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I hava a piece of code:

private void colorize(int color, int x, int y) {
    visited[x][y] = true;
    if (x + 1 < d)
        if (board[x + 1][y] == board[x][y] && visited[x + 1][y] == false)
            colorize(color, x + 1, y);
    if (x - 1 >= 0)
        if (board[x - 1][y] == board[x][y] && visited[x - 1][y] == false)
            colorize(color, x - 1, y);
    if (y + 1 < d)
        if (board[x][y + 1] == board[x][y] && visited[x][y + 1] == false)
            colorize(color, x, y + 1);
    if (y - 1 >= 0)
        if (board[x][y - 1] == board[x][y] && visited[x][y - 1] == false)
            colorize(color, x, y - 1);
    board[x][y] = color;
}

I call it: colorize(int random, int 0, int 0).This gives me stackoverflow even for small table(20x20). How do that without recursion? Thanks in advice.

P.S: I am writing for Android.

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1  
I can't see the reference to d. What's d? –  Raunak Agarwal Nov 8 '12 at 23:01
1  
Convert the recursive algorithm to an iterative one. –  Matt Ball Nov 8 '12 at 23:01
4  
Typically a stackoverflow indicates that you missed a base case. You should run through this code with a debugger (or appropriate SOP statements) to find the problem. –  Code-Apprentice Nov 8 '12 at 23:01
    
On a 20x20 board, shouldn't this only be 40 stack frames in depth? That's not that large. –  sharth Nov 8 '12 at 23:04
    
Looks like the conclusion to draw here is: do not use recursion for O(n^2) problems, or for any problem at all, except for the fun of it –  Måns Rolandi Nov 9 '12 at 0:12

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The code as given seems fine.

There is a question as to what d is, but I'm assuming that it is correctly the width of a square grid.

It's possible that you have a problem in whatever code calls this, but the code you have given us should not have a stack overflow.


Building off of Måns Rolandi Danielsson's answer, here is one that doesn't use the explicit stack, but builds one on the heap. My java is extremely rusty, but this should work. If anyone has fixes for this code, feel free to fix it.

Instead of getting a stack overflow, at large table sizes I get a java.lang.OutOfMemoryError: Java heap space error instead. You could probably use a set or some other data structure (rather than a linked list) to optimize memory usage.

import java.util.Queue;
import java.util.LinkedList;

class Pair<L,R> {
    private L l;
    private R r;

    public Pair(L l, R r){
        this.l = l;
        this.r = r;
    }

    public L getL(){ return l; }
    public R getR(){ return r; }
}


public class HelloW {
    static int d = 20;
    static boolean[][] visited = new boolean[d][d];
    static int[][] board = new int[d][d];

    static Queue<Pair<Integer, Integer>> Q = new LinkedList<Pair<Integer, Integer>>();

    static void colorize(int color, int orig_x, int orig_y) {
        Q.add(new Pair<Integer, Integer>(orig_x, orig_y));

        while (Q.isEmpty() == false) {
            Pair<Integer,Integer> foo = Q.remove();
            int x = foo.getL();
            int y = foo.getR();
            int old_color = board[x][y];

            visited[x][y] = true;
            board[x][y]  = color;

            if (x + 1 < d)
                if (board[x + 1][y] == old_color && visited[x + 1][y] == false)
                    Q.add(new Pair<Integer, Integer>(x+1, y));
            if (x - 1 >= 0)
                if (board[x - 1][y] == old_color && visited[x - 1][y] == false)
                    Q.add(new Pair<Integer, Integer>(x-1, y));
            if (y + 1 < d)
                if (board[x][y + 1] == old_color && visited[x][y + 1] == false)
                    Q.add(new Pair<Integer, Integer>(x, y+1));
            if (y - 1 >= 0)
                if (board[x][y - 1] == old_color && visited[x][y - 1] == false)
                    Q.add(new Pair<Integer, Integer>(x, y-1));
        }
    }

    public static void main (String[] args) {
        colorize(1, 0, 0);
    }
}
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WORKS GREAT! Thank you. You are brilliant:) –  Mateusz Kaflowski Nov 9 '12 at 7:53

I just copied your code and ran it like you can see below, and it works perfect, ends up with a matrix full of "true"'s and a matrix full of ones:

static int d = 20;
static boolean[][] visited = new boolean[d][d];
static int[][] board = new int[d][d];

static void colorize(int color, int x, int y) {
    visited[x][y] = true;
    if (x + 1 < d)
        if (board[x + 1][y] == board[x][y] && visited[x + 1][y] == false)
            colorize(color, x + 1, y);
    if (x - 1 >= 0)
        if (board[x - 1][y] == board[x][y] && visited[x - 1][y] == false)
            colorize(color, x - 1, y);
    if (y + 1 < d)
        if (board[x][y + 1] == board[x][y] && visited[x][y + 1] == false)
            colorize(color, x, y + 1);
    if (y - 1 >= 0)
        if (board[x][y - 1] == board[x][y] && visited[x][y - 1] == false)
            colorize(color, x, y - 1);
    board[x][y] = color;
}

public static void main(String[] args)
{
    colorize(1, 0, 0);
}

EDIT: the test program runs fine for d = 20 on my computer, however if I increase to d = 100 I get the StackOverflow. It seems the algorithm is more or less fine, but the recursion goes unnecessary deep, there ought to be a more elegant formulation.

share|improve this answer
    
I guess you have more memory assigned to your JVM –  Raunak Agarwal Nov 8 '12 at 23:15
    
it finishes in couple of millis, would it not take whole lot of time to recursively fill up my ram you think? also, looking at the code it seems fine –  Måns Rolandi Nov 8 '12 at 23:16
    
@RaunakAgarwal Sorry you were right! If I increase to d = 100, I get the overflow. I will need to look more closely obviously. –  Måns Rolandi Nov 8 '12 at 23:31
    
Yeah probably the algorithm is just fine –  Raunak Agarwal Nov 8 '12 at 23:36

Your code works correctly as far as I can tell; the only thing that could affect it is if another thread came and modified one of your data structures during the recursion, or if you have over-simplified it before posting.

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