Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I've managed to stump myself with LINQ. I am trying to create an editable datagrid in a WPF app using a subset gathered from a LINQ query:

var LookUpEvents = from d in ThisData.Events.Local
                   where d.StartDate.Value.Date <= DateTime.Now.Date &&
                   (d.EndDate.HasValue == false || d.EndDate.Value.Date >= DateTime.Now.Date)
                   select d;
RangeEventGrid.ItemsSource = LookUpEvents;
RangeEventGrid.Items.Refresh();

This query works, and the datagrid is populated however I am unable to edit the datagrid, when trying to this exception is thrown:

"'EditItem' is not allowed for this view."
   at System.Windows.Controls.ItemCollection.System.ComponentModel.IEditableCollectionView.EditItem(Object item)
   at System.Windows.Controls.DataGrid.EditRowItem(Object rowItem)

When loading the full dataset using:

ThisData.Events.Load();
FullEventGrid.ItemsSource = ThisData.Events.Local;

Everything works fine and the data is editable. The XAML used is identical (I have also tried swapping the bound datagrids and the full result remains editable and the query throws the exception still) and the only difference between these is the query. When I try to change the query I end up with a new exception:

The specified type member 'Date' is not supported in LINQ to Entities. Only initializers, entity members, and entity navigation properties are supported.

The query used for that:

var LookUpEvents = from d in ThisData.Events
                   where d.StartDate.Value.Date <= DateTime.Now.Date &&
                   (d.EndDate.HasValue == false || d.EndDate.Value.Date >= DateTime.Now.Date)
                   select d;
LookUpEvents.Load(); //Exception thrown here.
RangeEventGrid.ItemsSource = LookUpEvents;
RangeEventGrid.Items.Refresh();

The really weird thing about that exception (weird to me at least) is that I use DateTime comparison in other queries that do not throw any exceptions, for example this query in another place works fine:

var LookUpSessions = from d in ThisData.Sessions
                     where d.EndTime.Hour >= (DateTime.Now.Hour - 1) && d.StartTime.Hour <= (DateTime.Now.Hour + 2)
                     && d.Event.IsActive == true
                     orderby d.StartTime.Hour, d.StartTime.Minute
                     select d;

Is it not possible to bind a LINQ query result to a DataGrid to be editable? That seems like it'd be a huge oversight if that's the case. I feel like it's much more likely I'm just missing something basic since LINQ, WPF and EF are all brand new to me.

Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
up vote 4 down vote accepted

To make editing data in the GridView possible you cannot use an IEnumerable<T> or IQueryable<T> as the items source. You need a collection type that implemnts IList and IEnumerable<T> or IQueryable<T> don't.

A possible solution is that you create an ObservableCollection<T> (that does implement IList) from your LINQ query:

RangeEventGrid.ItemsSource = new ObservableCollection<Event>(LookUpEvents);

This is also the reason why

FullEventGrid.ItemsSource = ThisData.Events.Local;

does work because Local is already of type ObservableCollection<Event>.

Your very first query doesn't throw an exception (although you are using DateTime.Date) because it is not a LINQ-to-Entities/database query. It is a LINQ-to-Objects query that runs in memory on the Local collection. There is no database query involved.

If you remove Local you run LINQ-to-Entities and LINQ-to-Entities doesn't support all methods and properties that LINQ-to-Objects does, especially it doesn't support DateTime.Date (but apparently is does support DateTime.Hour).

To perform the comparison by Date in a LINQ-to-Entities query you can use EntityFunctions:

var today = DateTime.Now.Date;
var LookUpEvents = from d in ThisData.Events
                   where EntityFunction.TruncateTime(d.StartDate) <= today &&
                         (!d.EndDate.HasValue ||
                          EntityFunction.TruncateTime(d.EndDate) >= today)
                   select d;

Or maybe the EntityFunction.DiffDays function is an option as well.

share|improve this answer
    
This explains a lot about why using .ToList() worked for me. I didn't understand that .local was changing what the LINQ was being performed against. Thank you for this great explanation. – siva.k Nov 8 '12 at 22:29
    
@mr.smors: Yes, right, List<T> works too. ObservableCollection<T> is sometimes more useful in WPF because it supports change notifications for adding items to the collection and removing items from it. That's why Local is implemented as ObservableCollection<T>; the change notifications are catched to update the state of entities in the context (put entities into Added and Deleted state). But you destroy this feature when you compose further LINQ queries to Local, it only work when you bind Local directly to the grid. – Slauma Nov 8 '12 at 22:49
    
this really works for me. thx. i vote your answer. – Alfred Angkasa Mar 14 '13 at 12:22

And problem solved!

Added .ToList() to the binding and it works!

Full Working LINQ query:

var LookUpEvents = from d in ThisData.Events.Local
                   where d.StartDate.Value.Date <= DateTime.Now.Date &&
                   (d.EndDate.HasValue == false || d.EndDate.Value.Date >= DateTime.Now.Date)
                   select d;

// Old binding: RangeEventGrid.ItemsSource = LookUpEvents;
// New binding:
RangeEventGrid.ItemsSource = LookUpEvents.ToList(); // .ToList() Fixes it!
RangeEventGrid.Items.Refresh();

Self answer in honor of http://xkcd.com/979/

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.