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I have the task to write own containers Linked_list and Array_list. I have one interface for them:

typedef int value_type;
class Container 
{
public:
        class Iterator 
        {   
        public:
            Iterator();
            Iterator(value_type* other);
            Iterator(const Iterator& other);
            Iterator& operator=(const Iterator& other);
                    ...
        };

    Container();
    Container(const Container& other);
    ~Container();   

    virtual value_type& front() const=0;
    virtual value_type& back() const=0;
    virtual Iterator begin() const=0; // 
    ...
};

I did derived classes Linked_list and Array_list:

class Linked_list:public Container 
{
public:
    long int cur_size;
    List elem;
    static Link end_;
    class Iterator: public Container::Iterator
    {
        friend Linked_list;
        Link *p;    
    };

    Iterator begin() const; //overriding virtual function return type differs ...

...
}

I thinks it's all wrong. should nested class Linked_list::Iterator be a derived class? Is it possible to do this, if I can't change the interface?

share|improve this question
    
Are you allowed to change typedef int value_type; because then you could make it a template by changing it to template <class value_type> and changing your derived class to be specific type of the template. –  DjSol Nov 9 '12 at 8:21
1  
Why do you think it's all wrong? The way you organised the classes seems to make sense. –  jogojapan Nov 9 '12 at 8:22
    
I can't change this. And it's supposed that I must do it without using templates.Sorry for my English –  greensher Nov 9 '12 at 8:26
    
It seems to me that it is correct, but what I don't understand is why you have a Linked_list and a Link inside Linked_list::Iterator. –  Lucia Pasarin Nov 9 '12 at 8:33
1  
The override of begin in Linked_list is not valid, because the return type is different and is also not acceptable as a covariant return type (for that it would need to be a pointer). –  Bart van Ingen Schenau Nov 9 '12 at 8:46

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Taking into account your design constraints that you cannot use templates, than one thing should change: add interface IteratorImpl. Thus you can make class Iterator from base class Container non virtual. It needs to be non-virtual since STL-alike iterators should have value semantics. See pimpl idiom for more details how it works!

Like this:

typedef int value_type;
class Container 
{
    protected:
        class IteratorImpl
        {   
        public:
            virtual void next() = 0;
            virtual IteratorImpl* clone() const = 0;
            virtual value_type get() const = 0;
            virtual bool isEqual(const IteratorImpl& other) const = 0;
        };

    public:
        class Iterator 
        {   
        public:
            Iterator(IteratorImpl* impl) : impl(impl) {}
            ~Iterator() { delete impl; }
            Iterator(const Iterator& other) : impl(other.impl->clone()) {}
            Iterator& operator=(const Iterator& other) {
              IteratorImpl* oldImpl = impl;
              impl = other.impl->clone();
              delete oldImpl;
            }
            bool operator == (const Iterator& other) const 
            {
               return impl->isEqual(*other->impl);
            }
            Iterator& operator ++ ()
            {
                impl->next();
                return *this;
            }
            value_type& operator*() const 
            {
               return impl->get();
            }
            value_type* operator->() const
            {
               return &impl->get();
            }
        };
        Container();
        Container(const Container& other);
        ~Container();   

    virtual value_type& front() const=0;
    virtual value_type& back() const=0;
    virtual Iterator begin() const=0; // 
    ...
    };

Then in your derived just implement IteratorImpl:

class Linked_list:public Container 
{
protected:
    class IteratorImpl: public Container::IteratorImpl
    {
       ....
    };

public:
    Iterator begin() const { return new IteratorImpl(firstNode); }
    Iterator end() const { return new IteratorImpl(nodeAfterLastNode); }

...
};

These firstNode and nodeAfterLastNode are just my guess - use whatever you need to implement the IteratorImpl interface...

share|improve this answer
    
+1 as you managed to keep value semantics on iterators! –  Matthieu M. Nov 9 '12 at 9:35
    
thanks a lot!) I think I begin to understand) –  greensher Nov 9 '12 at 11:48
    
virtual IteratorImpl* clone() const = 0; ? –  greensher Nov 9 '12 at 12:03
    
@greensher - Yes, thanks, will correct –  PiotrNycz Nov 9 '12 at 12:06
    
@PiotrNycz - can I ask stupid question: what should I do with functions like: Linked_list::Iterator Linked_list::erase(Iterator pos) ? –  greensher Nov 9 '12 at 13:03

You should define a const_value_type to represent const value_type, and use it for the return values of the front and back virtual methods. Alternatively you can drop the const qualifiers on these methods, because having non const reference return types on const methods doesn't make sense.

Without more details on the classes, it's difficult to tell for the rest. You could also have a look at early implementations of the STL: it's a very good way to get some insight on these topics.

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