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Consider the requirement to strip invalid characters from a string. The characters just need to be removed and replace with blank or string.Empty.

char[] BAD_CHARS = new char[] { '!', '@', '#', '$', '%', '_' }; //simple example

foreach (char bad in BAD_CHARS)
{
    if (someString.Contains(bad))
      someString = someString.Replace(bad.ToString(), string.Empty);
}

I'd have really liked to do this:

if (BAD_CHARS.Any(bc => someString.Contains(bc)))
    someString.Replace(bc,string.Empty); // bc is out of scope

Question: Do you have any suggestions on refactoring this algoritm, or any simpler, easier to read, performant, maintainable algorithms?

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2  
I think the first one is simple, easy to read, and maintainable. –  Sean Bright Aug 25 '09 at 18:11
    
The first example has been fixed now, but the check for Contains is still redundant, and even then the algorithm isn't very efficient. –  Noldorin Aug 25 '09 at 18:18
    
Thanks Noldorin, appreciate your comments. In fact, this question is all about improving the algorithm. Thanks for the comments on its efficiencies! –  p.campbell Aug 25 '09 at 20:11

9 Answers 9

up vote 14 down vote accepted
char[] BAD_CHARS = new char[] { '!', '@', '#', '$', '%', '_' }; //simple example
someString = string.Concat(someString.Split(BAD_CHARS,StringSplitOption.RemoveEmptyEntries));

should do the trick (sorry for any smaller syntax errors I'm on my phone)

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This is a great suggestion! –  p.campbell Aug 26 '09 at 16:35

I don't know about the readability of it, but a regular expression could do what you need it to:

someString = Regex.Replace(someString, @"[!@#$%_]", "");
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1  
The regex should probably be either "[!@#$%_]" or "!|@|#|$|%|_". –  Daniel Brückner Aug 25 '09 at 18:31
2  
@Noldorin: I disagree. The assemblying of a new string will happen only once using the regex, and many times using a lot of Replace calls. Assemblying a new string implies allocating memory (= expensive), and Regex.Replace has better cache locality (= cheaper) –  Massa Aug 25 '09 at 18:51
5  
+1 Yay simplicitly! –  Anon246 Aug 25 '09 at 19:13
1  
@CasperT here are some bench marks (avg. over 1,000,000 iterations in milliseconds) Noldorin: 0,0072813432 (HashSet) RuneFS: 0,0030156636 (Split and concatenation) 28OZ28: 0,0091563672 (Hashing) CAbbot: 0,01132827 (RegEX) –  Rune FS Aug 26 '09 at 7:30
1  
Here are my benchmarks. Running over 2 Million iterations, using Stopwatch to get millisecond timings: List<char> = 7337. HashSet<char> = 4892. bool[] = 2940. BitArray = 3105. RegEx (compiled) = 8700. Smaller is better (obviously), and bool[] was the fastest (if not the most memory hungry). BitArray gives a very nice trade-off between speed and size. –  Erich Mirabal Aug 26 '09 at 12:24

The string class is immutable (although a reference type), hence all its static methods are designed to return a new string variable. Calling someString.Replace without assigning it to anything will not have any effect in your program. - Seems like you fixed this problem.

The main issue with your suggested algorithm is that it repeatedly assigning many new string variables, potentially causing a big performance hit. LINQ doesn't really help things here. (I doesn't make the code significantly shorter and certainly not any more readable, in my opinion.)

Try the following extension method. The key is the use of StringBuilder, which means only one block of memory is assigned for the result during execution.

private static readonly HashSet<char> badChars = 
    new HashSet<char> { '!', '@', '#', '$', '%', '_' };

public static string CleanString(this string str)
{
    var result = new StringBuilder(str.Length);
    for (int i = 0; i < str.Length; i++)
    {
        if (!badChars.Contains(str[i]))
            result.Append(str[i]);
    }
    return result.ToString();
}

This algorithm also makes use of the .NET 3.5 'HashSet' class to give O(1) look up time for detecting a bad char. This makes the overall algorithm O(n) rather than the O(nm) of your posted one (m being the number of bad chars); it also is lot a better with memory usage, as explained above.

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4  
If you use a hashtable/dictionary to store the bad characters, the lookup would be O(1) instead of O(m). That could also allow for a custom replacement of the character (i.e. if he wanted to replace '@' with 'at' instead of '' in the future). –  Erich Mirabal Aug 25 '09 at 18:21
    
@Erich: Good point. I'll edit my code to use that instead. –  Noldorin Aug 25 '09 at 18:22
1  
@Adam: Obfuscated - how so? To me this code is both perfectly clear and very efficient. See my comment on the other post for why not to use RegEx. –  Noldorin Aug 25 '09 at 18:38
1  
Also. Just a small comment. You have to use str.Length in your loop - not the stringbuilder :) it doesn't work that way –  CasperT Aug 25 '09 at 19:06
1  
@Rune FS: I'd like to see your numbers that give you that result. I just tried it with both the list and hashset implementation, and the hashset was always faster (it took 1/2 to 2/3 of the time of the list). My nm was the base string he gave (i.e. both the input and badchar were the same size -- 6 characters long) so it was very low as you claim. –  Erich Mirabal Aug 25 '09 at 19:40

This one is faster than HashSet<T>. Also, if you have to perform this action often, please consider the foundations for this question I asked here.

private static readonly bool[] BadCharValues;

static StaticConstructor()
{
    BadCharValues = new bool[char.MaxValue+1];
    char[] badChars = { '!', '@', '#', '$', '%', '_' };
    foreach (char c in badChars)
        BadCharValues[c] = true;
}

public static string CleanString(string str)
{
    var result = new StringBuilder(str.Length);
    for (int i = 0; i < str.Length; i++)
    {
        if (!BadCharValues[str[i]])
            result.Append(str[i]);
    }
    return result.ToString();
}
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You basically created an expanded version of the hashset where you are guaranteed no collisions and no need to compute a hash value since the hash value is the character value. +1 since it is faster without paying a big memory penalty. –  Erich Mirabal Aug 25 '09 at 21:36
    
(for the curious: this is still faster than using a BitArray, even though bool[] takes up a bit (ahem) more space) –  Erich Mirabal Aug 25 '09 at 21:48
1  
The memory penalty is significant, but indeed this uses an optimised version of the HashSet. Oh, and thanks for copying my code without attribute. –  Noldorin Aug 26 '09 at 10:12
    
a 65K lookup table with only 6 entries of note will almost certainly perform worse than a hash based approach due to the memory pressure on your cache. If it's compile time known write it as a switch statement and be done with it... –  ShuggyCoUk Sep 1 '09 at 0:12

Something to consider -- if this is for passwords (say), you want to scan for and keep good characters, and assume everything else is bad. Its easier to correctly filter or good things, then try to guess all bad things.

For Each Character If Character is Good -> Keep it (copy to out buffer, whatever.)

jeff

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if you still want to do it in a LINQy way:

public static string CleanUp(this string orig)
{
    var badchars = new List<char>() { '!', '@', '#', '$', '%', '_' };

    return new string(orig.ToCharArray().Where(c => !badchars.Contains(c)).ToArray());
}
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You don't need the ToCharArray at all :) Remove it and the code still works as it should. –  CasperT Aug 25 '09 at 19:10
    
And you can use a HashSet instead of a List. –  Robert Rossney Aug 25 '09 at 21:16

Why would you have REALLY LIKED to do that? The code is absolutely no simpler, you're just forcing a query extension method into your code.

As an aside, the Contains check seems redundant, both conceptually and from a performance perspective. Contains has to run through the whole string anyway, you may as well just call Replace(bad.ToString(), string.Empty) for every character and forget about whether or not it's actually present.

Of course, a regular expression is always an option, and may be more performant (if not less clear) in a situation like this.

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good point, thanks Adam! –  p.campbell Aug 25 '09 at 19:39

Extra tip: If you don't want to remember the array of char that are invalid for Files, you could use Path.GetInvalidFileNameChars(). If you wanted it for Paths, it's Path.GetInvalidPathChars

private static string RemoveInvalidChars(string str)
            {
                return string.Concat(str.Split(Path.GetInvalidFileNameChars(), StringSplitOptions.RemoveEmptyEntries));
            }
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This is pretty clean. Restricts it to valid characters instead of removing invalid ones. You should split it to constants probably:

string clean = new string(@"Sour!ce Str&*(@ing".Where(c => 
@"abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ ,.".Contains(c)).ToArray()
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1  
Why the down-vote?? –  uosɐſ Sep 18 '09 at 18:55

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