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class Test
{
    public int a { get; set; }
    public int b { get; set; }

    public Test(int a, int b)
    {
        this.a = a;
        this.b = b;
    }

    public static int operator +(Test a)
    {
        int test = a.a*a.b;
        return test;
    }

    public void Testa()
    {
        Test t = new Test(5, 5);
        Console.WriteLine((t.a + t.b));
    }
}

When I call the Testa() method I want the result to be 5*5, but I'm not sure how to use this method above were I write over the + operator

share|improve this question
    
Why would you overload the + operator to be the * operator? Wouldn't it make more sense to just use *? –  Robert H Nov 8 '12 at 20:43
    
What are you trying to achieve? Your code doesn't make a lot of sense –  dtb Nov 8 '12 at 20:44
    
It's just for a simple exercise, so I understand how to work with this –  krillezzz Nov 8 '12 at 20:44
1  
If you want to understand things, it's probably best to do them sensibly (i.e. don't overload operators with operators that do totally different things). –  Wug Nov 8 '12 at 20:51
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2 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Your method overloads the unary + operator. So you can see it in action if you write:

Test t = new Test(5, 5);
Console.WriteLine(+t); // Prints 25

If you wanted to overload the binary + operator, you'd need to give two parameters. For example:

// I strongly suggest you don't use "a" and "b"
// as parameter names when they're already (bad) property names
public static int operator +(Test lhs, Test rhs)
{
    return lhs.a * rhs.b + lhs.b * rhs.a;    
}

Then use it as:

public static void Main()
{
    Test x = new Test(2, 3);
    Test y = new Test(4, 5);
    Console.WriteLine(x + y); // Prints 22 (2*5 + 3*4)
}
share|improve this answer
    
Just out of curiosity is it really overloading or just defining since if it is not defined in this particular case, you can't use it. I know it is called overloading in the literature because you usually overload operators that are already defined for some class (like == operator). Thank you in advance! –  Nikola Davidovic Nov 8 '12 at 20:58
    
@NikolaD-Nick: It's overloading. The name "+" means different things depending on the argument types, just like when you overload methods. –  Jon Skeet Nov 8 '12 at 20:59
1  
@NikolaD-Nick It's called overloading the operator not because it's replacing an existing overload, but in the sense of method overloading. If there is a method Foo(Bar b) and you add a new method Foo(Baz z) you just added a new "overload" to Foo. Foo is said to be "overloaded" because it can have different meanings depending on the context. In the same sense, this is adding a new overload to the + operator. –  Servy Nov 8 '12 at 21:00
    
Thank you for your answers. –  Nikola Davidovic Nov 8 '12 at 21:03
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You can't do that. The + operator overloads for integers are a part of the C# language specs, and cannot be overridden by user code.

What you could do is the following:

public class Test
{
    public int a { get; set; }
    public int b { get; set; }

    public Test(int a, int b)
    {
        this.a = a;
        this.b = b;
    }

    public static Test operator +(Test first, Test second)
    {
        return new Test(first.a * second.a
            , first.b * second.b);
    }

    public override string ToString()
    {
        return a.ToString() + " " + b.ToString();
    }

    public void Testa()
    {
        Test t = new Test(5, 5);
        Test t2 = new Test(2, 6);
        Console.WriteLine(t + t2);
    }
}

The idea here is that you're overloading the operator for a Test class, not an int.

In your case you were actually overloading the unary plus operator, not the binary operator.

share|improve this answer
    
The operator overload given by the OP is fine - he just wasn't invoking it. –  Jon Skeet Nov 8 '12 at 20:50
    
@JonSkeet I looked at the result he was trying to get an did my best to emulate how to get it, rather than demonstrate how to properly use the operator he did create. I realize that it's technically a valid unary operator. –  Servy Nov 8 '12 at 20:52
    
It still isn't clear to me exactly what the OP does want to do. –  Jon Skeet Nov 8 '12 at 20:57
    
@JonSkeet Agreed; this was simply my best guess at interpreting his intentions. –  Servy Nov 8 '12 at 20:58
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