of the function and the function pointer doesn't know it. But if people only ever call your function by name then it'll be OK. –  Steve Jessop Nov 8 '12 at 18:01

Normally, I add a method with the extra parameter, and call that one with a default value from the former method:

//foo v1
void foo( S s ) {
   ... stuff with s;
};

//codeA_v1:
S s;
foo(s);

//codeB_v1
S s2;
foo(s2);

Then, I add a method with an extra parameter:

void foo(S s){ foo(s, default_value_for_T); }
void foo(S s, T t){
   ... stuff with s and t
}

//codeA_v1 == codeA_v2
S s;
foo(s);

//codeB_v2
S s;
T t;
foo(s,t);
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This is an extended comment. As alredy suggested by the others, you'd better overload the function in order to provide both source and binary compatibility. The reason to do so is that by introducing a change in the function signature, you also change the mangled symbol name, e.g. from _Z3fundRKSt6vectorISt13randomexampleSaIS0_EE to _Z3fundRKSt6vectorISt13randomexampleSaIS0_EEPi. This would break binary compatibility with all other objects that call fun() by its old mangled name. If fun() is part of a dynamically linked library, it will break all existing binaries that link against it since the dynamic linker would no longer be able to resolve the _Z3fundRKSt6vectorISt13randomexampleSaIS0_EE symbol reference. If you go with the overloaded function version, the old mangled symbol would still exist and binary compatibility would be retained.

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As stated by others, this will be your final product.

bool fun(double a, std::vector<std::randomexample> const & b){
    return fun(a,b,0);
}
bool fun(double a, std::vector<std::randomexample> const & b, int* extraoutput = 0){
    // have fun!
    if(extraoutput) *extraoutput = whatever;
    return true;
}
share|improve this answer
    
why the default argument? –  xtofl Nov 8 '12 at 17:41
1  
In that case you have to remove the default argument, since otherwise calls with 2 arguments will become ambiguous. –  AndreyT Nov 8 '12 at 17:41
    
Maybe it would be good idea to just create that extraoutput in the new function and pass it as reference. Might be able to save some copying and the call won't be ambiguous anymore. –  Sarien Nov 8 '12 at 17:51

You can try to implement genernic Observer pattern. Here is a like: http://sourcemaking.com/design_patterns/observer

It will be better for the future when you will want to add more parameters. If you cant derive then passing as a parameter will be solution too.

As i understand you have to do it in this function, otherwise yes overload is a good solution.

It doesnt break a binary compability otherwise to other solution.

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1  
Is this really relevant to the current case? –  Anirudh Ramanathan Nov 8 '12 at 17:36
    
More generic solution is always a case, i think for the future when more parameters can come into the game. –  CyberGuy Nov 8 '12 at 17:37
    
@Cthulhu: it could be. Add one optional new parameter now, that currently has an observewhatever function. When the same thing happens again, you don't have to add another optional pointer parameter to the function, you can instead add another function to the observer. –  Steve Jessop Nov 8 '12 at 17:38
    
I don't think this is a good application of the observer pattern. IMHO callbacks make everything much more complicated. –  Sarien Nov 8 '12 at 17:39
    
I care about binary compability for the future. Please remember broken compability can be really costful. –  CyberGuy Nov 8 '12 at 17:47

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