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Let's say original documentation for a class looks like this:

/**
 * My custom class
 *
 * This class helps you do stuff.  It's really great.
 *
 * @author  David Smith
 * @version 1.0
 */
  1. If I come along and rework 50% of the code, how do I document that I made significant contributions?

  2. What is the best way to add a date? e.g. When the code was last modified, when I made my updates, or when the version was updated.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I'm aware I'm not really answering your question, but I wonder why you're using @author at all.

For tracking changes to code (who created a file? who changed it?), use your version control system. That's what it's for, after all :)

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I agree, but some nasty evil bad places don't use (real) source control... I've had to work at places like that... It's just wrong. –  Idiot211 Nov 9 '12 at 11:00
    
@Fusselwurm Valid point, but what about if the class gets distributed outside of version control? –  BadHorsie Nov 16 '12 at 17:54
    
+1. My team uses the author field to indicate a person who understands the method well - more of a custodian than necessarily being the person who originally wrote the code. So if you hit the code and want to ask questions about it, they're "a good place to start". For more detail of who changed what when why, the checkin history is perfect - why pollute the code with that information. –  Jason Williams Mar 1 '13 at 23:15

One way I've seen in the companies I've worked for over the years is to do this

 /**
 * My custom class
 *
 * This class helps you do stuff.  It's really great.
 *
 * @author  David Smith
 * @version 1.0
 *
 * @modifier Rahul Parkar
 * @modifiedDate 09/11/2012
 */

Also, I've seen them use 2 methods to document changes, one is to use something like Git where each commit has a commit message, the other is to use another Doc tag to document changes.

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