Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I Need to return a class name from a class that calls method f. How can i do it without inheritance? And... is it possible?!

I'm using Ruby 1.9.2.

class B
  def f
    #need return class A
  end
end

class A
  attr_reader :a
  def initialize()
    @a = B.new
  end
end

A.new.a.f #=> A
share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by sawa, KooKiz, stealthyninja, Praveen Kumar, Graviton Nov 12 '12 at 2:00

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

3 Answers 3

You can do something like this:

class B
  def f
    @blabla.class.name
  end
  def initialize(obj)
    @blabla=obj
  end
end
class A
  attr_reader :a
  def initialize()
    @a = B.new(self)
  end
end

A.new.a.f
    => "A"
share|improve this answer
1  
Could you please prettify your code and remove that IRB noise? :) –  Sergio Tulentsev Nov 9 '12 at 8:23
    
It works, but I was curious to find out a solution without passing an object to initialize. I would not want to initialize an object passing in the instance. –  facetostool Nov 9 '12 at 11:07
    
See my response below: You can reference A directly. –  Gregory Brown Nov 9 '12 at 13:49

An alternative version of davidrac's solution, except it's using binding. Sorry for my poor knowledge of binding, here I may use it incorrectly, somebody please then edit it, thx. Sorry that in my case you still have to pass at least the binding.

class B
  def initialize(caller_class)
    @caller_class = caller_class
  end

  def f
    @caller_class
  end
end

class A
  attr_reader :a

  def initialize()
    @a = B.new(self.class)
  end
end

puts A.new.a.f  #=> A

Apart from this, I think you can also make use of:

set_trace_func lambda { |event, file, line, id, binding, classname| #do sth with classname }

or try dirty hack with

caller(0).last.match(/:(\d+):/)[1] # get the line number of caller, then get the class

But this doesn't work if you call A.new.a.f separately in two lines

share|improve this answer
    
A binding is not the same thing as a class, so you're mixing terminology here. Here's more on bindings: ruby-doc.org/core-1.9.3/Binding.html –  Gregory Brown Nov 9 '12 at 14:08
    
thanks for correction @GregoryBrown (seacreature) :) –  Jing Li Nov 9 '12 at 14:25

Are you looking to literally return the class A, or are you looking to dynamically determine the class of the caller? If the latter, there isn't a safe way to do it without very weird hacks on the Ruby internals, and so it is usually a better idea to change your design to work around this constraint (usually by injecting into the constructor or adding an accessor, as other answers suggest). But if you want to explicitly return the class A, it's an easy answer...

Classes are objects in Ruby, stored in constants. Constants within method bodies are not evaluated until the methods are called, so in this case you can simply return A from your method:

class B
  def f
    A
  end
end

class A
  attr_reader :a
  def initialize()
    @a = B.new
  end
end

A.new.a.f #=> A
share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.