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Is it possible to sort and rearrange an array that looks like this:

itemsArray = [ 
    ['Anne', 'a'],
    ['Bob', 'b'],
    ['Henry', 'b'],
    ['Andrew', 'd'],
    ['Jason', 'c'],
    ['Thomas', 'b']
]

to match the arrangement of this array:

sortingArr = [ 'b', 'c', 'b', 'b', 'a', 'd' ]

Unfortunately, I don’t have any IDs to keep track on. I would need to priority the items-array to match the sortingArr as close as possible.

Update:

Here is the output I’m looking for:

itemsArray = [    
    ['Bob', 'b'],
    ['Jason', 'c'],
    ['Henry', 'b'],
    ['Thomas', 'b']
    ['Anne', 'a'],
    ['Andrew', 'd'],
]

Any idea how this can be done?

share|improve this question
    
If you don't want to do everything manually, take a look at the array function sin PHP.js. – Adi Nov 9 '12 at 8:36
    
Only by looping over the sortingArray and rewrite the itemsArray – mplungjan Nov 9 '12 at 8:36
2  
missed a in sortingArr? – chumkiu Nov 9 '12 at 8:46
1  
Where multiple arrays have the same sorting value (i.e. 'b') how do you decide which item goes where in the sorted array? With 'Bob', 'Henry' and 'Thomas' which all have the value 'b' - how do you decide which goes first, third and fourth? – Mitch Satchwell Nov 9 '12 at 8:52
    
@chumkiu ops. corrected :S – user1448892 Nov 9 '12 at 8:53
up vote 21 down vote accepted

Something like:

items = [ 
    ['Anne', 'a'],
    ['Bob', 'b'],
    ['Henry', 'b'],
    ['Andrew', 'd'],
    ['Jason', 'c'],
    ['Thomas', 'b']
]

sorting = [ 'b', 'c', 'b', 'b', 'c', 'd' ];
result = []

sorting.forEach(function(key) {
    var found = false;
    items = items.filter(function(item) {
        if(!found && item[1] == key) {
            result.push(item);
            found = true;
            return false;
        } else 
            return true;
    })
})

result.forEach(function(item) {
    document.writeln(item[0]) /// Bob Jason Henry Thomas Andrew
})

Here's a shorter code, but it destroys the sorting array:

result = items.map(function(item) {
    var n = sorting.indexOf(item[1]);
    sorting[n] = '';
    return [n, item]
}).sort().map(function(j) { return j[1] })
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you! Works perfect. – user1448892 Nov 9 '12 at 9:23
3  
Quadratic complexity! Try it with a big amount of data… – Julien Royer Nov 9 '12 at 9:27
1  
@JulienRoyer: c2.com/cgi/wiki?PrematureOptimization – georg Nov 9 '12 at 9:29
3  
@thg435: complexity has little to do with "optimization", unless the volume of data is guaranteed to be small (which may be the case here). – Julien Royer Nov 9 '12 at 9:36
1  
Great solution. Really helped me out on my own project. Thank you. – jmchauv Oct 28 '14 at 15:52

Case 1: Original Question (No Libraries)

Plenty of other answers that work. :)

Case 2: Original Question (Lodash.js or Underscore.js)

var groups = _.groupBy(itemArray, 1);
var result = _.map(sortArray, function (i) { return groups[i].shift(); });

Case 3: Sort Array1 as if it were Array2

I'm guessing that most people came here looking for an equivalent to PHP's array_multisort (I did) so I thought I'd post that answer as well. If you're able to use a JS library, there are a couple options:

  1. There's an existing JS implementation of array_multisort(). Thanks to @Adnan for pointing it out in the comments. It is pretty large, though.

  2. Lodash.js or Underscore.js (both popular, smaller libraries that focus on performance) offer helper functions that allow you to do this:

    var result = _.chain(sortArray)
      .pairs()
      .sortBy(1)
      .map(function (i) { return itemArray[i[0]]; })
      .value();
    

...Which will (1) group the sortArray into [index, value] pairs, (2) sort them by the value (you can also provide a callback here), (3) replace each of the pairs with the item from the itemArray at the index the pair originated from.

share|improve this answer

If you use the native array sort function, you can pass in a custom comparator to be used when sorting the array. The comparator should return a negative number if the first value is less than the second, zero if they're equal, and a positive number if the first value is greater.

So if I understand the example you're giving correctly, you could do something like:

function sortFunc(a, b) {
  var sortingArr = [ 'b', 'c', 'b', 'b', 'c', 'd' ];
  return sortingArr.indexOf(a[1]) - sortingArr.indexOf(b[1]);
}

itemsArray.sort(sortFunc);
share|improve this answer
    
That won't work, the resulting order would be b,b,b,c,c,d as indexOf returns the first index. – Mitch Satchwell Nov 9 '12 at 8:50
    
Thank you, but I would like the output of itemsArray to match the sortingArray. – user1448892 Nov 9 '12 at 8:51

I would use an intermediary object (itemsMap), thus avoiding quadratic complexity:

function createItemsMap(itemsArray) { // {"a": ["Anne"], "b": ["Bob", "Henry"], …}
  var itemsMap = {};
  for (var i = 0, item; (item = itemsArray[i]); ++i) {
    (itemsMap[item[1]] || (itemsMap[item[1]] = [])).push(item[0]);
  }
  return itemsMap;
}

function sortByKeys(itemsArray, sortingArr) {
  var itemsMap = createItemsMap(itemsArray), result = [];
  for (var i = 0; i < sortingArr.length; ++i) {
    var key = sortingArr[i];
    result.push([itemsMap[key].shift(), key]);
  }
  return result;
}

See http://jsfiddle.net/eUskE/

share|improve this answer

You can do something like this:

function getSorted(itemsArray , sortingArr ) {
  var result = [];
  for(var i=0; i<arr.length; i++) {
    result[i] = arr[sortArr[i]];
  }
  return result;
}

You can test it out here.

Note: this assumes the arrays you pass in are equivalent in size, you'd need to add some additional checks if this may not be the case.

refer link

refer

share|improve this answer

Use the $.inArray() method from jQuery. You then could do something like this

var sortingArr = [ 'b', 'c', 'b', 'b', 'c', 'd' ];
var newSortedArray = new Array();

for(var i=sortingArr.length; i--;) {
 var foundIn = $.inArray(sortingArr[i], itemsArray);
 newSortedArray.push(itemsArray[foundIn]);
}
share|improve this answer

this should works:

var i,search, itemsArraySorted = [];
while(sortingArr.length) {
    search = sortingArr.shift();
    for(i = 0; i<itemsArray.length; i++) {
        if(itemsArray[i][1] == search) {
            itemsArraySorted.push(itemsArray[i]);
            break;
        }
    } 
}

itemsArray = itemsArraySorted;
share|improve this answer
var sortedArray = [];
for(var i=0; i < sortingArr.length; i++) {
    var found = false;
    for(var j=0; j < itemsArray.length && !found; j++) {
        if(itemsArray[j][1] == sortingArr[i]) {
            sortedArray.push(itemsArray[j]);
            itemsArray.splice(j,1);
            found = true;
        }
    }
}

http://jsfiddle.net/s7b2P/

Resulting order: Bob,Jason,Henry,Thomas,Anne,Andrew

share|improve this answer

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