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I had a specific use case in mind but was not able to figure out the right data structure to use.

I have one thread which keeps streaming objects into a HashMap. Something similar to market data where you have a high and unknown frequency of ticks.

Another thread which constantly reads this map for updated Price objects and queries by key in no particular order. The queries may be multiple times for the same key in a given cycle. The reads and writes are very frequent but the read thread is only interested in the latest available data that is fully updated and doesn't necessarily block till write is complete.

I wanted your thoughts on an ideal data structure for such use cases. Are there better implementations than ConcurrentHashMap that is available?

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
will the hashmap be modified (i.e. will there be puts and removes) while the tick data is updated? or will the mappings be set up before the data starts coming in? –  Måns Rolandi Nov 8 '12 at 20:45
    
yes there will be lots of puts but no removes. Basically on each tick that arrives, I would do a put(key,Price). On the other hand, I could also prepopulate the hashMap with some dummy objects, since I know the keys before hand. –  trequartista Nov 8 '12 at 20:57
    
What is the key? The stock? –  Tom Anderson Nov 8 '12 at 22:28
    
yes key is a stock. –  trequartista Nov 9 '12 at 1:52

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

One approach would be a copy-on-write scheme, something like this:

public class Prices {
    private volatile Map<String, Integer> prices = Collections.emptyMap();

    public void putPrice(String ticker, int price) {
        HashMap<String, Integer> newPrices = new HashMap<String, Integer>(prices);
        newPrices.put(ticker, price);
        prices = newPrices;
    }

    public Integer getPrice(String ticker) {
        return prices.get(ticker);
    }
}

This has a minimal overhead for gets - one read from a volatile, and then a normal hash lookup. However, it has a substantial overhead for puts - the creation of a whole new map, plus a write to a volatile. If your ratio of reads to writes was high, this might still be a good tradeoff.

You can improve this by only mutating the map when you actually need to add a new entry, rather than updating an existing one; you can achieve that by using mutable values:

public class Prices {
    private volatile Map<String, AtomicInteger> prices = Collections.emptyMap();

    public void putPrice(String ticker, int price) {
        AtomicInteger priceHolder = prices.get(ticker);
        if (priceHolder != null) {
            priceHolder.set(price);
        }
        else {
            HashMap<String, AtomicInteger> newPrices = new HashMap<String, AtomicInteger>(prices);
            newPrices.put(ticker, new AtomicInteger(price));
            prices = newPrices;
        }
    }

    public Integer getPrice(String ticker) {
        AtomicInteger priceHolder = prices.get(ticker);
        if (priceHolder != null) return priceHolder.get();
        else return null;
    }
}

I'm not sure what the performance characteristics of an AtomicInteger are; it's possible this is slower than it looks. Assuming AtomicInteger is not unreasonably slow, this should be pretty fast - it involves two reads from a volatile plus a normal hash lookup for each get, and a read from a volatile, a hash lookup, and a single write to a volatile for updates to existing prices. It still involves duplicating the map for addition of new prices. However, in a typical market, that doesn't happen often.

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ConcurrentHashMap. From Javadoc

A hash table supporting full concurrency of retrievals and adjustable expected concurrency for updates. This class obeys the same functional specification as Hashtable, and includes versions of methods corresponding to each method of Hashtable. However, even though all operations are thread-safe, retrieval operations do not entail locking, and there is not any support for locking the entire table in a way that prevents all access. This class is fully interoperable with Hashtable in programs that rely on its thread safety but not on its synchronization details.

Retrieval operations (including get) generally do not block, so may overlap with update operations (including put and remove). Retrievals reflect the results of the most recently completed update operations holding upon their onset. For aggregate operations such as putAll and clear, concurrent retrievals may reflect insertion or removal of only some entries. Similarly, Iterators and Enumerations return elements reflecting the state of the hash table at some point at or since the creation of the iterator/enumeration.

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If the map is not modified (that is, no puts or removes) while the data is being updated, you do not even need a synchronized map like ConcurrentHashMap. If there are puts and removes continually during the program execution, you need to synchronize these calls. However, even a ConcurrentHashMap starts throwing ConcurrentModificationExceptions all around when the update frequency gets to high (in a multithread program that is). What frequency is too high? You may have to measure that yourself, it depends on a lot of factors in your platform.

What I do in these situations, I try to create a situation where I do not have to insert or remove from the map during program execution, only on startup and shutdown when the data stream has been stopped. If that is not possible, I use a combination of a normal HashMap and the excellent data structure CopyOnWriteArrayList, and synchronize externally. I have not tested the limits of the ConcurrentHashMap, but I would not trust it for my own production systems.

EDIT: ConcurrentHashMap do NOT cause any ConcurrentModificationExceptions, only if you use the Collections.synchronizedMap you may get in trouble.

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Can you please explain what kind of exceptions are thrown around and in what situations by ConcurrentHashMap for high update frequency –  Pangea Nov 8 '12 at 20:51
    
@Pangea edited to answer your question a bit more –  Måns Rolandi Nov 8 '12 at 21:00
    
I have used CopyOnWriteArrayList as well where appropriate. my question is about your statement "However, even a ConcurrentHashMap starts throwing ConcurrentModificationExceptions all around when the update frequency gets to high " –  Pangea Nov 8 '12 at 21:04
    
If you are specifically thinking about ConcurrentModificationException then ConcurrentMap will never throw that exception. –  Pangea Nov 8 '12 at 21:08
1  
this is a nice article if you haven't already seen it: ibm.com/developerworks/java/library/j-jtp07233/index.html –  Måns Rolandi Nov 8 '12 at 21:17

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