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We have a client application coded in C++ that connects to a Java application server via SSL using openssl. We use non-blocking socket connection mode with option to choose 'select' or 'poll' mechanism for identifying the data packets available to be read.

the client has been working fine for quite a while, but recently we noticed an issue where the response is getting split into multiple packets and SSL_read is returning just one character 'H' with SSL_ERROR_NONE and SSL_pending zero, as a result of which our SSL_read loop is ending with incomplete response. On a subsequent reinvocation of SSL_read [as a hack] we get the remaining response starting with 'TTP 1.1'.

Since SSL_pending=0 and SSL_get_error()=SSL_ERROR_NONE, we do not find any other way to know if there is more data to be read and hence ending the 'SSL_read' loop which just reads one character.

Here is the relevant pseudo code... 

bool done=false;
int pending=1; bool inited=false;
bool want_read=false; bool want_write=false;
timeval tv;
String response; //internal class for string, legacy            
while(!done) {
if( !inited || want_read || want_write ) {
    try {
        /* Wait a few seconds. */
        if(!inited) {
            tv.tv_sec = timeOutValue.tv_sec;
            tv.tv_usec = timeOutValue.tv_usec;
        } else {
            tv.tv_sec = 0;
            tv.tv_usec = 500000; //hack to reduce the waiting period
        } 
                    #ifdef USE_POLL
            poll the socket
        #else
            call 'select' on the socket
        #endif
        inited=true;
        continue;
    } catch(const XSeption&) {
        close_socket(&sock);
        done=true;
        cout << "Error waiting on select/poll call" << endl;
        break;
    }
}

memset(temp, 0, BUFSIZE);
charsRead = SSL_read(ssl,temp, (sizeof(char)*BUFSIZE));
cout << endl << "charsRead = " << charsRead << endl;    

if(charsRead>0) {
    response.append(temp, charsRead);
}
cout << "Response : " << response << endl;

int sslerror = SSL_get_error(ssl,charsRead);
cout << "SSL_error_code = " << sslerror << endl;

pending=SSL_pending(ssl);
cout << "pending characters in the current SSL buffer : " << endl;

/*
if(charsRead==1) {
    memset(temp, 0, BUFSIZE);
    cout << "read only one character which is odd,hence reading again" << endl;
    charsRead = SSL_read(ssl,temp, (sizeof(char)*BUFSIZE));
    cout << endl << "charsRead in second read = " << charsRead << endl;
    if(charsRead>0) {
        response.append(temp, charsRead);
    }
    cout << "Second Response : " << response << endl;

    sslerror = SSL_get_error(ssl,charsRead);
    cout << "SSL_error_code = " << sslerror << endl;

    pending=SSL_pending(ssl);
    cout << "pending characters in the current SSL buffer : " << endl;
}
*/

switch(sslerror){

    case SSL_ERROR_NONE:
        cout << "No SSL Error" << endl;
        done=true; //ideally, we should mark the process completed here; but if mark this completed here, then we are getting only 1 character 'H'
        break;
    case SSL_ERROR_WANT_READ:
        cout << "In SSL_ERROR_WANT_READ" << endl;
        //SSLread Still pending
        want_read=true;
        //continue;
        break;

    case SSL_ERROR_WANT_WRITE:
        cout << "In SSL_ERROR_WANT_WRITE" << endl;
        //SSLread Still pending
        want_write=true;
        //continue;
        break;

    case SSL_ERROR_SSL:
        done=true;
        cout << "encountered SSL INTERNAL ERROR" << endl;
        close_socket(&sock);
        break;

    case SSL_ERROR_SYSCALL:
        done=true;
        cout << "encountered ERROR SYSCALL" << endl;
        close_socket(&sock);
        break;

    case SSL_ERROR_ZERO_RETURN:
        done=true;
        cout << "encountered SSL ZERO RETURN" << endl;
        close_socket(&sock);
        break;

    default:
        done=true;
        cout << "encountered default error" << endl;
        close_socket(&sock);
        break;
    } //end of switch  
} //end of while  

cout << "Final Response : " << response << endl;  

So, how can I identify that the response is complete or is pending when SSL_pending returns zero and the SSL_get_error is SSL_ERROR_NONE and i do not know how long [number of bytes/characters the response can be?

Are my expectations wrong? Why is the SSL_read returning a single character the first time even though we provide a larger buffer?

Any help in this regard is highly appreciated...

UPDATE:

while(!done) {
currentTime = getTime();
tval.tv_sec = timeOutValue.tv_sec - (currentTime - beginTime);
tval.tv_usec = timeOutValue.tv_usec;
if ( tval.tv_sec <= 0 ) //the allotted time for processing this request has elapsed
{
    //do not close the socket or SSL session since this is just a timeout issue
    throw Exception::TIMEOUT);
}

#ifdef USE_POLL
    fds.fd = sock;
    fds.events = POLLIN;
#else
    FD_ZERO(&rset);
    FD_SET(sock, &rset);
#endif

if(!inited || want_read || want_write) {
    timeval tv;
    /*
    When we first enter this method or for NON-SSL requests, we would wait till the SELECT call returns a ready file-descriptor but in the case of a SSL requests processing the response message , we just issue SELECT with 0(zero) or very little timeout since SSL_read is giving us a common error code for actual need to check at the socket (SELECT/POLL) and the need to call SSL_read again, if we can find a way to differentiate the need to call SELECT/POLL Vs invoke SSL_read, then this if-else construct needs to be removed and we can then use the complete remaining time for timeout parameter in SELECT/POLL call even for SSL requests
    */
    if(!inited ) {
        tv.tv_sec=tval.tv_sec;
        tv.tv_usec=tval.tv_usec;
    } else {
        tv.tv_sec=0;
        tv.tv_usec=1000;
    }
    try {
        #ifdef USE_POLL
            poll_call(&fds, 1, &tv);
        #else
            select_call(sock+1, &rset, NULL, NULL, &tv);
        #endif
    } catch(const Exception&) {
        /*
        do not close the socket or throw exception; the socket will be closed only if an error occurs or if the server itself the closed the connection
        */
    }
    inited=true;
    want_read=false;
    want_write=false;
}

memset(temp, 0, BUFSIZE);

charsRead = openSSL->SSLread(temp, (sizeof(char)*BUFSIZE));
if(charsRead>0) {
    response.append(temp, charsRead);
    done=is_response_complete(response);
} else {
    int sslerror=openSSL->SSLgetErrorCode(charsRead);
    switch(sslerror){

        case SSL_ERROR_NONE:
            break;

        case SSL_ERROR_WANT_READ:
            want_read=true;
            break;

        case SSL_ERROR_WANT_WRITE:
            want_write=true;
            break;

        case SSL_ERROR_SSL:
            close(openSSL, Exception::SSL_CONNECTION_PROBLEM, 
                    ErrorDescription(sslerror));
            break;

        case SSL_ERROR_SYSCALL:
            close(openSSL,Exception::SERVER_CONNECTION_PROBLEM,
                    ErrorDescription(sslerror));
            break;

        case SSL_ERROR_ZERO_RETURN:
        default:
            close(openSSL,Exception::SSL_CONNECTION_PROBLEM,
                        ErrorDescription(sslerror));
            break;
    } //end of switch
} //end off ssl_error check
}
share|improve this question
    
Is the BIO blocking or non-blocking? –  alk Nov 9 '12 at 12:01
    
it is in non-blocking mode –  Saasira Nov 12 '12 at 9:27

3 Answers 3

With OpenSSL, the normal process is inverted;

  • with normal sockets, you select() until it says the sockets are readable or writable.

  • With SSL sockets, you read and write until they return SSL_ERROR_WANT_READ/WRITE. Only then do you call select().

"Since SSL_pending=0 and SSL_get_error()=SSL_ERROR_NONE, we do not find any other way to know if there is more data to be read"

So you should assume there is always more data to be read until you get SSL_ERROR_WANT_READ. Instead of telling you there is more data to be read, OpenSSL uses WANT_READ/WANT_WRITE to tell you there is no more data to be read.

I am seeing the same behaviour in my app; When I do an SSL_read, I get 1 byte:

G

As I did not get a WANT_READ/WRITE, I do SSL_read again and I get the rest of the data

ET /index.html HTTP/1.1
Host: etc etc

I continue to do this until I get WANT_READ/WRITE, and then I wait on select() because OpenSSL said to do so.

share|improve this answer
    
First, sorry for delayed response; this is a festive week for us in India. I sensed that we need to call select() only when we get WANT_READ or WANT_WRITE error, and continue to call SSL_read() until we get the complete response. So I changed my code accordingly but am seeing a slightly different behaviour. –  Saasira Jan 17 '13 at 8:38
    
On some client systems, calling SSL_read() twice would give us complete response, but on some client systems it required 3-12 iterations of select()+SSL_read() to get the response. Actually, select() call waited forever until timeout, so i started invoking select() without any delay (zero timeout) when we get WANT_READ or WANT_WRITE error. Is it okay to call select() with zero timeout if we get WANT_READ or WANT_WRITE error? if calling select(timeout=0)+SSL_read() is giving me response in at most 12 rounds in less than a second, why a single call to select(timeout=30) is waiting till timeout? –  Saasira Jan 17 '13 at 9:13
    
If you get a WANT_WRITE error on ssl_read, are you selecting for writability? Also are you doing any other ssl operations? When ssl makes progress (an ssl_write which returned WANT_READ can also make progress), you need to retry all operations on all ports. –  A G Jan 17 '13 at 10:37
    
I did not get WANT_WRITE so far, but i read that it may happen during renegotiation and that we need to invoke SSL_read() (or actually same function as previous) again in such case. Now that things are working with the update code, I have two questions: a) is it valid to call select() with zero timeout when i get WANT_READ error, like the way i did in the update code? b) why is the select call waiting forever if i provide timeout but calling select() a few times with zero timeout gets me the complete response in just a few milliseconds? –  Saasira Jan 17 '13 at 15:21
1  
hhmm, how many ports are you dealing with? a) yes i guess its valid, but the whole point of select is to block. b) Select is reporting on the network buffer; it will return when there is something to read off the socket. When you do an ssl_read, it will read from the ssl buffer. So its possible there is data in the ssl buffer, but none in the network buffer. That is why select with 0 timeout, you are calling ssl_read and getting unread data from the ssl buffer. If you call select, you will wait forever, as there is no new data coming in on the network; its already read into the ssl buffers. –  A G Jan 17 '13 at 15:41

I have see this behavior as well. The proper way to handle it is your application should expect any amount of data at any time... it's a "stream" of data, not packetized request/responses. The only way to identify a "complete request/response" is to parse it at the application level. If you don't have a complete one, buffer it and wait for more data. The transport mechanism can't and doesn't tell you that... it's just saying "hey I have data".

share|improve this answer

As you do read via a non-blocking BIO, it is not guaranteed that you'll receive all data expected+ with only one call to SSL_read().

So it might be necessary to call SSL_read() again several times up until all data you are expecting+ had been read, or the connection had been closed, or an error occurred.

To do so you could place the call to SSL_read() inside the while-loop doing the select().


(+) How much data actually is expected to be transfered is unknown by the transport layer. This either shall be known to both (sender and receiver) or negotiating needs be part of the application level protocol.

share|improve this answer
    
I understood that processing the response is the only foolproof way to decide if the client received the complete response; and i changed code accordingly. But, the documentation says "When using a non-blocking socket, nothing is to be done, but select() can be used to check for the required condition." It is not clear whether select() can be called always or under which conditions. If select()is called in every iteration then it will add up some delay unless we call select with zero timeval. Is calling select without wait/delay acceptable in this case or should it be called on some condition? –  Saasira Jan 9 '13 at 12:21
    
i'm having an issue where the response seems to have been read by openssl into to its buffers but not able to return on calling SSL_read; first it gave 'H', then when SSL_read is called again 'TTP*' on some client machines; but on some other client machines, I am getting SSL_ERROR_WANT_READ on calling SSL_read for a few times and the response is not returned completely until a few (3-12) repeated calls. Now my doubt is when should i just call SSL_read or when should I call select()+SSL_read(). Is openssl using the same error code for two different states -- SOCKET read and also SSL_read ? –  Saasira Jan 9 '13 at 13:55

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