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Okay, I have a function in my controller that works. However, I shouldn't be calling the database in the controller (as we all know). I normally can easily migrate information from a model into a controller, but I'm having a hard time with this one. I won't even share my model version...how would you write this to a model?

    $this -> db -> select('title, price, number_sites, number_entries, white_label'); 
    $query = $this -> db -> get('pricing', 3); // limit 3 rows

    $row1 = $query->row(0); // 0 grabs first row in table: Package 1        
    $data['row1'] = $row1;

    $row2 = $query->row(1); // 1 grabs second row in table: Package 2        
    $data['row2'] = $row2;

    $row3 = $query->row(2); // 2 grabs third row in table: Package 3        
    $data['row3'] = $row3;
share|improve this question
    
Exactly like you write it for a controller...but in a model. Everything it's well explained in the manual –  Damien Pirsy Nov 8 '12 at 19:35
    
Wouldn't this bit need to be in the controller? Since it's using a $data array - that's attached to a view... $row1 = $query->row(0); // 0 grabs first row in table: Package 1 $data['row1'] = $row1; –  Mike Barwick Nov 8 '12 at 19:37
    
WHo said that $data is "attached to a view"? You can name variables however you like and wherever you like. Read the manual, but cum grano salis , don't take it so pedantically ;) –  Damien Pirsy Nov 8 '12 at 19:39

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Just copy and paste it into the model in a function you want to call:

function dbstuff(){
    $this -> db -> select('title, price, number_sites, number_entries, white_label'); 
    $query = $this -> db -> get('pricing', 3); // limit 3 rows

    $row1 = $query->row(0); // 0 grabs first row in table: Package 1        
    $data['row1'] = $row1;

    $row2 = $query->row(1); // 1 grabs second row in table: Package 2        
    $data['row2'] = $row2;

    $row3 = $query->row(2); // 2 grabs third row in table: Package 3        
    $data['row3'] = $row3;
    return $data;
}

Then in your controller:

$this->load->model('MyModel');
$data=$this->MyModel->dbstuff();
$this->load->view('view',$data);
share|improve this answer
    
Works...but prevents other $data variables I'm sending to the view...any idea to the cause of this? –  Mike Barwick Nov 8 '12 at 19:59
    
try merging the existing data variables with array_merge: $data=array_merge($data,$this->MyModel->dbstuff()); –  Tim Withers Nov 8 '12 at 20:10
1  
What would this be doing exactly? Is $data=array_merge($data,$this->MyModel->dbstuff()); the same as $data=$this->MyModel->dbstuff(); but adds to existing $data variables? –  Mike Barwick Nov 8 '12 at 21:01
    
Yup. Combines the array returned from the model to the existing data array. –  Tim Withers Nov 8 '12 at 21:08
    
Gotya! Understood! Thanks so much for your help! –  Mike Barwick Nov 8 '12 at 21:12

I would suggest you to create a model class that includes an static method for wrapping the query to select from the database and returns the instances of the model class.

For example:

class MyModelClass {

// Your class code here

static function findByPricing($price){

    $output = array();

   //run your query here using your db handler

   foreach($resultingrows as $row){

       $object = new MyModelClass();
       $object->setAttributeOne($row['attribute_one');
       $object->setAttributeTwo($row['attribute_two');
       $object->setAttributeThree($row['attribute_three');

       $output[] = $object;

   }

   return $output;

}


}

Then from your controller just do:

 $objects = MyModelClass::findByPricing(3);
share|improve this answer
    
Why this approach? Why not just $this->load->model('myodel'); $this->mymodel->method(), as it's usually and regularly done in CI? –  Damien Pirsy Nov 8 '12 at 19:45
    
This is an object oriented approach, for me is cleaner. Notice that you have to call more than one line of code to load "$this->load->model('myodel'); $this->mymodel->method()". With my approach you only call one line and that line will do everything "from loading the model, run the query and returns the model instances". I think is more cleaner, elegant, readable and flexible. Is an object oriented approach. –  slash28cu Nov 8 '12 at 19:49
    
Well, even the one I suggested is an "object oriented approach", and is the one used by CI throughout the whole framework; also, your model doesn't extends the parent CI_Model, so won't have access to the CI superobject. Do you regularly write model like this when using codeigniter? –  Damien Pirsy Nov 8 '12 at 19:52
    
Ok, i agree with you. Is just a matter of taste. I prefer to go with my approach for the reasons i explained on the previous comment. –  slash28cu Nov 8 '12 at 19:53
    
I got you now. The thing is that you are thinking in the code-igniter way. Well if you are using that framework you can keep your approach just to be consistent with the framework. But personally i prefer mine, is the way zend works. But, yes for consistency purposes is ok. –  slash28cu Nov 8 '12 at 19:56

It is always a good idea to consult the documentation first.

User Guide for Models

Once you have the information for writing model classes, create one and put this function in it.

public function getPricing(){
  return  $this -> db -> select('title, price, number_sites, number_entries, white_label') -> get('pricing', 3) -> result_array();
}
share|improve this answer
    
I know how to write models dude...you didn't get my question. ;) –  Mike Barwick Nov 8 '12 at 20:59

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