Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Object_required:_'state.Item(...).Item(...)'

I have this error occurring on this line of code;

If state.Item(level).Item(conflictItem).Item("menu_state") = "CHECKED" Then
 ... do some stuff
End If

I know there may be times when that is not defined so I do this instead;

If IsObject(state.Item(level).Item(childRequires).Item("menu_state")) And state.Item(level).Item(childRequires).Item("menu_state")state.Item(level).Item(childRequires).Item("menu_state") = "CHECKED" Then
   ... do some stuff                        
End If

but I still get the same error. Code works fine for everything until it looks for the one item that should not be there. I also tried Not IsNothing, Not IsNull, nothing catches it.

share|improve this question
    
Have you checked object further up the chain? –  Nilpo Nov 9 '12 at 3:30
add comment

3 Answers

In addition to Cheran's correct answer (and to show the flaw in Flakes'):

Short-circuit evaluation (better link for the problem at hand)

Short-circuit evaluation in action:

VBScript is eager (to evaluate expressions unnecessarily):

Option Explicit

Function F()
  WScript.StdOut.Write "F() called ==> "
  F = True
End Function

Dim A, R
For Each A In Array(False, True)
    WScript.StdOut.Write CStr(A) & " and F() ==> "
    If A And F() Then R = "YES" Else R = "NO"
    WScript.StdOut.WriteLine R

    WScript.StdOut.Write CStr(A) & " or F() ==> "
    If A Or  F() Then R = "YES" Else R = "NO"
    WScript.StdOut.WriteLine R
Next

output:

False and F() ==> F() called ==> NO
False or F() ==> F() called ==> YES
True and F() ==> F() called ==> YES
True or F() ==> F() called ==> YES

JScript is lazy (unnecessary checks are skipped):

function F() {
  WScript.StdOut.Write("F() called ==> ");
  return true;
}

var B = [false, true];
var R;
for (var I in B) {
  var A = B[I];
  WScript.StdOut.Write(A + " and F() ==> ");
  if (A && F()) {R = "YES";} else {R = "NO";}
  WScript.StdOut.WriteLine(R);

  WScript.StdOut.Write(A + " or F() ==> ");
  if (A || F()) {R = "YES";} else {R = "NO";}
  WScript.StdOut.WriteLine(R);
}

output:

false and F() ==> NO
false or F() ==> F() called ==> YES
true and F() ==> F() called ==> YES
true or F() ==> YES

Nested Ifs can be avoided by Select Case False/True:

Option Explicit

Class C
  Function F()
    WScript.StdOut.Write "C.F() called ==> "
    F = True
  End Function
End Class

Class D
  Public m_C
  Private Sub Class_Initialize()
    Set m_C = Nothing
  End Sub
  Function init()
    Set init = Me
    Set m_C = New C
  End Function
End Class

Class I
  Private m_I
  Private Sub Class_Initialize()
    m_I = 0
  End Sub
  Public Default Function Inc()
    m_I = m_I + 1
    Inc = Right("   " & m_I, 3) & " "
  End Function
End Class

Dim N : Set N = New I
Dim O, R
For Each O In Array(Empty, "Nix", Nothing, New D, (New D).init())
    WScript.StdOut.Write N() & TypeName(O) & " via nested Ifs ==> "
    If IsObject(O) Then
       If O Is Nothing Then
          R = "O Is Nothing"
       Else
          If IsObject(O.m_C) Then
             If O.m_C Is Nothing Then
                R = "O.m_C Is Nothing"
             Else
                If O.m_C.F() Then
                   R = "YES"
                Else
                   R = "NO"
                End If
             End If
          Else
             R = "O.m_C is not an object"
          End If
       End If
    Else
       R = "O is not an object"
    End If
    WScript.StdOut.WriteLine R

    WScript.StdOut.Write N() & TypeName(O) & " via Select Case False ==> "
    Select Case False
      Case IsObject(O)
        R = "O is not an object"
      Case Not O Is Nothing
        R = "O Is Nothing"
      Case IsObject(O.m_C)
        R = "O.m_C is not an object"
      Case Not O.m_C Is Nothing
        R = "O.m_C Is Nothing"
      Case Else
        If O.m_C.F() Then
           R = "YES"
        Else
           R = "SURPRISE"
        End If
    End Select
    WScript.StdOut.WriteLine R

    WScript.StdOut.Write N() & TypeName(O) & " via SHORT Select Case False ==> "
    Select Case True
      Case Not IsObject(O), O Is Nothing, Not IsObject(O.m_C), O.m_C Is Nothing
        R = "Something rotten"
      Case Else
        If O.m_C.F() Then
           R = "YES"
        Else
           R = "SURPRISE"
        End If
    End Select
    WScript.StdOut.WriteLine R

   On Error Resume Next
    If O Is Nothing Then R = "Surprise"
    If Err.Number Then WScript.Echo N(), Err.Number, Err.Description
   On Error GoTo 0

Next

output:

  1 Empty via nested Ifs ==> O is not an object
  2 Empty via Select Case False ==> O is not an object
  3 Empty via SHORT Select Case False ==> Something rotten
  4  424 Object required
  5 String via nested Ifs ==> O is not an object
  6 String via Select Case False ==> O is not an object
  7 String via SHORT Select Case False ==> Something rotten
  8  424 Object required
  9 Nothing via nested Ifs ==> O Is Nothing
 10 Nothing via Select Case False ==> O Is Nothing
 11 Nothing via SHORT Select Case False ==> Something rotten
 12 D via nested Ifs ==> O.m_C Is Nothing
 13 D via Select Case False ==> O.m_C Is Nothing
 14 D via SHORT Select Case False ==> Something rotten
 15 D via nested Ifs ==> C.F() called ==> YES
 16 D via Select Case False ==> C.F() called ==> YES
 17 D via SHORT Select Case False ==> C.F() called ==> YES

If you ignore output 4 and 8 and compare just the tripple 1-3, ... 15-17 and look at the correspondig code lines, you see

  1. Nested Ifs and Select Case are equivalent wrt the results
  2. If you are not interested in the details, the SHORT Select Case can filter all 'bad cases' in one line (order matters, though!), because the comma delimited list of expressions is short-circuited
  3. If you need the details, Select Case is easier to read/edit/augment

The flaw in Flakes' answer:

Output lines 4 and 8 show that the Is Nothing test will fail if applied to a non-object. So it must be guarded with an IsObject() check. Then the problem of combining checks will arise (which is completely ignored in that contribution).

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for pointing this out. I was not fully aware of "short circuiting" . Regarding guarding with an isObject() check, in this specific case, is not the Not (is nothing) check enough ? –  SearchAndResQ Nov 9 '12 at 14:02
    
@Flakes - no because Not O Is Nothing will throw an "Object Expected" error if O is not defined/Empty (output line 4, the 'bad case' the OT wants to avoid). –  Ekkehard.Horner Nov 9 '12 at 14:18
    
Thanks, just wanted to confirm that. –  SearchAndResQ Nov 9 '12 at 14:21
add comment

VBScript logical operators are not short-circuited. That means that both conditions will always be evaluated, no matter what (barring a run-time error, I suppose). Instead, you should structure your conditional as:

If IsObject(state.Item(level).Item(childRequires).Item("menu_state")) Then
    If state.Item(level).Item(childRequires).Item("menu_state") = "CHECKED" Then
        ... do some stuff
    End If
End If

Note, however, that according to your error, 'state.Item(...).Item(...)' is not an object. That means that you need to move your test up one level:

If IsObject(state.Item(level).Item(childRequires)) Then
    If state.Item(level).Item(childRequires).Item("menu_state") = "CHECKED" Then
        ... do some stuff
    End If
End If
share|improve this answer
    
Bingo! I would have never thought to try that. Nice to know more about how to read those errors. Thanks! –  user1601513 Nov 9 '12 at 14:25
add comment
If (NOT (state.Item(level).Item(childRequires).Item("menu_state") is NOTHING) )
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.