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I have a variable and want to take a range of bits from that variable. I want the CLEANEST way to do this.

If x = 19767 and I want bit3 - bit8 (starting from the right): 100110100110111 is 19767 in binary. I want the part in parenthesis 100110(100110)111 so the answer is 38.

What is the simplest/cleanest/most-elegant way to implement the following function with Ruby?

bit_range(orig_num, first_bit, last_bit)

PS. Bonus points for answers that are computationally less intensive.

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So you don't want to learn binary and use ANDs and SHIFTs like us veterans? Huh. Kids these days. :-) –  the Tin Man Nov 8 '12 at 23:08
    
no no... bring on the binary! I'm all about it. –  Selah Nov 9 '12 at 14:20
    
You should accept @DigitalRoss's answer then as he's showing both a String based solution, along with pure bit twiddling. Don't reject using to_s(2) though, it can short-circuit a lot of messy shifting and ANDing. –  the Tin Man Nov 9 '12 at 14:43
    
I'll accept an answer, don't worry. I'm not a stack-overflow slacker. I'm confused about your second sentance, Digital Ross's second answer has no to_s(2) and it is not messy. –  Selah Nov 9 '12 at 15:17
    
Comments to @texasbruce's answer wanted a non-to_s(2) solution. There's a lot to be said for using to_s(2) string manipulation, though it gives up a little speed as it can greatly simply the twiddling. –  the Tin Man Nov 9 '12 at 15:24

6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted
19767.to_s(2)[-9..-4].to_i(2)

or

19767 >> 3 & 0x3f

Update:

Soup-to-nuts (why do people say that, anyway?) ...

class Fixnum
  def bit_range low, high
    len = high - low + 1
    self >> low & ~(-1 >> len << len)
  end
end

p 19767.bit_range(3, 8)
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1  
+1. That first one is mighty sweet. –  the Tin Man Nov 8 '12 at 23:19
    
i like the second one because it doesn't require string conversion, but is there a way to make it more general, so I could input any starting bit and any ending bit –  Selah Nov 9 '12 at 14:29
    
Sure there's ways to do it, but we expect you to figure that sort of thing out. It's simply substituting variables for values you've calculated. Think of what 0x3f looks in binary, along with what >> 3 is doing. –  the Tin Man Nov 9 '12 at 14:52
    
I guess I could substitute 0x3f with 2^(high_bit)-1 ?? –  Selah Nov 9 '12 at 15:18
1  
Adding bit_range strikes a nice balance with readability and speed. Well done, as usual. :-) –  the Tin Man Nov 9 '12 at 15:40
orig_num.to_s(2)[(-last_bit-1)..(-first_bit-1)].to_i(2)
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This is a nice solution, but I wonder if there is a clean way to do this task without converting to a string and back... –  Gregory Brown Nov 8 '12 at 23:02
    
@GregoryBrown you cant really do bitwise shift because selecting a range requires shifting both right and left, and the boundary for shifting left in Ruby is .. Eh unknown. –  texasbruce Nov 8 '12 at 23:51
    
Good point. I was sort of hoping that because you can do original_num[index], that original_num[start..end] would work, but unfortunately that's not supported ;-) –  Gregory Brown Nov 9 '12 at 0:14

Here is how this could be done using pure number operations:

class Fixnum
  def slice(range_or_start, length = nil)
    if length
      start = range_or_start
    else
      range = range_or_start
      start = range.begin
      length = range.count
    end

    mask = 2 ** length - 1

    self >> start & mask
  end
end

def p n
  puts "0b#{n.to_s(2)}"; n
end

p 0b100110100110111.slice(3..8) # 0b100110
p 0b100110100110111.slice(3, 6) # 0b100110
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Please don't edit my answer with the results of running the benchmark for your code on your machine. Machines vary in speed, so if you feel your algorithm wasn't running at its full speed feel free to copy the benchmark code, run it on your machine, and put the full results into your answer. Doing otherwise could result in misleading values. –  the Tin Man Nov 9 '12 at 15:30
    
I have copied the full benchmark results of course. From your comment I thought you were fine with me running the new benchmark on my machine. –  Semyon Perepelitsa Nov 9 '12 at 15:36
    
I'm fine with you running it, just don't modify the results I show. You could add your results to your answer, or have appended them to mine. Overwriting mine is different. –  the Tin Man Nov 9 '12 at 15:38
    
Sorry, I misunderstood your "beat you to it". The point of my solution is not in speed, but I thought your answer might be better with a second usage. Anyway, I'm leaving that up to you. –  Semyon Perepelitsa Nov 9 '12 at 15:43
    
thanks semyon, this answer is good, wish I could check two answers –  Selah Nov 9 '12 at 20:23

Just to show the speeds of the suggested answers:

require 'benchmark'

ORIG_NUMBER = 19767

def f(x,i,j)
  b = x.to_s(2)
  n = b.size
  b[(n-j-1)...(n-i)].to_i(2)
end

class Fixnum
  def bit_range low, high
    len = high - low + 1
    self >> low & ~(-1 >> len << len)
  end

  def slice(range_or_start, length = nil)
    if length
      start = range_or_start
    else
      range = range_or_start
      start = range.begin
      length = range.count
    end

    mask = 2 ** length - 1

    self >> start & mask
  end
end

def p n
  puts "0b#{n.to_s(2)}"; n
end

n = 1_000_000
puts "Using #{ n } loops in Ruby #{ RUBY_VERSION }."
Benchmark.bm(21) do |b|
  b.report('texasbruce') { n.times { ORIG_NUMBER.to_s(2)[(-8 - 1)..(-3 - 1)].to_i(2) } }
  b.report('DigitalRoss string') { n.times { ORIG_NUMBER.to_s(2)[-9..-4].to_i(2) } }
  b.report('DigitalRoss binary') { n.times { ORIG_NUMBER >> 3 & 0x3f } }
  b.report('DigitalRoss bit_range') { n.times { 19767.bit_range(3, 8) } }
  b.report('Philip') { n.times { f(ORIG_NUMBER, 3, 8) } }
  b.report('Semyon Perepelitsa') { n.times { ORIG_NUMBER.slice(3..8) } }
end

And the output:

Using 1000000 loops in Ruby 1.9.3.
                            user     system      total        real
texasbruce              1.240000   0.010000   1.250000 (  1.243709)
DigitalRoss string      1.000000   0.000000   1.000000 (  1.006843)
DigitalRoss binary      0.260000   0.000000   0.260000 (  0.262319)
DigitalRoss bit_range   0.840000   0.000000   0.840000 (  0.858603)
Philip                  1.520000   0.000000   1.520000 (  1.543751)
Semyon Perepelitsa      1.150000   0.010000   1.160000 (  1.155422)

That's on my old MacBook Pro. Your mileage might vary.

share|improve this answer
    
Nice :-) You should add an example with length too: ORIG_NUMBER.slice(3, 6) –  Semyon Perepelitsa Nov 9 '12 at 15:11
    
I beat you to it. –  the Tin Man Nov 9 '12 at 15:12
    
cool... thank you! –  Selah Nov 9 '12 at 15:22
    
No DigitalRose 's solutions does not contain variables. Its all constants so surly its faster. –  texasbruce Nov 9 '12 at 16:33

Makes sense to define a function for that:

def f(x,i,j)
  b = x.to_s(2)
  n = b.size
  b[(n-j-1)...(n-i)].to_i(2)
end

puts f(19767, 3, 8) # => 38
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nice, thanks for actually defining a function. is there a way to do it without converting to strings though?? –  Selah Nov 9 '12 at 14:31

Expanding on the idea from DigitalRoss - instead of taking two arguments, you can pass a range:

class Fixnum
  def bit_range range
    len = range.last - range.first + 1
    self >> range.first & ~(-1 >> len << len)
  end
end

19767.bit_range 3..8
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