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I found this site which was describing a very simple user authentication for LINQ to SQL as at codesamplez.com.

My data in the Database looks like this

| id  | name | password |
+-----+------+----------+
| 1   | tic  | test     |
| 2   | tac  | test     |
| 3   | toe  | test     |

For some strange reason the data doesnt validate as I expect, when I call

 bool b  = IsValidUser("tic" , "test");

this returns FALSE, But any time I pass the same Username and password combination

 bool b  = IsValidUser("tic" , "tic");

or

 bool b  = IsValidUser("a" , "a");

or

 bool b  = IsValidUser("b" , "b");

it returns true!

below is the code which is basically identical to the referenced page.

public bool IsValidUser(string userName, string passWord)
{
    DataClasses1DataContext db = new DataClasses1DataContext();
    var users = from u in db.Users
                      where u.name == userName
                      && u.password == passWord
                      select u;

    return Enumerable.Count(users) > 0;
}

Update: The User class:

[global::System.Data.Linq.Mapping.TableAttribute(Name="dbo.Users")]
public partial class User
{
    private int _id;
    private string _name;
    private string _password;

    public User()
    {
    }

    [global::System.Data.Linq.Mapping.ColumnAttribute(Storage="_id", DbType="Int NOT NULL")]
    public int id
    {
        get
        {
            return this._id;
        }
        set
        {
            if ((this._id != value))
            {
                this._id = value;
            }
        }
    }

    [global::System.Data.Linq.Mapping.ColumnAttribute(Storage="_name", DbType="NChar(10)")]
    public string name
    {
        get
        {
            return this._name;
        }
        set
        {
            if ((this._name != value))
            {
                this._name = value;
            }
        }
    }

    [global::System.Data.Linq.Mapping.ColumnAttribute(Storage="_password", DbType="NChar(10)")]
    public string password
    {
        get
        {
            return this._password;
        }
        set
        {
            if ((this._password != value))
            {
                this._password = value;
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question

closed as too localized by IEnumerable, Kirk Woll, Jon Adams, Praveen Kumar, bmargulies Nov 10 '12 at 18:02

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
It looks like it should work to me; how did you create your data context and entity classes? Did you use sqlmetal.exe against your database? I ask, because the only way I can imagine your code failing is if the [Column] attribute on your password property is mapped to the wrong column (i.e. to the username column). –  Kirk Woll Nov 9 '12 at 3:06
1  
side note: I would wrap your DataClasses1DataContext in a 'using' statement since that object is disposable. –  Hardrada Nov 9 '12 at 3:12
    
no I just use the default from VSExpress when I created the ADO.NET database –  IEnumerable Nov 9 '12 at 3:12
2  
have you manually inspected the users object in the debugger to see if what you expect is the actual? I just get this feeling that the source of the data is somehow not from the db you think it's using. Ex: ASP.NET using local db and making modifications to the db would often be overwritten on publish with an older version of the db. Just a thought since you haven't specified what env you're dev'ing for.. –  Hardrada Nov 9 '12 at 3:22
1  
Thanks everyone, all very helpful info now. It was my own mistake here, the Database didnt have the data I expected in it. I had 2 database servers and the new data hadnt replicated over to the development server. –  IEnumerable Nov 9 '12 at 3:27

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Thanks everyone, all very helpful info now. It was my own mistake here, the Database didnt have the data I expected in it. I had 2 database servers and the new data hadnt replicated over to the development server.

share|improve this answer

Try this:

public bool IsValidUser(string userName, string passWord)
{
    using (var db = ...)
    {
        ...
        return users.Any();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I just made this same lecture to Leon Newswanger (deleted below). Do we have to go over this again? :) (i.e. there is no chance whatsoever this answer will help the OP resolve his question) –  Kirk Woll Nov 9 '12 at 3:25

Try this,

public bool IsValidUser(string userName, string passWord)
{
    DataClasses1DataContext db = new DataClasses1DataContext();
    return db.Users.Any(u => u.name == userName && u.password == passWord);
}
share|improve this answer
    
For the 3rd time, the OP's use of particular extension methods cannot conceivably produce different results. –  Kirk Woll Nov 9 '12 at 3:29
    
Just what difference do you think .Any(...) vs .Count() > 0 will possibly produce? –  Kirk Woll Nov 9 '12 at 3:30
    
@ Kirk Woll, Both are Same, But rather than finding the users and checking for count, you can use ANY, It is looks good interms of redability and speed. –  Prasad Kanaparthi Nov 9 '12 at 3:34
    
of course it does. But if your answer will not help the OP solve his problem, it should be a comment. Otherwise, you pollute the answers with noise and even worse, run the risk of your "answer" being upvoted by the unwary, and annihilating the OP's hopes of getting his question seen by the hordes of "unanswered questions" viewers. –  Kirk Woll Nov 9 '12 at 3:36
    
@Kirk Woll, Do you think, you are expecting me the give exact answer (IEnumerable Said, Thanks everyone, all very helpful info now. It was my own mistake here, the Database didnt have the data I expected in it. I had 2 database servers and the new data hadnt replicated over to the development server.). I suggested instead query and count use ANY.. it is straight forward. I didn't understand wht your trying to educate me here. –  Prasad Kanaparthi Nov 9 '12 at 3:41

Not sure what your issue is, but this should get you more info:

public bool IsValidUser(string userName, string passWord)
{

    DataClasses1DataContext db = new DataClasses1DataContext();
    db.Log = System.IO.StringWriter(New StringBuilder());

    var users = from u in db.Users
                where u.name == userName
                && u.password == passWord
                select u;

    int userCount = users.Count();
    bool isSuccess = userCount > 0;

    return isSuccess;   //Breakpoint here, check the contents of db.Log
}

If you put a break point on the return then you can examine userCount and isSuccess. You can also check db.Log to see what query was run.

If this does not solve your problem then please update your question with the value of these three variables at the return.

Update I just saw your update. Sounds like you are referencing the wrong IsValidUser method. I would go to where you are calling it, right click on IsValidUser and select "Go To Definition" to verify the correct method is being called. Also, verify that your using the latest build.

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