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I was wondering if there was a better alternative then using this break implementation. I'm trying to improve my abilities and the following does indeed work. Its just that i keep hearing about Break; as being the easy way out and produces potential spaghetti code which hasn't happened here but still.

public void getWoodSoldRecently(){
    Calendar cal = Calendar.getInstance();
    cal.add(Calendar.WEEK_OF_YEAR, -2);
    for(Tree t : theTrees){
        if(t.getSimpleDateSold().getTime().after(cal.getTime()) && t.getHasBeenSold()==true){
            treesSold.add(t);
            System.out.println(t.getTreeId() + " " + t.getTreeType());
        }
        else{
            System.out.println("Nothing sold in the last 2 weeks");
            break; //Stop the above
        }
    }
}

Without the break the "Nothing sold in the last 2 weeks" would output the amount stored in the array.

share|improve this question
    
Can you post links to where people are being critical of break? –  Paul Bellora Nov 8 '12 at 18:04
    
What's with the Trees? And why do you want to stop processing the rest of the Trees if one hasn't been sold? –  cHao Nov 8 '12 at 18:05
    
The loop stops at the first tree which don't satisfy the test "date in the last 2 weeks and Sold". Are you sure? –  Aubin Nov 8 '12 at 18:05
1  
well if his trees are sorted by date, then maybe he can safely assume that once one has not been found, no others will satisfy the condition. –  Eric B Nov 8 '12 at 18:07
3  
@Melky: Those arguments against break were mostly made by rabidly anti-goto zealots who see any non-if, non-loop control statement (particularly break and continue, and any return before the end of a function, and in some cases even throw) as "goto in disguise", ignoring the fact that all flow control statements are just wrappers around goto. Consider them the crackpots they are, and don't pay them too much attention. If break does exactly what you need it to, then use it. –  cHao Nov 8 '12 at 18:11

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Since you arent doing anything after the break, if it occours. You might aswell replace it with return.

public void getWoodSoldRecently(){
Calendar cal = Calendar.getInstance();
cal.add(Calendar.WEEK_OF_YEAR, -2);
for(Tree t : theTrees){
    if(t.getSimpleDateSold().getTime().after(cal.getTime()) && t.getHasBeenSold()==true){
        treesSold.add(t);
        System.out.println(t.getTreeId() + " " + t.getTreeType());
    }
    else{
        System.out.println("Nothing sold in the last 2 weeks");
        return; //Exit function
    }
}

}

I personally have no broblem with breaks, however return forces you to encapsulate code into more functions, wich is always good.

share|improve this answer

I suspect you don't actually want to break here anyway. Surely you want to just keep going with the rest of the trees - just because you find one tree which doesn't match your condition (e.g. it's not been sold), does that really mean there can't be any matching ones later in your collection?

Your method is distinctly strange anyway, in terms of being a get method which doesn't return anything, but adds values to an existing collection. That's the first thing I'd change.

share|improve this answer
    
You are indeed correct about this, I do actually have an if statement that does what you say but didn't include it here. I haven't gotten used to naming conventions just yet and based my get method on if it has outputted and gathering data. –  Melky Nov 8 '12 at 18:25
1  
@Melky: It's hard to give you advice on one situation when you only show a different one. There's no way of telling what I (or any other answerer) would do with your real code, based only on this non-representative code. –  Jon Skeet Nov 8 '12 at 23:50

Break is not bad by definition-it can be misused but the way you are using it is allowed. You can considered replacing the break with a return.

share|improve this answer

I don't this using break in your example will result into any issue. Still posting one possible workaround(avoid break):

   boolean bContinue = true;
   int iSize = theTrees.size();
   for(int indx=0; indx < iSize && bContinue; indx++){
    Tree t  = theTrees.get(indx);
    if(t.getSimpleDateSold().getTime().after(cal.getTime()) 
        && t.getHasBeenSold()==true){
        treesSold.add(t);
        System.out.println(t.getTreeId() + " " + t.getTreeType());
    }
    else{
        System.out.println("Nothing sold in the last 2 weeks");
        bContinue = false;//This will stop the loop
    }
}
share|improve this answer

The problem is that you're using a foreach loop that doesn't enable you to use conditional parameters. If you convert it into a for loop you'll be better off:

boolean loopContinue = true;

for(int i = 0; i < theTrees.size() && loopContinue; i++) {
        Tree t = theTrees.get(i);
        if(t.getSimpleDateSold().getTime().after(cal.getTime()) && t.getHasBeenSold()==true){
            treesSold.add(t);
            System.out.println(t.getTreeId() + " " + t.getTreeType());
        }
        else{
            System.out.println("Nothing sold in the last 2 weeks");
            loopContinue = false; //Stop the above
        }
    }
}

EDIT & Clarification: I say "better off" meaning you'll have more control of your loop. As others have said using break isn't inherently bad.

share|improve this answer
    
I prefer the break version over this, definitely. –  Jon Skeet Nov 8 '12 at 18:07
    
This is even worse than break -- now you have a magic variable. –  cHao Nov 8 '12 at 18:07
    
Yes you do, but I'm answering his question as it was posted. He was looking for alternatives. The variable is included simply for readability while you could completely write it to not include the if statement's conditional in the for loop. –  TheCapn Nov 8 '12 at 18:08

Work with an Iterator:

public void getWoodSoldRecently(){
Calendar cal = Calendar.getInstance();
cal.add(Calendar.WEEK_OF_YEAR, -2);
Iterator itr = theTrees.iterator();
boolen b = true;
while (itr.hasNext() && b == true) {
        if(t.getSimpleDateSold().getTime().after(cal.getTime()) && t.getHasBeenSold()==true){
            treesSold.add(t);
            System.out.println(t.getTreeId() + " " + t.getTreeType());
        }
        else{
            System.out.println("Nothing sold in the last 2 weeks");
            b = false;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Magic variables are far worse than break, IMO. At least when i see a break, i know i'm jumping elsewhere. –  cHao Nov 8 '12 at 18:17
    
you are probably right, furthermore in this case you need two more variables. But the question was how to avoid the break. An this is one example. –  Martin Grohmann Nov 8 '12 at 18:34

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