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I´ve just seen multidimensional arrays and as practice I first wanted to print out a string with this code; alas it didn´t work.

#include <stdio.h>
main()
{
 char a[][20] = {"Hello"};
 printf("%s" , a [1]);
 getchar();
}

The only way I managed doing this was with a adding each character with a loop:

#include <stdio.h> 
main()
{
char a[] = {"Hello"};
int i=0
while(a[i]!='\0')
 {
  printf("%c" , a[i]);
   i++;
  }
getchar();
}

What am I missing when initialising the string?

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2  
printf("%s" , a [0]); –  mcabral Nov 9 '12 at 0:50

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In the first fragment, you are accessing memory that's out of bounds. The code that would work is:

#include <stdio.h>
int main(void)
{
    char a[][20] = {"Hello"};
    printf("%s\n", a[0]);
    getchar();
}

C arrays are indexed from zero. You only defined and initialized a[0]; therefore, accessing a[1] is undefined behaviour.

In your second example, you could use "%s" OK:

#include <stdio.h> 
int main(void)
{
    char a[] = {"Hello"};
    printf("%s\n", a);
    getchar();
}

Or you could use:

    printf("%s\n", &a[0]);

This is, of course, a single dimensional array.

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Isn't &a[0] redundant? &(&a[0])[0] ? –  mcabral Nov 9 '12 at 0:56
    
Yes, &a[0] is redundant in this context. If you had successive uses of &a[0], &a[3], &a[6], and &a[9], the symmetry of using &a[0] in lieu of a makes sense. The compiler will almost certainly generate the same code regardless of which notation you use; it won't add 0 to the address. –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 9 '12 at 1:51
    
Indeed it is a single dimensional array, I forgot to take in mind how arrays are indexed in C, thanks for the effort in showing me the correctly way though it is not neccesary in this example where I can leave it as you mentioned before since it is just one element in the array. –  Yudop Nov 10 '12 at 4:17

Alternatively you can use the pointer notation too.

#include <stdio.h>
int main(void)
{
    char a[][20] = {"Hello"};
    printf("%s\n", *( a + 0 ) );
    getchar();
}
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