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I have the following structure of classes and a templated wrapper class.

class A {};
class B : public A {};

template<class T>
class Foo {
  T val;
public:
  Foo(T t) {val = t};
  T get() {return val};
}

Now, I need a function to process the values stored in the template but I can not modify the template itself. What I want is a function with signature similar to

void process(Foo<A>*) {/* do something */}

and I want to use it like

B b; Foo<B> foo(b);
process(&foo);

However, this won't work because the compiler does not know how to convert Foo<B>* to Foo<A>*. Is there any workarround to fix the process function?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Make process a function template:

template <typename T> void process(Foo<T>*)

Inside the function template you can use the typename T as if it was class A. The function template will then work for all calls with Foo<B> as well.

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Making process a template function is what I wanted to avoid. However, I seems to be the most reasonable solution to my problem. Thanks. –  cjbrehmer Nov 9 '12 at 12:32

While B is a-kind-of A, Foo<B> is not a-kind-of Foo<A>.

An apple is a fruit. Is a bag of apple also a bag of fruit? No, because you could put a pear in a bag of fruit.

In your case you cannot put anything in your wrapper after its creation, so this argument doesn't work. But the C++ compiler is not smart enough to figure this out. In other languages like Scala you can actually make this work.

You can make process a template, except sometimes you cannot because e.g. it's a virtual function in some class.

With some easy-to-moderate manual work and template metaprogramming one could actually make Foo<Derived> work like Foo<Base>. The manual work would involve splitting Foo into interface and implementation parts.

// Instead of class B : public A, use class B : public DiscoverableBase<A>
// Doesn't cost you anything. Won't work with multiple inheritance, where 
// scattered-inheritance or similar technique must be adopted.

#include <cstdlib> 
template <typename B>
struct DiscoverableBase : public B
{
    typedef B Base;
};

struct Void {};

// This fetches Base member type out of T, or Void if there's none.
// Probably could be simplified a bit.
template <typename T>
class BaseOf
{
    typedef char yes;
    typedef struct { char a[2]; } no;

    template <typename Q, size_t> struct GetBase;

    template <typename Q>
    struct GetBase<Q, sizeof(no)>
    {
        typedef Void Base;
    };

    template <typename Q>
    struct GetBase<Q, sizeof(yes)>
    {
        typedef typename T::Base Base;
    };

    template <typename C> static yes check(typename C::Base*) ;
    template <typename C> static no  check(...);
  public:
    typedef typename GetBase<T, sizeof(check<T>(0))>::Base Base;
};

// This is how you use DiscoverableBase.
class A {};
class B : public DiscoverableBase<A> {};

// Foo is a bit more complicated now. 
template<typename T> class Foo;

// The base case, inherited by Foo<X> where X has no discoverable base
template<> class Foo<Void> {};

// This is the Foo interface. Note how it retuns a reference to T now.
template<typename T>
class Foo : public Foo<typename BaseOf<T>::Base>
{
  public:
    virtual T& get() = 0;
};

// This is the Foo implementation.
template<typename T>
class FooImpl : public Foo<T>
{
    T val;
  public:
    FooImpl(T t) {val = t;}
    T& get() {return val;}
};

// the rest is mostly unchanged
void process(Foo<A>*) {/* do something */}

int main()
{
    B b; FooImpl<B> foo(b);
    process(&foo);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much for your solution. This application of template metaprogramming is very insightful. Unfortunately, the proposed solution would require massive changes to our code. Thus, I will resort to making process a template. –  cjbrehmer Nov 9 '12 at 12:37

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