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I've created two classes and I'm trying to test them but I'm getting the following error and cant for the life of me see whats wrong.

The idea is to use these classes as a module then grab input from the user to populate the arguments, but for now I'm just testing the classes.

Error

File "./Employees.py", line 38, in <module>
emp1Atr.displayAttributes()
AttributeError: Attribute instance has no attribute 'displayAttributes'

Code below

#!/usr/bin/python

class Employee:
    'Practice class'
    empCount = 0

    def __init__(self, salary):
            self.salary = salary
            Employee.empCount += 1
    def displayCount(self):
            print "Total Employees %d" % Employee.empCount

    def displayEmployee(self):
            print "Salary: ", self.salary


class Attribute(Employee):
    'Defines attributes for Employees'
    def __init__(self, Age, Name, Sex):

            def Age(self):
                    self.Age = Age

            def Name(self):
                    self.Name = Name

            def Sex(self):
                    self.Sex = Sex

            def displayAttributes(self):
                    print "Name: ", self.Name + "\nAge: ", self.Age + "\nSex: ", self.Sex


emp1Sal = Employee(2000)
emp1Atr = Attribute(12, "John", "man")

emp1Sal.displayEmployee()
emp1Atr.displayAttributes()
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3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted
#!/usr/bin/python
class Employee:

'Practice class'
empCount = 0

def __init__(self, salary = None): #made salary as an optional argument
        self.salary = salary
        Employee.empCount += 1
def displayCount(self):
        print "Total Employees %d" % Employee.empCount

def displayEmployee(self):
        print "Salary: ", self.salary


class Attribute(Employee):
    'Defines attributes for Employees'
    def __init__(self, Age, Name, Sex):
        Employee.__init__(self) #Calling the parent class init method
        #Assigning Attribute the values passed in the __init__ method

        self.Age = Age
        self.Name = Name
        self.Sex = Sex  
#Making a class method which is why it is intended out of the init method
#This was the reason you got the first error of display attributes
def displayAttributes(self):
print "Name: ", self.Name + "\nAge: ", self.Age , "\nSex: ", self.Sex #Changed the + to ',' between self.Age and "\nSex"


emp1Sal = Employee(2000)
emp1Atr = Attribute(12, "John", "man")

emp1Sal.displayEmployee()
emp1Atr.displayAttributes()
share|improve this answer
    
I dont see the difference sorry –  k3eper Nov 8 '12 at 23:44
    
Please take a look. I have updated the entire thing –  Raunak Agarwal Nov 8 '12 at 23:46
    
Thanks for the response, could you please explain what you did, ive only been learning a few days so im a nub :( –  k3eper Nov 8 '12 at 23:48
    
It works as Im sure you are aware but Im none the wiser :( –  k3eper Nov 8 '12 at 23:51
    
Updated the code with comments take a look –  Raunak Agarwal Nov 8 '12 at 23:55
show 5 more comments

If that is a proper copy paste, then your indentation in the Attribute class is one too deep. All methods after the __init__(self) are indented as if they where local methods inside of __init__(self) instead of the object. So if you outdent them properly and set the attributes age, name and sex in __init__() properly, it should work.

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I did think it was to far indented but I get an error if i dont indent it –  k3eper Nov 8 '12 at 23:36
    
File "./Employees.py", line 21 def Age(self): ^ IndentationError: expected an indented block –  k3eper Nov 8 '12 at 23:37
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Ok i just retried it with out the call to the parent and it works. Could you please explain why you added that line?

New Code

#!/usr/bin/python

class Employee:
    'Practice class'
    empCount = 0

    def __init__(self, salary):
            self.salary = salary
            Employee.empCount += 1
    def displayCount(self):
            print "Total Employees %d" % Employee.empCount

    def displayEmployee(self):
            print "Salary: ", self.salary


class Att(Employee):
    'Defines attributes for Employees'
    def __init__(self, Age, Name, Sex):
            self.Age = Age
            self.Name = Name
            self.Sex = Sex

    def display(self):
            print "Name: ", self.Name + "\nAge: ", self.Age,  "\nSex: ", self.Sex


emp1Atr = Att(12, "Da", "man")


emp1Atr.display()
share|improve this answer
    
Ok so when defining the init arguments It must be in the same instance, it cant be in a different def? That makes sense doh! –  k3eper Nov 9 '12 at 0:06
    
Well its not required but just a good practice so, that you can propagate the arguments to the parents. –  Raunak Agarwal Nov 9 '12 at 0:13
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