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I have created a new branch from an existing branch:

git checkout master
git checkout -b test

then in the new branch I've renamed a file:

git mv foo.txt fooOld.txt
git mv fooNew.txt foo.txt
git commit -am "Rename file"

meanwhile someone else has edited the fooNew.txt on the master branch and pushed the changes:

git co master
echo "Some changes" >> fooNew.txt
git commit -am "Do some important changes"
git push origin master

now when I try and pull in the changes from master I get an error:

CONFLICT (modify/delete): fooNew.txt deleted in HEAD and modified in master.

how can I merge these 2 branches so that I end up with a foo.txt file containing the changes done to fooNew.txt on master?

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1  
Did you merge test to your master before the git pull command? If not, merge master to test, resolve conflict, then merge back to master. If already merged then you need to revert your master to previous commit beforehand. –  JScoobyCed Nov 9 '12 at 1:19
1  
Did you try to rebase? git pull --rebase origin master –  iltempo Nov 9 '12 at 1:20
    
Thanks, I've tried git pull --rebase origin master and merging test to master first but I still get the same issue, a conflict that can either be resolved by saving the modified foo.txt file or deleting it. I've also tried rebasing master with test but no luck... –  tempestSA Nov 9 '12 at 3:32
    
I gave up and did a merge, saved the modified file and then did a manual merge to pull in all changes between fooNew.txt and foo.txt (and then deleting fooNew.txt once I was done). But I am quite interested if there is a solution that doesn't involve manual merging. –  tempestSA Nov 9 '12 at 4:40
    
Interesting read: stackoverflow.com/questions/11331494/… –  VonC Nov 9 '12 at 8:02

1 Answer 1

Using your method, I had no problem.

$ git checkout -b test
Switched to a new branch 'test'

$ git mv foo.txt fooOld.txt

$ git mv fooNew.txt foo.txt

$ git commit -am "Rename file"
[test bf82f6d] Rename file
 1 files changed, 0 insertions(+), 0 deletions(-)
 rename fooNew.txt => fooOld.txt (100%)

$ git checkout master
Switched to branch 'master'

$ echo "Some changes" >> fooNew.txt

$ git commit -am "Do some important changes"
[master 653c0df] Do some important changes
 1 files changed, 1 insertions(+), 0 deletions(-)

$ git checkout test
Switched to branch 'test'

$ git merge master
Auto-merging fooOld.txt
Merge made by the 'recursive' strategy.
 fooOld.txt |    1 +
 1 files changed, 1 insertions(+), 0 deletions(-)
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