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I was experimenting with the const keyword and trying to get an useful approach from it.

#include <iostream>

class A
{
  public:
  static const void modify(float& dummy)
  {
    dummy = 1.5f;
  }  
};

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
  auto a = 49.5f;

  A::modify(a);

  std::cout << a << std::endl; 

  return(0);
}

this code compiles and works, the output is 1.5, I was expecting an error from the compiler because I have a const method that is trying to modify the value of an argument.

What I'm missing here ? How i can design methods that will not modify argument's values?

share|improve this question
    
Huh, I didn't know you could apply const to void. –  chris Nov 9 '12 at 6:01
    
actually you mean static const void modify(const float& dummy)? in this case, you can't modify dummy –  billz Nov 9 '12 at 6:02
    
@chris How i can write a similar method that can keep my arguments constant ? why I don't get the warning ? –  user1802174 Nov 9 '12 at 6:02
    
Hey, look what I get from GCC: warning: type qualifiers ignored on function return type [-Wignored-qualifiers] –  chris Nov 9 '12 at 6:02
    
@billz yes, but my doubt is about the use of const for the type of the method itself. –  user1802174 Nov 9 '12 at 6:03
show 6 more comments

2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted
  1. The method you declared is not const. It returns a const void (whatever that is), but it is not a const-method itself.

  2. If it were declared

    void modify(float& dummy) const
    

    it would be a const-method, but then still it could modify the value of the argument, because a const-method is allowed to do this. The only thing it is not allowed to do is to modify values of members of the class it belongs to.

  3. Note that in order to declare a const method, I had to remove the static specification. A static method can never be const, because a static method can't modify any members anyway.

  4. If you want to prevent the function from modifying its argument, you'd have to make the argument const:

    static void modify(const float& dummy)
    

To illustrate what a const-method can and cannot do, here is a class that has a member, and a const-function:

class A
{
  float my_member;
public:
  void modify(float& dummy) const
  {
    my_member = dummy; // attempt to modify member -> illegal
    dummy = 1.5f;      // modifies a non-const argument -> ok
  }  
};

As you can see, it cannot modify a member, but it can modify the value of its argument. If you want to prevent that, you need to make the argument const:

class A
{
  float my_member;
public:
  void modify(const float& dummy) const
  {
    my_member = dummy; // attempt to modify member -> illegal
    dummy = 1.5f;      // attempt to modify a const reference -> illegal
  }  
};
share|improve this answer
    
so the point 4 is the only solution for this and all the void methods ? –  user1802174 Nov 9 '12 at 6:10
    
No its to prevent argument modifying. –  Denis Ermolin Nov 9 '12 at 6:11
1  
@user1802174, It's the only solution for every function. The return type has nothing to do with it. –  chris Nov 9 '12 at 6:11
    
@chris i was convinced that the use of const could put every argument in a safe. probably it's not ... –  user1802174 Nov 9 '12 at 6:14
1  
I know, I wasn't puzzled; it makes good sense to not define a special case for 'const void' in the standard. But that doesn't mean that compilers shouldn't warn for something like that, even if strictly speaking, it's "standards compliant". –  Nik Bougalis Nov 9 '12 at 6:37
show 3 more comments

You are misunderstanding what 'const' does in this case and how it operates.

First of all, in C++ static member functions cannot be const. The function you show returns a type of 'const void' (whether this makes sense and whether the compiler should warn is another topic).

Second of all the parameter you are changing isn't const. If 'modify' wasn't a static function and had a 'const' modifier on the function, dummy could still be modified:

void modify_nonstatic(float &dummy) const
{
    dummy = 1.5f; // perfectly fine - dummy isn't a member of
                  // the class and can be modified
}

If you want the parameter to be const, make the parameter const:

static void modify(const float &dummy) 
{
    dummy = 1.5f; // fail! you can't modify a const.
}

void modify_nonstatic(const float &dummy)
{
    dummy = 1.5f; // fail! you can't modify a const.
}
share|improve this answer
    
thanks, unfortunately due to my low reputation I can't upvote this, but it's a good response, thanks. –  user1802174 Nov 9 '12 at 6:28
    
No worries - it isn't about the upvotes; it's about the questions and the answers. –  Nik Bougalis Nov 9 '12 at 6:29
    
+1 (we must have typed our answers at almost the same time) –  jogojapan Nov 9 '12 at 6:36
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