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Here is the situation:

I got a database which record the relationship between CUSTOMER and ORDER, INVOICE, PAYMENT etc.

My current design is: CUSTOMER links to ORDER, ORDER links to INVOICE, and INVOICE links to PAYMENT.

My question is, I actually want to know which CUSTOMER is dealing with the ORDER, the INVOICE and the PAYMENT. So do I have to put the CUSTOMER_ID in every table which I want to show the CUSTOMER in as a FK? Will it

Or I can just present it by query?

share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

No, you don't. You should just write a query with multiple joins, if you aim to follow proper database design and avoid redundant data storage.

E.g.:

SELECT c.CUSTOMER_ID, ..., p.PAYMENT_ID, ...
FROM CUSTOMER c,ORDER o,INVOICE i,PAYMENT p
WHERE c.CUSTOMER_ID = o.CUSTOMER_ID
and o.ORDER_ID = i.ORDER_ID
and i.INVOICE_ID = p.INVOICE_ID 
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, absolutely. It can be helpful to performance to create indexes that cover both join columns where a table is being "traversed" by a query in this way. For example, an index on order.order_id and order.customer_id, as it avoids the need to access the table for a query such as this. – David Aldridge Nov 8 '12 at 19:48
1  
I agree with your answer but that's a real bad way to join your tables. But I don't agree with your example you should be using join keywords INNER JOIN LEFT OUTER JON etc. Something like this select * from customer as c inner join order as o on c.customer_id = o.customer_id inner join invoice as i etc – Chris Moutray Nov 8 '12 at 19:49
    
it does the same thing. i prefer to use = then 'inner join' because the syntax is more minimalist – amphibient Nov 8 '12 at 19:51
1  
It's better to explicitly show your intent, always think about the people who are going to maintain your code later... – Maess Nov 8 '12 at 19:55
    
To be fair I don't think it effects the execution plan but personally it's difficult to read and less obvious what the query is trying to do . – Chris Moutray Nov 8 '12 at 19:56

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