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Is it possible to produce a compile-time boolean value based on whether or not a C++11 expression is a constant expression (i.e. constexpr) in C++11? A few questions on SO relate to this, but I don't see a straight answer anywhere.

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gcc has __builtin_constant_p(), gcc.gnu.org/onlinedocs/gcc-4.1.2/gcc/Other-Builtins.html –  Joseph Quinsey Nov 8 '12 at 23:10
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@user643722 Sorry, my comment was missing "or". There are two cases: true if f has a constexpr, false otherwise specifier AND true if f has a constexpr and fe(x) is actually const. Which do you want the weaker or the stronger condition? –  pmr Nov 8 '12 at 23:23
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"I.e." means literally "that is." Translate it as "which is to say." Did you mean "e.g."? –  Jive Dadson Nov 8 '12 at 23:35
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@JiveDadson: No, I do mean i.e. –  user2023370 Nov 8 '12 at 23:42
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@user643722 So you want specifically to know if the value is declared with the keyword constexpr? That is what "i.e." implies, but I do not think most people would consider "a constant expression" and "constexpr" to be synonymous. –  Jive Dadson Nov 8 '12 at 23:50

3 Answers 3

I once wrote it (EDIT: see below for limitations and explanations). From http://stackoverflow.com/a/10287598/34509 :

template<typename T> 
constexpr typename remove_reference<T>::type makeprval(T && t) {
  return t;
}

#define isprvalconstexpr(e) noexcept(makeprval(e))

However there are many kinds of constant expressions. The above answer detects prvalue constant expressions.


Explanation

The noexcept(e) expression gives false iff e contains

  • a potentially evaluated call to a function that does not have a non-throwing exception-specification unless the call is a constant expression,
  • a potentially evaluated throw expression,
  • a potentially evaluated throwable form of dynamic_cast or typeid.

Note that the function template makeprval is not declared noexcept, so the call needs to be a constant expression for the first bullet not to apply, and this is what we abuse. We need the other bullets to not apply aswell, but thanksfully, both a throw and a throwable dynamic_cast or typeid aren't allowed in constant expressions aswell, so this is fine.

Limitations

Unfortunately there is a suble limitation, which may or may not matter for you. The notion of "potentially evaluated" is much more conservative than the limits of what constant expressions apply. So the above noexcept may give false negatives. It will report that some expressions aren't prvalue constant expressions, even though they are. Example:

constexpr int a = (0 ? throw "fooled!" : 42);
constexpr bool atest = isprvalconstexpr((0 ? throw "fooled!" : 42));

In the above atest is false, even though the initialization of a succeeded. That is because for being a constant expression, it suffices that the "evil" non-constant sub-expressions are "never evaluated", even though those evil sub-expressions are potentially-evaluated, formally.

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It is not part of the type. You cannot use the proposed method. –  Sergey K. Nov 9 '12 at 9:16
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@sergey i dont understand. can you explain why my method does not work? –  Johannes Schaub - litb Nov 9 '12 at 9:24
    
Upvoted, but please copy the implementation into this answer. –  ecatmur Nov 9 '12 at 9:42
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@user thanks for your report. i will try to figure out why it fails on clang later today. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Nov 9 '12 at 9:50
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@litb This doesn't work on Clang yet because Clang doesn't check whether a call is a constant expression when deciding whether it is noexcept. –  Richard Smith May 20 '13 at 6:16

Here's an attempt, of course it only works for functions right now (any criticism is welcome):

#include <type_traits>
#include <iostream>

template<typename T>
constexpr bool wrapper(T){
    return true;
}

template
<typename F,
typename std::decay<F>::type FP,
typename... Args,
bool = wrapper(FP(Args{}...))>
constexpr bool is_constexpr_impl(bool&&)
{
    return true;
}

template
<typename F,
typename std::decay<F>::type FP,
typename... Args>
constexpr bool is_constexpr_impl(const bool&&)
{
    return false;
}

template
<typename F,
typename std::decay<F>::type FP,
typename... Args>
constexpr bool is_constexpr(Args...)
{
    return is_constexpr_impl<F, FP, Args...>(0);
}

constexpr int f(int a, int b)
{
    return a + b;
}

constexpr float g(float a, float b)
{
    return a + b;
}

int h(int a, int b)
{
    return a + b;
}

float i(float a, float b)
{
    return a + b;
}

int main()
{
    std::cout << std::boolalpha;
    std::cout << is_constexpr<decltype(f), &f>(1, 1) << std::endl;
    std::cout << is_constexpr<decltype(g), &g>(1.0f, 1.0f) << std::endl;
    std::cout << is_constexpr<decltype(h), &h>(1, 1) << std::endl;
    std::cout << is_constexpr<decltype(i), &i>(1.0f, 1.0f) << std::endl;
}

Example on liveworkspace.

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As with the answer from @JohannesSchaub-litb, using Clang 3.2 the result is four falses. –  user2023370 Nov 9 '12 at 14:06
    
@user643722: I don't have clang to test. Could you comment out the constexpr bool is_constexpr_impl(const bool&&) version and see if compilation fails? If it does, please post the compiler errors from clang. I also suspect that this SO question might be related. –  Jesse Good Nov 9 '12 at 19:47
    
Here we are: pastebin.com/vCYL3q43 –  user2023370 Nov 9 '12 at 23:04
    
@user643722: Thanks for the error messages. Looks like a bug in clang. –  Jesse Good Nov 11 '12 at 21:31
    
It looks like this doesn't account for whether the arguments are constexpr. If you pass in a where it is declared as int a = 0, the results do not change, even though f(a, a) would not actually be constexpr. –  David Stone Oct 7 '13 at 5:14

Let's do some naive play with the SFINAE idiom:

template <typename C> struct IsConstExpr
{
    typedef char yes;
    typedef char no[2];

    template <typename T> static constexpr yes& swallow(T) { int x[T()]; return 0; };
    template <typename T> static no& swallow(...);

    static const int value = sizeof(swallow<C>(0)) == sizeof(yes);
};

The code above is syntactically wrong, but it will give us some insight. Let's try to make use of it:

constexpr int f() { return 32167; }

int g() { return 32167; }

int main()
{
   std::cout << IsConstExpr<decltype(&f)>::value << std::endl;
}

The compiler says:

In instantiation of 'static constexpr IsConstExpr<C>::yes& IsConstExpr<C>::swallow(T) [with T = int (*)(); C = int (*)(); IsConstExpr<C>:
:yes = char]':

Now the problem is obvious: the parameter of the template is T = int (*)();

It means that constexpr is not part of type and we cannot detect it.

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So you can't detect whether f is a constexpr function. But can you detect whether f() is a constant expression (without causing a compiler error if it's not)? –  aschepler Nov 9 '12 at 0:00
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Maybe, if we will find a way to detect difference int x[f()] vs int x[g()] without compiler error. SFINAE looks like a promising starting point to experiment with. –  Sergey K. Nov 9 '12 at 0:03
3  
OK, so you cannot figure out how to do it with your particular compiler. Is that a proof that it is impossible for anyone using any conforming compiler? –  Nemo Nov 9 '12 at 0:13
    
@Nemo: it has nothing to do with the compiler. It is in the spec that constexpr is not part of the type. So, why downvote? –  Sergey K. Nov 9 '12 at 8:28
2  
The question wasn't if constexpr is part of type, it is if it is possible to produce a compile time value from it. You fail to prove your last sentence, that if constexpr isn't part of the type it cannot be "detected". –  hirschhornsalz Nov 9 '12 at 11:08

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