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A Google search turned up software that performs the same functions as cron, but nothing built into Windows.

I'm running Windows XP Professional, but advice for any version of Windows would be potentially helpful to someone.

EDIT: Is there also a way to invoke this feature (which based on answers is called the Task Scheduler) programatically or via the command line?

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2  
What feature of cron do you need that Task Scheduler doesn't provide? –  Chris Jester-Young Sep 25 '08 at 12:24
4  
voted to move to SF –  Paul Nathan May 17 '10 at 20:30

12 Answers 12

up vote 147 down vote accepted

Windows Task Scheduler

For command-line usage, you can schedule with the at command. I'll add the schtasks command which is the replacement in newer MS OS.

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Windows "AT" command is very similar to cron.

Edit: The AT command is available through the command line (Clarification on additions to question)

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The link that you provided also directed me to the SCHTASKS command. –  Thomas Owens Sep 25 '08 at 12:27

The 'at' command.

"The AT command schedules commands and programs to run on a computer at a specified time and date. The Schedule service must be running to use the AT command."

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pycron is close match on windows

http://www.kalab.com/freeware/pycron/pycron.htm

The following entries are supported:

1   Minute (0-59)
2   Hour (2-24)
3   Day of month (1-31)
4   Month (1-12, Jan, Feb, etc)
5   Day of week (0-6) 0 = Sunday, 1 = Monday etc or Sun, Mon, etc)
6   User that the command will run as
7   Command to execute
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Is there also a way to invoke this feature (which based on answers is called the Task Scheduler) programatically [...]?

Task scheduler API on MSDN.

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The closest equivalent are the Windows Scheduled Tasks (Control Panel -> Scheduled Tasks), though they are a far, far cry from Cron. The biggest difference (to me) is that they require a user to be logged into the windows box, and a user account (with password and all), which makes things a nightmare if your local security policy requires password changes periodically. I also think it is less flexible than cron as far as setting intervals for items to run.

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If you prefer good ol' cron, CRONw is the way to go.

Supported systems

* Windows 2000 (any version)    works
* Windows XP (SP 2)             works
* Windows Server 2003           works
* Windows NT 4 (SP 6)           should work but not tested
* Windows 3.11, Windows 95,
  Windows 98, Windows ME,
  Windows XP beneath SP2        not supported by design
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4  
Doesn't work for modern versions of Windows. –  chaostheory Apr 20 '11 at 18:59
    
good point, updated. –  enobrev Nov 28 '11 at 22:16

Use the windows task scheduler to schedule tasks over time and dates.

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Not exactly a Windows version, however you can use Cygwin's crontab. For install instructions, see here: here.

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1  
This answer contains linkrot, but the StackOverflow question How do you run a crontab in Cygwin on Windows? is helpful. –  Michael Scheper Apr 26 '13 at 2:06

There is NNCron for windows, that can schedule jobs to be run periodically.

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In addition to Windows Task Scheduler you also have 'at' on Windows. I'm not sure how it differs from Task Scheduler besides the fact that it has a command line interface.

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Zcron?

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