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In MS SQL 2000 and 2005, given a datetime such as '2008-09-25 12:34:56' what is the most efficient way to get a datetime containing only '2008-09-25'?

Duplicated here.

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I'm very gratified that the first three answers are all different, it means it is not a stupid question! :) –  Matt Howells Sep 25 '08 at 12:48
    

10 Answers 10

up vote 89 down vote accepted

I must admit I hadn't seen the floor-float conversion shown by Matt before. I had to test this out.

I tested a pure select (which will return Date and Time, and is not what we want), the reigning solution here (floor-float), a common 'naive' one mentioned here (stringconvert) and the one mentioned here that I was using (as I thought it was the fastest).

I tested the queries on a test-server MS SQL Server 2005 running on a Win 2003 SP2 Server with a Xeon 3GHz CPU running on max memory (32 bit, so that's about 3.5 Gb). It's night where I am so the machine is idling along at almost no load. I've got it all to myself.

Here's the log from my test-run selecting from a large table containing timestamps varying down to the millisecond level. This particular dataset includes dates ranging over 2.5 years. The table itself has over 130 million rows, so that's why I restrict to the top million.

SELECT TOP 1000000 CRETS FROM tblMeasureLogv2 
SELECT TOP 1000000 CAST(FLOOR(CAST(CRETS AS FLOAT)) AS DATETIME) FROM tblMeasureLogv2
SELECT TOP 1000000 CONVERT(DATETIME, CONVERT(VARCHAR(10), CRETS, 120) , 120) FROM tblMeasureLogv2 
SELECT TOP 1000000 DATEADD(DAY, DATEDIFF(DAY, 0, CRETS), 0) FROM tblMeasureLogv2

SQL Server parse and compile time: CPU time = 0 ms, elapsed time = 1 ms.

(1000000 row(s) affected) Table 'tblMeasureLogv2'. Scan count 1, logical reads 4752, physical reads 0, read-ahead reads 0, lob logical reads 0, lob physical reads 0, lob read-ahead reads 0.

SQL Server Execution Times: CPU time = 422 ms, elapsed time = 33803 ms.

(1000000 row(s) affected) Table 'tblMeasureLogv2'. Scan count 1, logical reads 4752, physical reads 0, read-ahead reads 0, lob logical reads 0, lob physical reads 0, lob read-ahead reads 0.

SQL Server Execution Times: CPU time = 625 ms, elapsed time = 33545 ms.

(1000000 row(s) affected) Table 'tblMeasureLogv2'. Scan count 1, logical reads 4752, physical reads 0, read-ahead reads 0, lob logical reads 0, lob physical reads 0, lob read-ahead reads 0.

SQL Server Execution Times: CPU time = 1953 ms, elapsed time = 33843 ms.

(1000000 row(s) affected) Table 'tblMeasureLogv2'. Scan count 1, logical reads 4752, physical reads 0, read-ahead reads 0, lob logical reads 0, lob physical reads 0, lob read-ahead reads 0.

SQL Server Execution Times: CPU time = 531 ms, elapsed time = 33440 ms. SQL Server parse and compile time: CPU time = 0 ms, elapsed time = 1 ms.

SQL Server Execution Times: CPU time = 0 ms, elapsed time = 1 ms.

What are we seeing here?

Let's focus on the CPU time (we're looking at conversion), and we can see that we have the following numbers:

Pure-Select:  422
Floor-cast:   625
String-conv: 1953
DateAdd:      531

From this it looks to me like the DateAdd (at least in this particular case) is slightly faster than the floor-cast method.

Before you go there, I ran this test several times, with the order of the queries changed, same-ish results.

Is this something strange on my server, or what?

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It's not strange at all. First, in my opinion converting to float is poor practice, because a round-trip conversion to datetime is not reliable. Second, please see this post with more performance testing of the various methods. –  ErikE Sep 13 '10 at 0:06
Select DateAdd(Day, DateDiff(Day, 0, GetDate()), 0)

DateDiff(Day, 0, GetDate()) is the same as DateDiff(Day, '1900-01-01', GetDate())

Since DateDiff returns an integer, you will get the number of days that have elapsed since Jan 1, 1900. You then add that integer number of days to Jan 1, 1900. The net effect is removing the time component.

I should also mention that this method works for any date/time part (like year, quarter, month, day, hour, minute, and second).

Select  DateAdd(Year, DateDiff(Year, 0, GetDate()), 0)
Select  DateAdd(Quarter, DateDiff(Quarter, 0, GetDate()), 0)
Select  DateAdd(Month, DateDiff(Month, 0, GetDate()), 0)
Select  DateAdd(Day, DateDiff(Day, 0, GetDate()), 0)
Select  DateAdd(Hour, DateDiff(Hour, 0, GetDate()), 0)
Select  DateAdd(Second, DateDiff(Second, '20000101', GetDate()), '20000101')

The last one, for seconds, requires special handling. If you use Jan 1, 1900 you will get an error.

Difference of two datetime columns caused overflow at runtime.

You can circumvent this error by using a different reference date (like Jan 1, 2000).

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Are you sure this is the most efficient method? –  Matt Howells Sep 25 '08 at 13:02
    
My tests show that Matt's method is slightly faster. I also find it more readable. –  Darrel Miller Sep 25 '08 at 13:32
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@Dar In my opinion converting to float is poor practice, because a round-trip conversion to datetime is not reliable. Please see this post for more detail. –  ErikE Sep 13 '10 at 0:08
select cast(floor(cast(@datetime as float)) as datetime)

Works because casting a datetime to float gives the number of days (including fractions of a day) since Jan 1, 1900. Flooring it removes the fractional days and leaves the number of whole days, which can then be cast back to a datetime.

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I have been using the same method and it has been working great. As far as I remember the DATETIME is actually physically stored as a FLOAT so that method is very efficient. Also I recall reading somewhere that it was used internally by Microsoft. Not sure if that is still the case with SS2008 –  kristof Sep 25 '08 at 13:48
3  
SQL2008 has much-improved (and much-needed) date handling functions. It would be as simple as casting the datetime to the new date type. –  Matt Howells Sep 25 '08 at 15:37
3  
@kristof datetime is not physically stored as a float. It is two 4-byte integers, with the first the number of days since 1900-1-1 and the second the number of 1/300th second ticks since midnight. Last, in my opinion converting to float is poor practice, because a round-trip conversion to datetime is not reliable. Please see this post for more detail. –  ErikE Sep 13 '10 at 0:07

To get YYYY-MM-DD, use:

select convert(varchar(10), getdate(), 120)

Edit: Oops, he wants a DateTime instead of a string. The equivalent of TRUNC() in Oracle. You can take what I posted and cast back to a DateTime:

select convert(datetime, convert(varchar(10), getdate(), 120) , 120)
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Please note that converting to varchar is slower. See this post for more detail. –  ErikE Sep 13 '10 at 0:09

CONVERT, FLOOR ,and DATEDIFF will perform just the same.

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/113045/how-to-return-the-date-part-only-from-a-sql-server-datetime-datatype#113733

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This is not true. See the linked thread for an update or just jump to this post for more detail. –  ErikE Sep 13 '10 at 0:09

Three methods described in the link below. I haven't performance tested them to determine which is quickest.

http://www.blackwasp.co.uk/SQLDateFromDateTime.aspx

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CAST(FLOOR(CAST(yourdate AS DECIMAL(12, 5))) AS DATETIME) performs the best by far. you can see the proof & tests when getting the date without time in sql server

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Why not test the dateadd/datediff too? –  gbn Dec 13 '10 at 6:35

What About SELECT CAST(CASt(GETDATE() AS int) AS DATETIME)??

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Because that is not what OP asked for..? –  mbinette Nov 5 '12 at 1:38
select cast(getdate()as varchar(11))as datetime
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Please note that converting to varchar is slower. See this post for more detail. –  ErikE Sep 13 '10 at 0:10

CONVERT(VARCHAR(10), GETDATE(), 120) AS [YYYY-MM-DD]

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Please note that converting to varchar is slower. See this post for more detail. –  ErikE Sep 13 '10 at 0:09

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