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I need (and can't find) a pure python (no c++) implementation of MurmurHash, and I'm too novice to write myself. Speed or memory usage doesn't matter on my project.

I find a attempt here, but it's limited to 31bits hash and I really need a 64bits hash.

Note : for those who need a fast implementation, there is a MurmurHash2 library here and a MurmurHash3 library here

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Why do you want a pure Python implementation? –  user647772 Nov 9 '12 at 9:42
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I need a pure Python implementation because my application needs to run on platforms that can't execute non-python code (like Google App Engine). –  greg Nov 9 '12 at 9:51
    
There is also this one, but I think the mmh3 one you found looks better cared for. code.google.com/p/pyfasthash –  Paul Bissex Dec 7 '13 at 2:43
    
C/C++, not pure python... ("It provide several common hash algorithms with C/C++ implementation for performance") –  greg Jan 14 at 10:22
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2 Answers

this is untested (sorry!), but here is a version I came up with. Python allows for arbitrarily large integers, so I created a mask for the first 8 bytes (or 64 bits) that I then apply (via bitwise AND) to all arithmetic results that could produce integers larger than 64bits. Maybe somebody else could comment on the general approach and possible issues with endianness, etc.

def bytes_to_long(bytes):
    assert len(bytes) == 8
    return sum((b << (k * 8) for k, b in enumerate(bytes)))


def murmur(data, seed):

    m = 0xc6a4a7935bd1e995
    r = 47

    MASK = 2 ** 64 - 1

    data_as_bytes = bytearray(data)

    h = seed ^ ((m * len(data_as_bytes)) & MASK)

    for ll in range(0, len(data_as_bytes), 8):
        k = bytes_to_long(data_as_bytes[ll:ll + 8])
        k = (k * m) & MASK
        k = k ^ ((k >> r) & MASK)
        k = (k * m) & MASK
        h = (h ^ k)
        h = (h * m) & MASK

    l = len(data_as_bytes) & 7

    if l >= 7:
        h = (h ^ (data_as_bytes[6] << 48))

    if l >= 6:
        h = (h ^ (data_as_bytes[5] << 40))

    if l >= 5:
        h = (h ^ (data_as_bytes[4] << 32))

    if l >= 4:
        h = (h ^ (data_as_bytes[3] << 24))

    if l >= 3:
        h = (h ^ (data_as_bytes[4] << 16))

    if l >= 2:
        h = (h ^ (data_as_bytes[4] << 8))

    if l >= 1:
        h = (h ^ data_as_bytes[4])
        h = (h * m) & MASK

    h = h ^ ((h >> r) & MASK)
    h = (h * m) & MASK
    h = h ^ ((h >> r) & MASK)

    return h
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Here goes a pure Python implementation of MurmurHash3 32, it hashes strings only but can be easily adapted to take byte arrays instead. This is a port from the Java version of the algorithm.

def murmur3_x86_32(data, seed = 0):
    c1 = 0xcc9e2d51
    c2 = 0x1b873593

    length = len(data)
    h1 = seed
    roundedEnd = (length & 0xfffffffc)  # round down to 4 byte block
    for i in range(0, roundedEnd, 4):
      # little endian load order
      k1 = (ord(data[i]) & 0xff) | ((ord(data[i + 1]) & 0xff) << 8) | \
           ((ord(data[i + 2]) & 0xff) << 16) | (ord(data[i + 3]) << 24)
      k1 *= c1
      k1 = (k1 << 15) | ((k1 & 0xffffffff) >> 17) # ROTL32(k1,15)
      k1 *= c2

      h1 ^= k1
      h1 = (h1 << 13) | ((h1 & 0xffffffff) >> 19)  # ROTL32(h1,13)
      h1 = h1 * 5 + 0xe6546b64

    # tail
    k1 = 0

    val = length & 0x03
    if val == 3:
        k1 = (ord(data[roundedEnd + 2]) & 0xff) << 16
    # fallthrough
    if val in [2, 3]:
        k1 |= (ord(data[roundedEnd + 1]) & 0xff) << 8
    # fallthrough
    if val in [1, 2, 3]:
        k1 |= ord(data[roundedEnd]) & 0xff
        k1 *= c1
        k1 = (k1 << 15) | ((k1 & 0xffffffff) >> 17)  # ROTL32(k1,15)
        k1 *= c2
        h1 ^= k1

    # finalization
    h1 ^= length

    # fmix(h1)
    h1 ^= ((h1 & 0xffffffff) >> 16)
    h1 *= 0x85ebca6b
    h1 ^= ((h1 & 0xffffffff) >> 13)
    h1 *= 0xc2b2ae35
    h1 ^= ((h1 & 0xffffffff) >> 16)

    return h1 & 0xffffffff
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