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I'm using ggplot and have two graphs that I want to display on top of each other. I used grid.arrange from gridExtra to stack them. The problem is I want the left edges of the graphs to align as well as the right edges regardless of axis labels. (the problem arises because the labels of one graph are short while the other is long).

The Question:
How can I do this? I am not married to grid.arrange but the ggplot2 is a must.

What I've tried:
I tried playing with widths and heights as well as ncol and nrow to make a 2 x 2 grid and place the visuals in opposite corners and then play with the widths but I couldn't get the visuals in opposite corners.

require(ggplot2);require(gridExtra)
A <- ggplot(CO2, aes(x=Plant)) + geom_bar() +coord_flip() 
B <- ggplot(CO2, aes(x=Type)) + geom_bar() +coord_flip() 
grid.arrange(A, B, ncol=1)

enter image description here

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1  
Here are two possible options: here and here. –  joran Nov 8 '12 at 18:18
    
@Joran I'm looking for the left axes to be aligned. I don't think these will do it. I'd like to be wrong though. –  Tyler Rinker Nov 8 '12 at 18:27

5 Answers 5

up vote 45 down vote accepted
+50

Try this,

 gA <- ggplotGrob(A)
 gB <- ggplotGrob(B)
 maxWidth = grid::unit.pmax(gA$widths[2:5], gB$widths[2:5])
 gA$widths[2:5] <- as.list(maxWidth)
 gB$widths[2:5] <- as.list(maxWidth)
 grid.arrange(gA, gB, ncol=1)

Edit

Here's an alternative solution using a modified version of gtable:::rbind_gtable and cbind_gtable, for an arbitrary number of plots.

rbind_gtable_max <- function(...){

  gtl <- list(...)
  stopifnot(all(sapply(gtl, is.gtable)))
  bind2 <- function (x, y) 
  {
    stopifnot(ncol(x) == ncol(y))
    if (nrow(x) == 0) 
      return(y)
    if (nrow(y) == 0) 
      return(x)
    y$layout$t <- y$layout$t + nrow(x)
    y$layout$b <- y$layout$b + nrow(x)
    x$layout <- rbind(x$layout, y$layout)
    x$heights <- gtable:::insert.unit(x$heights, y$heights)
    x$rownames <- c(x$rownames, y$rownames)
    x$widths <- grid::unit.pmax(x$widths, y$widths)
    x$grobs <- append(x$grobs, y$grobs)
    x
  }

  Reduce(bind2, gtl)
}

cbind_gtable_max <- function(...){

  gtl <- list(...)
  stopifnot(all(sapply(gtl, is.gtable)))
  bind2 <- function (x, y) 
  {
    stopifnot(nrow(x) == nrow(y))
    if (ncol(x) == 0) 
      return(y)
    if (ncol(y) == 0) 
      return(x)
    y$layout$l <- y$layout$l + ncol(x)
    y$layout$r <- y$layout$r + ncol(x)
    x$layout <- rbind(x$layout, y$layout)
    x$widths <- gtable:::insert.unit(x$widths, y$widths)
    x$colnames <- c(x$colnames, y$colnames)
    x$heights <- grid::unit.pmax(x$heights, y$heights)
    x$grobs <- append(x$grobs, y$grobs)
    x
  }
  Reduce(bind2, gtl)
}

grid.draw(rbind_gtable_max(gA, gB))

(note that the modification is only needed only because gtable currently fails to compare some types of compound units with unit.pmax)

share|improve this answer
2  
Beautiful and really pretty straight forward. Thank you for the solution. –  Tyler Rinker Nov 8 '12 at 21:37
1  
Perfect solution! I've been looking for something like this to align multiple separate time-series plots that I can't do with faceting because of the major customization in each plot. –  wahalulu Jan 20 '13 at 17:47
    
Would you be so kind as to provide what would be the way to match the heigh if we have two columns? gA$heights[2:3] does not seem to work. Do I have to select another element of the grob than 2:3? Thank you! –  Etienne Low-Décarie Jun 28 '13 at 16:23
    
I was surprised to see that length(gA$heights)!=length(gA$widths) –  Etienne Low-Décarie Jun 28 '13 at 16:51
    
why would the two be equal? A plot has a title, legend, strips, etc. besides the plot panel and axes, and the gtable layout has widths/heights for those elements. –  baptiste Jun 28 '13 at 16:54

I wanted to generalize this for any number of plots. Here is a step-by-step solution using the approach by Baptiste:

plots <- list(A, B, C, D)
grobs <- list()
widths <- list()

collect the widths for each grob of each plot

for (i in 1:length(plots)){
    grobs[[i]] <- ggplotGrob(plots[[i]])
    widths[[i]] <- grobs[[i]]$widths[2:5]
}

use do.call to get the max width

maxwidth <- do.call(grid::unit.pmax, widths)

asign the max width to each grob

for (i in 1:length(grobs)){
     grobs[[i]]$widths[2:5] <- as.list(maxwidth)
}

plot

do.call("grid.arrange", c(grobs, ncol = 1))
share|improve this answer
    
This has been so useful to me - I wish I could give it another +1 –  alexwhan Jan 16 at 4:14
    
Awesome. This is indeed very helpful. –  Jdbaba Jan 23 at 3:14

Here is another possible solution using melt from the reshape2 package, and facet_wrap:

library(ggplot2)
library(reshape2)

dat = CO2[, c(1, 2)]
dat$id = seq(nrow(dat))
mdat = melt(dat, id.vars="id")

head(mdat)
#   id variable value
# 1  1    Plant   Qn1
# 2  2    Plant   Qn1
# 3  3    Plant   Qn1
# 4  4    Plant   Qn1
# 5  5    Plant   Qn1
# 6  6    Plant   Qn1

plot_1 = ggplot(mdat, aes(x=value)) + 
         geom_bar() + 
         coord_flip() +
         facet_wrap(~ variable, nrow=2, scales="free", drop=TRUE)

ggsave(plot=plot_1, filename="plot_1.png", height=4, width=6)

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
    
This solution assumes you have equal number of rows in each column. In my MRWE that's true but not in reality. –  Tyler Rinker Nov 8 '12 at 21:36
    
I'm not sure I understand: Do you mean that CO2$Plant and CO2$Type happen to be the same length, but that your actual data isn't like that? –  bdemarest Nov 8 '12 at 21:54
    
It's two different data sets that shares one variable so number of rows is not the same. –  Tyler Rinker Nov 8 '12 at 22:56

On http://rpubs.com/MarkusLoew/13295 is a really easy solution available (last item) Applied to this problem:

require(ggplot2);require(gridExtra)
A <- ggplot(CO2, aes(x=Plant)) + geom_bar() +coord_flip() 
B <- ggplot(CO2, aes(x=Type)) + geom_bar() +coord_flip() 
grid.draw(rbind(ggplotGrob(A), ggplotGrob(B), size="first"))

you can also use this for both width and height:

require(ggplot2);require(gridExtra)
A <- ggplot(CO2, aes(x=Plant)) + geom_bar() +coord_flip() 
B <- ggplot(CO2, aes(x=Type)) + geom_bar() +coord_flip() 
C <- ggplot(CO2, aes(x=conc)) + geom_bar() +coord_flip()
D <- ggplot(CO2, aes(x=uptake)) + geom_bar() +coord_flip() 
grid.draw(cbind(
            rbind(ggplotGrob(A), ggplotGrob(B), size="first"),
            rbind(ggplotGrob(C), ggplotGrob(D), size="first"),
            size='first'))
share|improve this answer
    
using size="first" means that the alignment won't look very good if the second plot is bigger than the first –  baptiste Nov 5 at 16:28

At best this is a hack:

library(wq)
layOut(list(A, 1, 2:16),  list(B, 2:3, 1:16))

It feels really wrong though.

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