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I am working on a project and have to compare two files and see if they match eachother excatly.

My first draft before alot of error checking and validation came up with:

  DirectoryInfo di = new DirectoryInfo(Environment.CurrentDirectory + "\\TestArea\\");
  FileInfo[] files = di.GetFiles(filename + ".*");

  FileInfo outputFile = files.Where(f => f.Extension == ".out").Single<FileInfo>();
  FileInfo expectedFile = files.Where(f => f.Extension == ".exp").Single <FileInfo>();

  using (StreamReader outFile = new StreamReader(outputFile.OpenRead()))
  {
    using (StreamReader expFile = new StreamReader(expectedFile.OpenRead()))
    {
      while (!(outFile.EndOfStream || expFile.EndOfStream))
      {
        if (outFile.ReadLine() != expFile.ReadLine())
        {
          return false;
        }
      }
      return (outFile.EndOfStream && expFile.EndOfStream);
    }
  }

It seems a little odd to have nested using statements.

Is there a better way to do this?

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2  
if one of the files is shorter than the other but matches all it's bytes with the larger file the above code will return true eventhough the files are not an exact match –  Rune FS Aug 25 '09 at 19:38
    
@Rune FS: Good catch, fixed –  SBurris Aug 31 '09 at 2:06
    
I think I may have found a syntactically cleaner way of declaring this using statement, and it appears to work for me? using var as your type in the using statement instead of IDisposable seems to allow me to instantiate both of my objects and call their properties and methods of the class they are allocated with, as in using(var uow = UnitOfWorkType1(), uow2 = UnitOfWorkType2()){} –  Caleb Feb 21 at 15:58

15 Answers 15

up vote 190 down vote accepted

The preferred way to do this is to only put an opening brace { after the last using statement, like this:

using (StreamReader outFile = new StreamReader(outputFile.OpenRead()))
using (StreamReader expFile = new StreamReader(expectedFile.OpenRead())) 
{
    ///...
}
share|improve this answer
7  
Cleaner? and also doesn't force you to use the same types.. I always do it this way even if the types match for readability and consistency. –  meandmycode Aug 25 '09 at 17:49
3  
even if your going to trim out the brackets, for sake of convention I recommend you keep the indent on the nested portion –  Hardryv Aug 25 '09 at 18:24
5  
@Hardryv: Visual Studio's auto-format removes it. The idea is to look like a list of variable declarations. –  SLaks Aug 25 '09 at 20:00
10  
Not sure if I find that more readable at all. If anything it breaks the look of nested code. And it looks as if the first using statement is empty and unused. But, I guess what ever works... :/ –  Jonathon Watney Aug 25 '09 at 20:07
6  
@Bryan Watts, the "contrarians" may be expressing real preferences. It's very likely that a different group of devs would've dissented had nesting been recommended. The only way to know is to run the experiment again in a parallel universe. –  Yar Aug 16 '11 at 23:37

If the objects are of the same type you can do the following

    using (StreamReader outFile = new StreamReader(outputFile.OpenRead()), 
                      expFile = new StreamReader(expectedFile.OpenRead())) {
        ...
    }
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1  
Well they are all the same type if they are all IDisposable perhaps a cast would work? –  jpierson Jan 17 '12 at 17:43
2  
@jpierson that does work, yes, but then when you're calling the IDisposable objects from inside the using block, we can't call any of the class members (without a cast, which defeats the point imo). –  Connell Watkins Mar 22 '13 at 9:58

When the IDisposables are of the same type, you can do the following:

 using (StreamReader outFile = new StreamReader(outputFile.OpenRead()), 
     expFile = new StreamReader(expectedFile.OpenRead()) {
     // ...
 }

The MSDN page on using has documentation on this language feature.

You can do the following whether or not the IDisposables are of the same type:

using (StreamReader outFile = new StreamReader(outputFile.OpenRead()))
using (StreamWriter anotherFile = new StreamReader(anotherFile.OpenRead()))
{ 
     // ...
}
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If you want to compare the files efficiently, don't use StreamReaders at all, and then the usings aren't necessary - you can use low level stream reads to pull in buffers of data to compare.

You can also compare things like the file size first to quickly detect different files to save yourself having to read all the data, too.

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Yeah, checking the file size is a good idea, saves you the time or reading all the bytes. (+1) –  TimothyP Aug 25 '09 at 17:50

if you don't mind declaring the variables for your using block before the using block, you could declare them all in the same using statement.

    Test t; 
    Blah u;
    using (IDisposable x = (t = new Test()), y = (u = new Blah())) {
        // whatever...
    }

That way, x and y are just placeholder variables of type IDisposable for the using block to use and you use t and u inside your code. Just thought i'd mention.

share|improve this answer

You can also say:

using (StreamReader outFile = new StreamReader(outputFile.OpenRead()))
using (StreamReader expFile = new StreamReader(expectedFile.OpenRead()))
{
   ...
}

But some people might find that hard to read. BTW, as an optimization to your problem, why dont you check that the file sizes are the same size first, before going line by line?

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There's nothing odd about it. using is a shorthand way of ensuring the disposal of the object once the code block is finished. If you have a disposable object in your outer block that the inner block needs to use, this is perfectly acceptable.

Edit: Too slow on the typing to show consolidated code example. +1 to everyone else.

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The using statement works off of the IDisposable interface so another option could be to create some type of composite class that implements IDisposable and has references to all of the IDisposable objects you would normally put in your using statement. The down side to this is that you have to declare your variables first and outside of the scope for them to be useful within the using block requiring more lines of code than some of the other suggestions would require.

Connection c = new ...; 
Transaction t = new ...;

using (new DisposableCollection(c, t))
{
   ...
}

The constructor for DisposableCollection is a params array in this case so you can feed in as many as you like.

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You could omit the brackets on all but the inner-most using:

using (StreamReader outFile = new StreamReader(outputFile.OpenRead()))
using (StreamReader expFile = new StreamReader(expectedFile.OpenRead()))
{
  while (!(outFile.EndOfStream || expFile.EndOfStream))
  {
    if (outFile.ReadLine() != expFile.ReadLine())
    {
      return false;
    }
  }
}

I think this is cleaner than putting several of the same type in the same using, as others have suggested, but I'm sure many people will think this is confusing

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3  
You can omit all the brackets in this case... –  Charles Bretana Aug 25 '09 at 17:55

And to just add to the clarity, in this case, since each successive statement is a single statement, (and not a block), you can omit all the brackets :

using (StreamReader outFile = new StreamReader(outputFile.OpenRead()))
  using (StreamReader expFile = new StreamReader(expectedFile.OpenRead()))
    while (!(outFile.EndOfStream || expFile.EndOfStream))  
       if (outFile.ReadLine() != expFile.ReadLine())    
          return false;
share|improve this answer

Are you also asking if there is a better way to compare to files? I prefer calculating a CRC or MD5 for both files and compare those.

For example you could use the following extension method:

public static class ByteArrayExtender
    {
        static ushort[] CRC16_TABLE =  { 
                      0X0000, 0XC0C1, 0XC181, 0X0140, 0XC301, 0X03C0, 0X0280, 0XC241, 
                      0XC601, 0X06C0, 0X0780, 0XC741, 0X0500, 0XC5C1, 0XC481, 0X0440, 
                      0XCC01, 0X0CC0, 0X0D80, 0XCD41, 0X0F00, 0XCFC1, 0XCE81, 0X0E40, 
                      0X0A00, 0XCAC1, 0XCB81, 0X0B40, 0XC901, 0X09C0, 0X0880, 0XC841, 
                      0XD801, 0X18C0, 0X1980, 0XD941, 0X1B00, 0XDBC1, 0XDA81, 0X1A40, 
                      0X1E00, 0XDEC1, 0XDF81, 0X1F40, 0XDD01, 0X1DC0, 0X1C80, 0XDC41, 
                      0X1400, 0XD4C1, 0XD581, 0X1540, 0XD701, 0X17C0, 0X1680, 0XD641, 
                      0XD201, 0X12C0, 0X1380, 0XD341, 0X1100, 0XD1C1, 0XD081, 0X1040, 
                      0XF001, 0X30C0, 0X3180, 0XF141, 0X3300, 0XF3C1, 0XF281, 0X3240, 
                      0X3600, 0XF6C1, 0XF781, 0X3740, 0XF501, 0X35C0, 0X3480, 0XF441, 
                      0X3C00, 0XFCC1, 0XFD81, 0X3D40, 0XFF01, 0X3FC0, 0X3E80, 0XFE41, 
                      0XFA01, 0X3AC0, 0X3B80, 0XFB41, 0X3900, 0XF9C1, 0XF881, 0X3840, 
                      0X2800, 0XE8C1, 0XE981, 0X2940, 0XEB01, 0X2BC0, 0X2A80, 0XEA41, 
                      0XEE01, 0X2EC0, 0X2F80, 0XEF41, 0X2D00, 0XEDC1, 0XEC81, 0X2C40, 
                      0XE401, 0X24C0, 0X2580, 0XE541, 0X2700, 0XE7C1, 0XE681, 0X2640, 
                      0X2200, 0XE2C1, 0XE381, 0X2340, 0XE101, 0X21C0, 0X2080, 0XE041, 
                      0XA001, 0X60C0, 0X6180, 0XA141, 0X6300, 0XA3C1, 0XA281, 0X6240, 
                      0X6600, 0XA6C1, 0XA781, 0X6740, 0XA501, 0X65C0, 0X6480, 0XA441, 
                      0X6C00, 0XACC1, 0XAD81, 0X6D40, 0XAF01, 0X6FC0, 0X6E80, 0XAE41, 
                      0XAA01, 0X6AC0, 0X6B80, 0XAB41, 0X6900, 0XA9C1, 0XA881, 0X6840, 
                      0X7800, 0XB8C1, 0XB981, 0X7940, 0XBB01, 0X7BC0, 0X7A80, 0XBA41, 
                      0XBE01, 0X7EC0, 0X7F80, 0XBF41, 0X7D00, 0XBDC1, 0XBC81, 0X7C40, 
                      0XB401, 0X74C0, 0X7580, 0XB541, 0X7700, 0XB7C1, 0XB681, 0X7640, 
                      0X7200, 0XB2C1, 0XB381, 0X7340, 0XB101, 0X71C0, 0X7080, 0XB041, 
                      0X5000, 0X90C1, 0X9181, 0X5140, 0X9301, 0X53C0, 0X5280, 0X9241, 
                      0X9601, 0X56C0, 0X5780, 0X9741, 0X5500, 0X95C1, 0X9481, 0X5440, 
                      0X9C01, 0X5CC0, 0X5D80, 0X9D41, 0X5F00, 0X9FC1, 0X9E81, 0X5E40, 
                      0X5A00, 0X9AC1, 0X9B81, 0X5B40, 0X9901, 0X59C0, 0X5880, 0X9841, 
                      0X8801, 0X48C0, 0X4980, 0X8941, 0X4B00, 0X8BC1, 0X8A81, 0X4A40, 
                      0X4E00, 0X8EC1, 0X8F81, 0X4F40, 0X8D01, 0X4DC0, 0X4C80, 0X8C41, 
                      0X4400, 0X84C1, 0X8581, 0X4540, 0X8701, 0X47C0, 0X4680, 0X8641, 
                      0X8201, 0X42C0, 0X4380, 0X8341, 0X4100, 0X81C1, 0X8081, 0X4040 };


        public static ushort CalculateCRC16(this byte[] source)
        {
            ushort crc = 0;

            for (int i = 0; i < source.Length; i++)
            {
                crc = (ushort)((crc >> 8) ^ CRC16_TABLE[(crc ^ (ushort)source[i]) & 0xFF]);
            }

            return crc;
        }

Once you've done that it's pretty easy to compare files:

public bool filesAreEqual(string outFile, string expFile)
{
    var outFileBytes = File.ReadAllBytes(outFile);
    var expFileBytes = File.ReadAllBytes(expFile);

    return (outFileBytes.CalculateCRC16() == expFileBytes.CalculateCRC16());
}

You could use the built in System.Security.Cryptography.MD5 class, but the calculated hash is a byte[] so you'd still have to compare those two arrays.

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2  
Instead of taking a byte array, the method should take a Stream object and call the ReadByte method until it returns -1. This will save large amounts of memory for large files. –  SLaks Aug 25 '09 at 17:53
    
How would you then calculate the crc over all the bytes? –  TimothyP Aug 25 '09 at 17:56
    
Oh never mind what I said :p Thnx, I'll change that in my code :p We only use it for data < 1000 bytes so haven't noticed problems yet but will change anyway –  TimothyP Aug 25 '09 at 18:00
    
Every time you call ReadByte the stream's position advances by one byte. Therefore, if you keep calling it until it returns -1 (EOF), it'll give you every byte in the file. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.io.stream.readbyte.aspx –  SLaks Aug 25 '09 at 18:00
6  
Using a CRC is great if you want to compare multiple files multiple times, but for a single comparison you have to read both files in their entirety to compute the CRCs - If you compare the data in small chunks then you can exit from the comparison as soon as you find a byte that differs. –  Jason Williams Aug 25 '09 at 19:51

Also, if you already know the paths, there's no point is scanning the directory.

Instead, I would recommend something like this:

string directory = Path.Combine(Environment.CurrentDirectory, @"TestArea\");

using (StreamReader outFile = File.OpenText(directory + filename + ".out"))
using (StreamReader expFile = File.OpenText(directory + filename + ".exp"))) 
{
    //...

Path.Combine will add a folder or filename to a path and make sure that there is exactly one backslash between the path and the name.

File.OpenText will open a file and create a StreamReader in one go.

By prefixing a string with @, you can avoid having to escape every backslash (eg, @"a\b\c")

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You can group multiple disposable objects in one using-statement with commas:

using (StreamReader outFile = new StreamReader(outputFile.OpenRead()), 
       expFile = new StreamReader(expectedFile.OpenRead()))
{

}
share|improve this answer

These come up time to time when I code as well. You could consider move the second using statement into another function?

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I think I may have found a syntactically cleaner way of declaring this using statement, and it appears to work for me? using var as your type in the using statement instead of IDisposable seems to dynamically infer type on both objects and allows me to instantiate both of my objects and call their properties and methods of the class they are allocated with, as in

using(var uow = new UnitOfWorkType1(), uow2 = new UnitOfWorkType2()){}.

If anyone knows why this isn't right, please let me know

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