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I have a unit test that checks for exception in constructor:

import unittest
from jaboci import Jacobi

class TestJacobi(unittest.TestCase):

    def test_even(self):
        a = 11
        n = 12
        Jacobi(a, n)
        self.assertRaises(ValueError, Jacobi, a, n)

if __name__ == '__main__':
    unittest.main()

The class under test:

class Jacobi:

    def __init__(self, a, n):
        self.a = a
        self.n = n
        if n % 2 == 0:
            raise ValueError("N must be odd.")

When i run unittest with -m unittest discover, the test fails:

E
======================================================================
ERROR: test_even (test_jacobi.TestJacobi)
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "/home/prasopes/prg/python/PycharmProjects/jacobi_symbol/test_jacobi.py", line 9, in test_even
    Jacobi(a, n)
  File "/home/prasopes/prg/python/PycharmProjects/jacobi_symbol/jaboci.py", line 7, in __init__
    raise ValueError("N must be odd.")
ValueError: N must be odd.

----------------------------------------------------------------------
Ran 1 test in 0.000s

FAILED (errors=1)
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Did you mean to import jaboci instead of import jacobi? –  abarnert Nov 8 '12 at 20:56
    
@abarnert it's a typo in the file name, thanks for pointing that out. I used autocompletion in my IDE so I didn't notice that. –  prasopes Nov 8 '12 at 21:32

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You call Jacobi(a, n) before self.assertRaises(ValueError, Jacobi, a, n). The exception you get is from this first call, so the test immediately fails. It never reaches the line with assertRaises.

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2  
+1. I suspect the OP actually wanted to do Jacobi(n, a) (which succeeds), then assertRaises(ValueError, Jacobi, a, n) (which fails as expected). If you do that, the tests pass. –  abarnert Nov 8 '12 at 20:55

[Since I don't have enough rep to comment on @mata answer...]

Just to be clear, you either need to

  • remove Jacobi(a, n) [implied by @mata]
  • or, call 'Jacobi(n, a)' [as posited by @abarnert comment to @mata]
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