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Grateful for any insight into what I'm misunderstanding here. My requirement is as follows:

I have an array of URLs. I want to fire off an AJAX request for each URL simultaneously, and as soon as the first request completes, call the first callback. Then, if and when the second request completes, call that callback, and so on.

Option 1:

for (var i = 0; i < myUrlArray.length; i++) {
    $.ajax({
        url: myUrlArray[i]
    }).done(function(response) {
        // Do something with response
    });
}

Obviously this doesn't work, as there is no guarantee the responses will complete in the correct order.

Option 2:

var promises = [];
for (var i = 0; i < myUrlArray.length; i++) {
    promises.push($.ajax({
        url: myUrlArray[i]
    }));
}
$.when.apply($, promises).then(function() {
    // Do something with each response
});

This should work, but the downside is that it waits until all AJAX requests have completed, before firing any of the callbacks.

Ideally, I should be able to call the first callback as soon as it's complete, then chain the second callback to execute whenever that response is received (or immediately if it's already resolved), then the third, and so on.

The array length is completely variable and could contain any number of requests at any given time, so just hard coding the callback chain isn't an option.

My attempt:

var promises = [];
for (var i = 0; i < myUrlArray.length; i++) {
    promises.push($.ajax({
        url: myUrlArray[i] // Add each AJAX Deferred to the promises array
    }));
}
(function handleAJAX() {
    var promise;
    if (promises.length) {
        promise = promises.shift(); // Grab the first one in the stack
        promise.then(function(response) { // Set up 'done' callback
            // Do something with response

            if (promises.length) {
                handleAJAX(); // Move onto the next one
            }
        });
    }
}());

The problem is that the callbacks execute in a completely random order! For example, if I add 'home.html', 'page2.html', 'page3.html' to the array, the order of responses won't necessarily be 'home.html', 'page2.html', 'page3.html'.

I'm obviously fundamentally misunderstanding something about the way promises work. Any help gratefully appreciated!

Cheers

EDIT

OK, now I'm even more confused. I made this JSFiddle with one array using Alnitak's answer and another using JoeFletch's answer and neither of them work as I would expect! Can anyone see what is going on here?

EDIT 2

Got it working! Based on JoeFletch's answer below, I adapted the solution as follows:

var i, responseArr = [];

for (i = 0; i < myUrlArray.length; i++) {
    responseArr.push('0'); // <-- Add 'unprocessed' flag for each pending request
    (function(ii) {
        $.ajax({
            url: myUrlArray[ii]
        }).done(function(response) {
            responseArr[ii] = response; // <-- Store response in array
        }).fail(function(xhr, status, error) {
            responseArr[ii] = 'ERROR';
        }).always(function(response) {
            for (var iii = 0; iii < responseArr.length; iii++) { // <-- Loop through entire response array from the beginning
                if (responseArr[iii] === '0') {
                    return; // As soon as we hit an 'unprocessed' request, exit loop
                }
                else if (responseArr[iii] !== 'done') {
                    $('#target').append(responseArr[iii]); // <-- Do actual callback DOM append stuff
                    responseArr[iii] = 'done'; // <-- Set 'complete' flag for this request
                }
            }
        });
    }(i)); // <-- pass current value of i into closure to encapsulate
}

TL;DR: I don't understand jQuery promises, got it working without them. :)

share|improve this question
    
Is the callback for each request the same? –  JoeFletch Nov 8 '12 at 19:57
    
Pretty much, it just parses the returned HTML for a specific element corresponding to the URL requested and inserts it into the DOM. –  Chris Francis Nov 8 '12 at 19:59
    
is it possible in this case to use the async:false option? –  logic8 Nov 8 '12 at 20:22
    
@logic8 Unfortunately not, as the requests can take quite some time to complete and the UI needs to remain responsive throughout. –  Chris Francis Nov 8 '12 at 20:25
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Here's my attempt at solving this. I updated my answer to include error handling for a failed .ajax call. I also moved some code to the complete method of the .ajax call.

var urlArr = ["url1", "url2"];
var responseArr = [];
for(var i = 0; i < length; i++) {
    responseArr.push("0");//0 meaning unprocessed to the DOM
}

$.each(urlArr, function(i, url){
    $.ajax({
        url: url,
        success: function(data){
            responseArr[i] = data;
        },
        error: function (xhr, status, error) {
            responseArr[i] = "Failed Response";//enter whatever you want to place here to notify the end user
        },
        complete: function() {
           $.each(responseArr, function(i, element){
                if (responseArr[i] == "0") {
                    return;
                }
                else if (responseArr[i] != "done")
                {
                    //do something with the response
                    responseArr[i] = "done";
                }
            });
        }
    });
})
share|improve this answer
    
Ah ok, so you're caching each response inside an array, iterating over that response array every time you get a response, and exiting whenever you encounter a 0 (incomplete response)... Nice! That's a really interesting way of approaching it! –  Chris Francis Nov 8 '12 at 20:21
    
Thanks. I updated my answer to include error handling for a response if it fails and I moved some code to the complete method, that way it gets executed at the end of every .ajax call. –  JoeFletch Nov 8 '12 at 20:28
    
OK, I got it working eventually! I adapted your method (i wasn't passed in a closure so was always on the last value when the callback came around); see my edit at the end of the question. Thanks again for helping me think about this a different way! –  Chris Francis Nov 9 '12 at 15:15
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Don't forget that you don't need to register the callbacks straight away.

I think this would work, the main difference with your code being that I've used .done rather than .then and refactored a few lines.

var promises = myUrlArray.map(function(url) {
    return $.ajax({url: url});
});

(function serialize() {
    var def = promises.shift();
    if (def) {
        def.done(function() {
            callback.apply(null, arguments);
            serialize();
        });
    }
})();
share|improve this answer
    
Interesting.. that should work. +1 –  Kevin B Nov 8 '12 at 20:07
    
Woah... firstly, awesome refactor with using .map(). So what would be the difference in using done() instead of then()? As far as I understood it, there wouldn't really be a difference if I wasn't using the return value of the callback in a subsequent promise. –  Chris Francis Nov 8 '12 at 20:14
    
Having tried this in my code, it still appears to be executing in a random order. Saying that, I think I need to create a reduced test case as there may well be other forces at play... –  Chris Francis Nov 8 '12 at 20:23
1  
@ChrisFrancis to be fair, I wrote this without realising how close it was to what you had already tried. There's really no way it should be able to execute in random order because the callback on the next promise doesn't even get registered until the current one is finished. –  Alnitak Nov 8 '12 at 20:42
    
Yeah I think I've got a bug somewhere else that's throwing me off. Just creating a fiddle now, will post here shortly. –  Chris Francis Nov 8 '12 at 20:51
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Asynchronous requests aren't guaranteed to finish in the same order that they are sent. some may take longer than others depending on server load and the amount of data being transferred.

The only options are either to wait until they are all done, only send one at a time, or just deal with them being called possibly out of order.

share|improve this answer
3  
with deferred objects it should be perfectly possible to make the callbacks for each async request run in the required order, even though the requests themselves will not. –  Alnitak Nov 8 '12 at 20:45
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