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While writing on a program I currently work on, I noticed some change in perfomance and wanted to check the calculation times in some loops I am using to explain this.

I wrote a very simple program that does a simple addition calculation in a loop and outputs the time it took to do it and I noticed two for me at the moment unexplainable effects.

First the code:

public partial class MainWindow : Window
{
    public MainWindow()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
    }

    private void button1_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
    {
        int a = 1, b = 2, c = 0;

        Stopwatch sw = new Stopwatch();

        sw.Start();
        for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++)
        {
            c += (a + b);
        }
        sw.Stop();
        c = 0;
        textBlock1.Text = 100 + ": " + sw.ElapsedTicks;

        sw.Restart();
        for (int i = 0; i < 1000; i++)
        {
            c += (a + b);
        }
        sw.Stop();
        c = 0;
        textBlock2.Text = 1000 + ": " + sw.ElapsedTicks;

        sw.Restart();
        for (int i = 0; i < 10000; i++)
        {
            c += (a + b);
        }
        sw.Stop();
        c = 0;
        textBlock3.Text = 10000 + ": " + sw.ElapsedTicks;

        sw.Restart();
        for (int i = 0; i < 1000000; i++)
        {
            c += (a + b);
        }
        sw.Stop();
        c = 0;
        textBlock4.Text = 1000000 + ": " + sw.ElapsedTicks;

        sw.Restart();
        for (int i = 0; i < 100000000; i++)
        {
            c += (a + b);
        }
        sw.Stop();

        textBlock5.Text = 100000000 + ": " + sw.ElapsedTicks;
    }
}

Now I could oberserve the following:

  1. The first time after starting the program clicking on the button and calculating, the short loop of 100 takes around twice/three times (6-9 ticks) as long as the second time I run it (2-4). After that it will remain at around the same length (2-4 ticks).

  2. There are weird proportions between the loop times which remain quite constant when I keep clicking the button which are about as follows:

    • 100: 3
    • 1000: 15
    • 10000: 150
    • 1000000: 17000
    • 100000000: 840000

Is there an explanation why the 100 loop takes aroud 1/5 of the time of the 1000 loop, even though it is 1/10 times as many calculations, and also why does the 100 Mio. loop take only around 50 times as long as the 1 Mio. loop even though it is 100 times as many calculations? And does anybody have an idea why the time (especially for the 100 loop) change after I ran the calculation once after starting the program and then remains quite constant?

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1 Answer

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Is there an explanation why the 100 loop takes aroud 1/5 of the time of the 1000 loop, even though it is 1/10 times as many calculations

You're measuring three ticks that's a tiny, tiny amount of time. If you happened to run into a context switch, you'd probably lose much more time than that, even if your thread was scheduled again straight away. It's basically not a large enough amount of time to be measured sensibly, even with Stopwatch.

And does anybody have an idea why the time (especially for the 100 loop) change after I ran the calculation once after starting the program and then remains quite constant?

My guess is that it's to do with JIT compilation and/or garbage collection.

This is why typically benchmarks run a "warmup" round first, and they test a sensible amount of work so that the tests will take a reasonable amount of time, smoothing little bumps in timing.

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Thanks for the fast answer. Yes, the 100 loop is very short. But comparing the 100 Mio. loop and 1 Mio. loop should be in some way comparable or not? Especially since the other ones (1000, 10000 and 1 Mio.) seem to be quite linear in time. –  phil13131 Nov 8 '12 at 23:10
    
@phil13131: Even in the 1,000,000 case, you're still only measuring 1.7 milliseconds. All kinds of things can affect performance at that level. I don't generally trust any benchmark which runs for less than a second - preferrably much longer. –  Jon Skeet Nov 8 '12 at 23:13
    
Okay, I will just take it as it is then. I was just surprised by this sudden "bump" at what I thought was actually quite a long loop. And thanks for pointing out the JIT compiler, however, I thought that it compile the entire method of the button before executing it, so it shouldn't really make a difference. –  phil13131 Nov 8 '12 at 23:18
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