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Let's say I have an object with two different one-to-many relations. Much like:

Customer 1<->M Brands and Customer 1<->M Orders

And let's say that the my object Customer has two lists related to those two objects.

I've read this example: http://forum.springsource.org/showthread.php?50617-rowmapper-with-one-to-many-query which explains how to do it with a single one-to-many relationship. For your convenience here's the ResultSetExtractor override:

private class MyObjectExtractor implements ResultSetExtractor{

    public Object extractData(ResultSet rs) throws SQLException, DataAccessException {
        Map<Integer, MyObject> map = new HashMap<Integer, MyObject>();
        MyObject myObject = null;
        while (rs.next()) {
            Integer id = rs.getInt("ID);
            myObject = map.get(id);
          if(myObject == null){
              String description = rs,getString("Description");
              myObject = new MyObject(id, description);
              map.put(id, myObject);
          }
      MyFoo foo = new MyFoo(rs.getString("Foo"), rs.getString("Bar"));
      myObject.add(myFoo);
        }
        return new ArrayList<MyObject>(map.values());;
    }
}

I don't think it covers how to work with both. What would be the cleanest approach? Is there a simpler way than to iterate with conditions? Would sets be better off than lists in this case?

share|improve this question
    
what structure does your table have? – soulcheck Nov 22 '12 at 14:29
    
it's a weird structure, this is an inherited proyect. There are no explicit relations which forced me to move to jdbc as opposed to a standard ORM. But there are user-defined relations aka a customer could have many orders, a customer could have many brands. So for example if i used hibernate, i would have my object Customer with 2 lists as properties and would annotate them as one to many, but since i'm using a straight up query and joins I'm thinking it would take two different queries to populate a list of object Customer, because otherwise it would return a jumbled resultset. – Nimchip Nov 23 '12 at 16:12
    
nono, just tell what tables and columns you have in this case and also if there is a funcional mapping from brands to orders and vice versa or are they totally independent – soulcheck Nov 23 '12 at 16:47
    
well customer has a lot of columns (and I really mean that), and has both a customer_id and a customer_account_number. Those are the ones i use to join with orders and brands respectively, though they aren't marked as FKs in the DB so the relationship is not explicitly defined. Yes it's a cluster-f of a db, but i have no way around that. – Nimchip Nov 23 '12 at 19:19
    
There is no relationship between brands and orders. These are independent. – Nimchip Nov 23 '12 at 19:20
up vote 14 down vote accepted
+50

From your question, I assume that you have three tables; Customer, Brands, Orders. If you want to fetch the Brands and Orders properties of the Customer to your customer object, where there is no relationship between Brands and Orders, what I suggest is to use a UNION query. Something like this:

TBL_CUSTOMER
------------
CUSTOMER_ID
CUSTOMER_ACCOUNT_NO
CUSTOMER_NAME

TBL_CUSTOMER_BRANDS
-------------------
CUSTOMER_BRAND_ID            - UK
BRAND_NAME
CUSTOMER_ID                  - FK

TBL_ORDERS
-------------------
ORDER_ID                     - UK
CUSTOMER_ID                  - FK

Query:

SELECT CUS.*, BRANDS.CUSTOMER_BRAND_ID COL_A, BRANDS.BRAND_NAME COL_B, 1 IS_BRAND FROM TBL_CUSTOMER CUS JOIN TBL_CUSTOMER_BRANDS BRANDS ON (CUS.CUSTOMER_ID = BRANDS.CUSTOMER_ID)
UNION ALL
SELECT CUS.*, ORDERS.ORDER_ID, '', 0 IS_BRAND FROM TBL_CUSTOMER CUS JOIN TBL_ORDERS ORDERS ON (CUS.CUSTOMER_ID = ORDERS.CUSTOMER_ID)

Your ResultSetExtractor will become:

private class MyObjectExtractor implements ResultSetExtractor{

    public Object extractData(ResultSet rs) throws SQLException, DataAccessException {
            Map<Long, Customer> map = new HashMap<Long, Customer>();

        while (rs.next()) {
            Long id = rs.getLong("CUSTOMER_ID");
            Customer customer = map.get(id);
            if(customer == null){
                customer = new Customer();
                customer.setId(id);
                customer.setName(rs.getString("CUSTOMER_NAME"));
                customer.setAccountNumber(rs.getLong("CUSTOMER_ACCOUNT_NO"));
                map.put(id, customer);
                    }

            int type = rs.getInt("IS_BRAND");
            if(type == 1) {
                List brandList = customer.getBrands();
                if(brandsList == null) {
                    brandsList = new ArrayList<Brand>();
                    customer.setBrands(brandsList);
                }
                Brand brand = new Brand();
                brand.setId(rs.getLong("COL_A"));
                brand.setName(rs.getString("COL_B"));
                brandsList.add(brand);
            } else if(type == 0) {
                List ordersList = customer.getOrders();
                if(ordersList == null) {
                    ordersList = new ArrayList<Order>();
                    customer.setOrders(ordersList);
                }
                Order order = new Order();
                order.setId(rs.getLong("COL_A"));
                ordersList.add(order);
            }
        }
        return new ArrayList<Customer>(map.values());
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
This is what I understood from the question. Still I wonder why not to separate the queries and resultset extractors. It would make them much more comprehensible. – tkr Nov 27 '12 at 13:01
    
Thank you, this is precisely what i was looking for. I forgot all about Unions working with ORMs and decently normalized tables. – Nimchip Nov 27 '12 at 15:45
    
@tkr what do you mean by separating them? – Nimchip Nov 27 '12 at 15:48
    
It is a little bit big for a comment, see my answer below. Please be aware, that I do not have an IDE here, so probabaly the code contains some errors. I also used RowCallbackHandler as suggested by Vasyl as it removes the necessarity of calling rs.next() and returning an object. – tkr Nov 28 '12 at 7:05
    
A bit of recommendation here from a immutable objects fan. Instead of checking if brandList is null every time -> create a all field constructor in the Customer class and initialize the brandList there. Also I'd prefer to initialize my Customer object using constructor instead setting each field separately (personal preference). – Anton Belev Jan 25 at 18:54

I think there is no better way than to iterate over all rows, extract the two different objects and add it to a List<Brand> and List<Order> within the Customer object.

So you would end up in a customer object:

public class Customer {
     private List<Brand> brands;
     private List<Order> orders;
....
}

There was an issue on SpringSource regarding a mutliple rowmapper: https://jira.springsource.org/browse/SPR-7698

but there's only one comment linking to a one-to-many resultset extractor: https://github.com/SpringSource/spring-data-jdbc-ext/blob/master/spring-data-jdbc-core/src/main/java/org/springframework/data/jdbc/core/OneToManyResultSetExtractor.java

I think you're doing it right if you really need eager fetching. If you'd need lazy fetching you could load the respective orders and brands on access during runtime. That's how Hibernate and other ORM frameworks do it. It depends on your scenario and what you do with the object.

share|improve this answer

I assume the model described by James Jithin in his answer:

TBL_CUSTOMER
------------
CUSTOMER_ID
CUSTOMER_ACCOUNT_NO
CUSTOMER_NAME

TBL_CUSTOMER_BRANDS
-------------------
CUSTOMER_BRAND_ID            - UK
BRAND_NAME
CUSTOMER_ID                  - FK

TBL_ORDERS
-------------------
ORDER_ID                     - UK
CUSTOMER_ID                  - FK

Instead of going for one Query, I would suggest the following three:

SELECT CUS.* FROM TBL_CUSTOMER CUS 

SELECT BRANDS.CUSTOMER_ID, BRANDS.CUSTOMER_BRAND_ID, BRANDS.BRAND_NAME FROM TBL_CUSTOMER_BRANDS BRANDS

SELECT ORDERS.CUSTOMER_ID, ORDERS.ORDER_ID FROM TBL_ORDERS ORDERS 

Your RowCallbackHandlers would become:

private class CustomerRowCallbackHandler  implements RowCallbackHandler {

    private final Map<Long, Customer> customerMap;

    public BrandRowCallbackHandler(Map<Long, Customer> customerMap) { this.customerMap = customerMap}

    public void processRow(ResultSet rs) throws SQLException {
            Long id = rs.getLong("CUSTOMER_ID");
            Customer customer = map.get(id);
            if(customer == null){
                customer = new Customer();
                customer.setId(id);
                customer.setName(rs.getString("CUSTOMER_NAME"));
                customer.setAccountNumber(rs.getLong("CUSTOMER_ACCOUNT_NO"));
                map.put(id, customer);
                    }
    }
}

private class BrandRowCallbackHandler implements RowCallbackHandler {

    private final Map<Long, Customer> customerMap;

    public BrandRowCallbackHandler(Map<Long, Customer> customerMap) { this.customerMap = customerMap}

    public void processRow(ResultSet rs) throws SQLException {
            Long id = rs.getLong("CUSTOMER_ID");
            Customer customer = map.get(id);
            if(customer != null){
                List brandList = customer.getBrands();
                if(brandsList == null) {
                    brandsList = new ArrayList<Brand>();
                    customer.setBrands(brandsList);
                }
                Brand brand = new Brand();
                brand.setId(rs.getLong("CUSTOMER_BRAND_ID"));
                brand.setName(rs.getString("CUSTOMER_BRAND_NAME"));
                brandsList.add(brand);
            } 
    }
}

private class OrderRowCallbackHandler implements RowCallbackHandler {

    private final Map<Long, Customer> customerMap;

    public OrderRowCallbackHandler(Map<Long, Customer> customerMap) { this.customerMap = customerMap}

    public void processRow(ResultSet rs) throws SQLException {
            Long id = rs.getLong("CUSTOMER_ID");
            Customer customer = map.get(id);
            if(customer != null){
                List ordersList = customer.getOrders();
                if(ordersList == null) {
                    ordersList = new ArrayList<Order>();
                    customer.setOrders(ordersList);
                }
                Order order = new Order();
                order.setId(rs.getLong("ORDER_ID"));
                ordersList.add(order);
            }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

If I really had to do it, I would prefer RowCallbackHandler over ResultSetExtractor. See RowCallbackHandler api and JDBCTemplate api.

In this case you need to collect the resulting Customers collection yourself in the handler. Sets can help to filter out duplicates.

share|improve this answer

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