Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have to create a function that takes in a vector of unknown item types. Here is my code:

template <typename S>
void printVector(vector<S*> c){
   typename vector<S>::const_iterator A = c.begin();
   for (int A; A != c.end(); A++){
       cout<<c[A]<<" ";
   }
   cout<<endl;
}

In my main class here is my vector and function call:

vector<int> x;
int j=5;
for(int i=0;i<j;i++){
    x.push_back(num[i]);
}
printVector(x);

When I try to compile this code I get these errors:

exercise1_1.cpp: In function ‘int main()’:
exercise1_1.cpp:33:15: error: no matching function for call to ‘printVector(std::vector<int>&)
exercise1_1.cpp:33:15: note: candidate is:
exercise1_1.cpp:13:7: note: template<class S> void printVector(std::vector<S*>)

share|improve this question
3  
A vector of 'S' or a vector of pointer to 'S'? What type is 'std::vector<>::end()'? Is that comparable with 'int' as in 'A != c.end()'? –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Nov 8 '12 at 22:55
6  
Do me a favour; mouse over the homework tag. –  chris Nov 8 '12 at 22:55
    
sorry @chris I'm not as familiar with this site as you but okay.. It is a vector of type 'S' and end() returns an iterator referring to the end element in the vector container. –  user1672267 Nov 8 '12 at 23:00
1  
@user1672267: Then vector<S*> is a typo and so is int A. In fact I think you just wrote int A because you're used to seeing int declarations in that part of a for construct, but it's not correct in this case. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Nov 8 '12 at 23:01

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted
template <typename S>
void  printVector(const std::vector<S>& c){
   typename std::vector<S>::const_iterator A = c.begin();
   for (; A != c.end(); A++){
       std::cout<<*A<<" ";
   }
   std::cout<<"\n";
}

Fixes:

  • Your function was declared to take a vector<S*> but you obviously want it to take vector<S>.
    • Your main function invoked print_vector with an argument of std::vector<int>. Since an int is not an S* for any type of S, the template did not apply.
  • You have redeclared A when you intended to use only the first declaration.
  • You conflated indexed access to the vector with access through the iterator.
    • If you have an int: c[i]
    • If you have an iterator: *it

Less critical fixes:

  • Avoid using namespace std;
  • Never use std::endl when you mean "\n".
  • You should pass the parameter by const reference, not by value
share|improve this answer
    
Rob, the reason the homework tag is obsolete is that Stack Overflow encourages all answers to consist of dialog and explanation, rather than spoonfeeding code dumps. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Nov 8 '12 at 23:03
    
@LightnessRacesinOrbit - right. That's the point of the dialog that follows the code dump. –  Robᵩ Nov 8 '12 at 23:04
    
It wasn't there to begin with, and you know it ;) * > FGIW –  Lightness Races in Orbit Nov 8 '12 at 23:08
1  
Why would the OP not mean std::endl? Flushing the output at the end of the line seems like a sensible think to do here. –  Grizzly Nov 8 '12 at 23:13
1  
@Grizzly - Either the OP directed the output to an interactive console or he directed to a file. If it is a console, the runtime will automatically flush the output at the end of the line, and he gains nothing. If it is a file it doesn't matter if it is flushed (unless his program crashes), and he gains nothing and loses performance. Maybe OP meant to use endl. In my experience, 99% of people who use endl don't require or intend the flush. –  Robᵩ Nov 8 '12 at 23:16

There were some errors in your code. Let's look at them:

  • In the signature of printVector, you take a parameter of type vector<S*>. This means that, for a given type S, you take a vector of pointers to S. So, for example, if the type is int, you should 'send' a vector<int*>. In your example, you are attempting to 'send' a vector<int>, so the signature of printVector should look like this:

    template <typename S>
    void printVector(vector<S> c)
    
  • In your for loop, you are declaring the variable A again, as int. In the C++ standard library, you can access every item in a vector using iterators or just accessing them like an array. You were mixing both things.

If you want to loop using iterators, it should look like this:

typename vector<S>::const_iterator a = c.begin();
for (; a != c.end(); a++){
    cout<<*a<<" ";
}

Which means, for every item in the vector, print its value (notice I used *a because I'm using iterators).

Or using the index-based approach:

for (int i = 0; i < c.size(); i++){
   cout<<c[i]<<" ";
}

Also, as a common practice in C++ community, use a const reference when receiving variables of non-primitive types. This prevents that a copy of the object is performed, so it will probably be faster when dealing with huge collections. Example:

 void printVector(const vector<S>& c)

So here is a full working example:

#include <vector>
#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

template <typename S>
void printVector(const vector<S>& c){
   for (int i = 0; i < c.size(); i++){
       cout<<c[i]<<" ";
   }
   cout<<endl;
}

int main(int argc, char** args) {
    vector<int> x;
    int j=5;
    for(int i=0;i<j;i++){
        x.push_back(i);
    }
    printVector<int>(x); // Can be printVector(x); too
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Why would the compiler fail to deduce the template arguments in this case? printVector(x) should be perfectly fine –  Grizzly Nov 8 '12 at 23:16
    
I just wasn't sure if the C++ compilers actually infer the type.. But as they do, I just edited it. Thanks for the comment –  Daniel Castro Nov 8 '12 at 23:19

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.