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I have a problem which I narrowed down to the following code:

class A
{
};

class B : private A
{
};

void f(A*)
{
}

void f(void*)
{
}

int main()
{
  B b;
  f(&b);
}

Which gives the following error with gcc 4.7:

error: ‘A’ is an inaccessible base of ‘B’

I know that A is inaccessible but I would have liked the compiler to call f(void*). Is this behavior normal or am I doing something wrong? Or maybe it's a compiler bug?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Overloading is resolved before access checking. So the compiler chooses f(A*) as the appropriate overload, then determines that &b can't be converted to A* and gives the error message.

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As for the reason why this is so: because it causes such error. So if you want to prevent people from calling f(void*) accidentally, you now know how, and if they still do want to call it, they can just cast f(static_cast<void*>(&b));. –  Matthieu M. Nov 8 '12 at 19:07
    
I see, that makes sense, though I'm a bit disappointed by it. –  Philippe Nov 8 '12 at 19:11

You need to make sure that b is being passed in as a void *, which won't be the default case since b is actually an instance of A. Just explicitly tell f() that b is void * by casting it:

class A {
};

class B : private A {
};

void f(A*) {
}

void f(void*) {
}

int main() {
  B b;
  f((void*)&b);
}
share|improve this answer
    
This would indeed solve the problem, but in my case, I don't have access to the f call, I can only change the class A and B. –  Philippe Nov 8 '12 at 19:01

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