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I have a pulse every nth(random) sec and i would like to in the bottom of my div[id=item] to draw/plot a little graph making the pulse visual. I was thinking of generating a Gaussian bell whenever it pulses, but for this example plotting 0 and 1 is fine. The pulse comes at some time t, so depending on what is best the data can be an array of times or a array of the value at each 1/10 sec.

Every 1/10sec a new value is added to data1 if the this is the chosen way, or else data2 will get added a value when ever it pulses. I would like the plot to be updated live so the old pulses moves left, so the new pulse enters from the right of the div.

Anyone got some code or ideas where to start, and also suggestions on performance of doing this.

<script>
var data1 = [0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1];
var data2 = [{1,2,3,4,5,];
</script>

    <div id="item" style="width:200px;height:100px"></div>

UPDATE 1 I am now drawing on the canvas. Any good ideas on how to make it update/animate ?

share|improve this question
1  
Highcharts might be a great solution for you. It's generally a great library, and works well for just about every browser (including IE7/8/9). Here's a specific example of a dynamic chart that draws a spline through a series of points, and updates at regular intervals (dropping off older points): highcharts.com/demo/dynamic-update. – mattstuehler Nov 9 '12 at 0:54
    
If you're looking to create your own solution instead of a heavy external library, and you're targeting only HTML5-capable browsers, I'd suggest using the canvas element (diveintohtml5.info/canvas.html). I find it much easier to use than SVG. If you actually need help writing the code to produce the chart - let me know. Otherwise, good luck! – mattstuehler Nov 9 '12 at 0:56
    
I think im going with the future and who ever, if ever it will become a public service, wants to use it will just have to have newest browser :) I think canvas sounds good. Not a big fan of large external libs for simple things. Thanks for your comment – pksorensen Nov 9 '12 at 1:00
    
Do i need to redraw it at every update or can i do something smart? – pksorensen Nov 9 '12 at 1:44
1  
It is possible to erase areas of a canvas element, and theoretically possible to "move" visualizations by applying matrix transformations. That said, I find it generally much easier to clear and redraw the canvas at regular intervals, or when the data changes. Drawing to the canvas is incredibly fast (assuming a reasonable amount of data), so it's not as problematic as you'd think. Used in concert with requestanimationframe, you can get VERY smooth animation with dynamic charts... – mattstuehler Nov 9 '12 at 2:36

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