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I have a structure like

class A:
    def __init__(self, x):
        self.a=x

class B(A):
    def __init__(self, x):
        self.b=x

class C(A):
    def __init__(self, x):
        self.c=x

class D(B,C):
    def __init__(self, x):
        self.d=x

Now I'd like to extend the __init__s such that both B and C will call A, too (B and C can be used as stand-alone classes). Moreover D should call A, B and C (D combines features from B and C but still needs to run all initializations). All __init__ take the same parameter. Obviously A should be called only once.

Do you see an easy way to do that?

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3  
Read this article on super(): rhettinger.wordpress.com/2011/05/26/super-considered-super . It deals precisely with how to solve this problem in a complex class hierarchy in Python. –  millimoose Nov 8 '12 at 21:05
    
Also, your design here is off. You really shouldn't need the same argument in every constructor. –  millimoose Nov 8 '12 at 21:07
1  
Are you in Python 2 or 3? And, if 2, did you mean to write a classic rather than new-style class? –  abarnert Nov 8 '12 at 21:14
    
Seeing as they're going away, you should never really mean to write a old-style class. –  millimoose Nov 8 '12 at 21:16
    
@millimoose: They've already gone away in 3.0 and later, and are never going away in 2.x, so… if you want old-style behavior in 2.x, it's actually safe to use it. Still a bad idea, of course. –  abarnert Nov 8 '12 at 21:19
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2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Use super. As far as I'm aware, this is it's purpose ...

First, some proposed reading:

  • Super considered harmful and super (simultaneously -- by different people)

Next, an example:

class A(object):
    def __init__(self, x):
        print "Called A"
        self.a=x

class B(A):
    def __init__(self, x):
        print "Called B"
        super(B,self).__init__(x)
        self.b=x

class C(A):
    def __init__(self, x):
        print "Called C"
        super(C,self).__init__(x)
        self.c=x

class D(B,C):
    def __init__(self, x):
        print "Called D"
        super(D,self).__init__(x)        
        self.d=x


foo = D(10)

As stated in the comments, you often see methods which use super defined to accept any number of positional and keyword arguments:

def mymethod(self,*args,**kwargs):
    super(thisclass,self).method(*args,**kwargs)
    ...

As that allows super to pass the necessary/unnecessary arguments on to other objects in the inheritance chain. Those methods can then decide which arguments they need and ignore the rest (passing them on to the next super of course)


Finally, to complete this discussion, we need to discuss python2.x vs. python3.x. In python2.x, all of your classes must be new style (they need to inherit from object eventually). In python3.x, this is automatic. And in python3.x, you can omit the arguments to super.

 super().__init__(*args,**kwargs)

However, I prefer the python2.x style as it works for both python2.x and python3.x and I'm always left wondering how super() (python3.x style) knows what object to pass to the underlying methods as self. It seems a lot more magical then even the python2.x version to me...

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To be fair, doing this with super() correctly is nontrivial and nonobvious. –  millimoose Nov 8 '12 at 21:06
    
@millimoose -- Generally, I think that doing anything with super is non-trivial and non-obvious. I generally don't use it because I don't need it in my code. Can you check my posted code and make sure that I did this correctly -- Commenting or editing if I did it wrong? –  mgilson Nov 8 '12 at 21:09
    
Personally, I really like super. This code is correct if the class hierarchy is to be considered private - that is, if you're not expecting API users to try to inject classes into the MRO using multiple inheritance. If they are trying to do that, you need to accept and pass on (or swallow, where appropriate) *args and **kwargs at every point in the tree, since you don't know what class will be called next by super. –  Benjamin Hodgson Nov 8 '12 at 21:13
    
@poorsod -- Yes, I understand that you need to use *args and **kwargs where appropriate, but OP specified that all of the various __init__ took the same arguments. –  mgilson Nov 8 '12 at 21:14
    
@mgilson When all the constructor signatures across the hierarchy match, this is a good solution. (It's just an impractical restriction for real code is all.) –  millimoose Nov 8 '12 at 21:15
show 10 more comments

Using super

class D(B, C):
    def __init__(self, *args, **kwargs):
        super(D, self).__init__(*args, **kwargs)
        self.d = args[0]

Some explanation about super here and a related question

In Python 2 you should also inherit from object to use new style classes, and add super to your other classes too.

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If you're writing code for Python 3, why not use the simplified super instead of the Python 2 style? Just remove the params: super().__init__(*args, **kwargs). –  abarnert Nov 8 '12 at 21:17
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