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Call the parent method.How to implement?

 function Ch() {
        this.year = function (n) {
            return n
        }
    }

    function Pant() {
        this.name = 'Kelli';
        this.year = function (n) {
            return 5 + n
        }
    }

//extends

 Pant.prototype = new Ch();
    Pant.prototype.constructor = Pant;
    pant = new Pant();
    alert(pant.name); //Kelli
    alert(pant.year(5)) //10

How to сall the parent method

this.year = function (n) {
            return 5 + n
        } 

in object?Thank you all for your help

share|improve this question
1  
Pant? Parent? Are these the same? If so, does Ch stand for Child? If it does, then your naming is very confusing since the Parent in inheriting from the Child. –  I Hate Lazy Nov 8 '12 at 20:44
1  
...anyway, you're calling .year() successfully, so I'm not sure what your question actually is. –  I Hate Lazy Nov 8 '12 at 20:49
    
Have a look at this answer –  Bergi Nov 8 '12 at 20:54
    
Why is your year method not on the prototype of Ch? If there is a reason, please show us your actual code; else move it. –  Bergi Nov 8 '12 at 21:00
    
All methods must be in prototype?Why? –  zloctb Nov 8 '12 at 21:06

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Adapting this answer to your code:

function Ch() {
    this.year = function(n) {
        return n;
    }
}

function Pant() {
    Ch.call(this); // make this Pant also a Ch instance
    this.name = 'Kelli';
    var oldyear = this.year;
    this.year = function (n) {
        return 5 + oldyear(n);
    };
}
// Let Pant inherit from Ch
Pant.prototype = Object.create(Ch.prototype, {constructor:{value:Pant}});

var pant = new Pant();
alert(pant.name); // Kelli
alert(pant.year(5)) // 10
share|improve this answer
    
The questions is confusing, but I believe OP just wants to call Pant.prototype.year (considering the prototype from the original code, not the one returned by Object.create). –  bfavaretto Nov 8 '12 at 21:01
    
@bfavaretto: Yes, it is confusing. Yet the method is not on the prototype, unfortunately... –  Bergi Nov 8 '12 at 21:04
    
var oldyear = this.year; very good.Thanks –  zloctb Nov 8 '12 at 21:16

You can call overridden supper class(Parent) methods using __proto__ but it is not supported by IE

alert(pant.__proto__.year(5)) //5
share|improve this answer
    
This property is not supported in ie. –  zloctb Nov 8 '12 at 20:59

Here is how Google's Closure Library implements inheritance:

goog.inherits = function(childCtor, parentCtor) {
  function tempCtor() {};
  tempCtor.prototype = parentCtor.prototype;
  childCtor.superClass_ = parentCtor.prototype;
  childCtor.prototype = new tempCtor();
  childCtor.prototype.constructor = childCtor;
};

Your code would then become something like:

function Ch() {}
Ch.prototype.year = 
function (n) {
   return n
}

function Pant() {}
goog.inherits(Pant,Ch);
Pant.prototype.name = 'Kelli';
Pant.prototype.year = function (n) {
   return 5 + Pant.superClass_.year.call(this, n);//Call the parent class
}

pant = new Pant();
alert(pant.name); //Kelli
alert(pant.year(5)) //10

You could of course rename the goog.inherits function if you wanted.

share|improve this answer

First of all, assuming Ch is for "child", and Pant for "parent", you are doing it backwards, which is extremely confusing. When you say

Pant.prototype = new Ch();

You're making Pant inherit from Ch. I'm assuming that's really what you mean, and that you want to call the method that returns n, instead of the one that returns n + 5. So you can do this:

function Ch() {
    this.year = function (n) {
        return n;
    }
}

function Pant() {
    this.name = 'Kelli';
    this.year = function (n) {
        return 5 + n;
    }
}

Pant.prototype = new Ch();
Pant.prototype.constructor = Pant;
pant = new Pant();
alert(pant.name); //Kelli
alert(pant.year(5)) //10

// Is the below what you need?
alert(Pant.prototype.year(5)); // 5

http://jsfiddle.net/JNn5K/

share|improve this answer
    
VERY GOOD.THANKS! –  zloctb Nov 8 '12 at 21:19

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