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Say I have the string "Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Phasellus arcu massa, tempus non tincidunt ut, tempus sit amet odio. Mauris in dui sed enim vulputate dictum."

I want that string wrapped by a specific length (in pixels) and without breaking words. 80 pixels for example.

I have the Font variable that is used to draw the string and the Graphics variable (often called "g") so I can measure the length of the string where needed.

All samples that I found only wrap text by character-length but I need it in pixels for GDI+ drawing. I do not want to use the TextRenderer control because it seems to bug. Sometimes it measures it's own text-height wrong. It's rare but it happens.

So far I got the following:

public static string WrapTextByPixels(string text, ref Graphics g, Font font, float maxWidth)
        {
            string[] originalLines = text.Split(new[] { " " }, StringSplitOptions.None);

            var wrapBuilder = new StringBuilder();

            float currentLineWidth = 0;

            foreach (var item in originalLines)
            {
                float itemWidth = g.MeasureString(item, font).Width;

                currentLineWidth += itemWidth;
                if (currentLineWidth > maxWidth ||
                    itemWidth > maxWidth) // When a single word is longer than the maxWidth then just add it
                {
                    wrapBuilder.Append(Environment.NewLine);
                    currentLineWidth = 0;
                }
                wrapBuilder.Append(item + " ");
            }

            return wrapBuilder.ToString();
        }

But the above code doesn't work. Some lines are still too long.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You cannot bypass TextRenderer here, you must use its MeasureText() method so the calculated layout matches what is rendered, later, when the DrawText() method renders the text. Other ways to calculate string length, like Graphics.MeasureString() will just produce more error, the text layout for the Graphics class is very different. And pretty broken, the reason that TextRenderer was added in .NET 2.0

If you get bad results then that's almost always because you didn't specify the TextFormatFlags correctly. It must exactly match the flags that will be used in the DrawText() method call. That's not always easy to find out, especially when the text is drawn by painting code inside the framework. Use the Reference Source to find out.

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So if I understand this right, there is no way to do it 100% properly? The Graphics.MeasureText() seems to bug too. But the TextRenderer.MeasureString() also bugs. I don't see how I can use the wrong TextFormatFlags. I use g.DrawString() that just specified a PointF to start the drawing. –  Napoleon Nov 9 '12 at 13:54
    
TextRender.MeasureText() is used heavily in the .NET Framework code. Which does it 100% properly for things like AutoSize. It is hard to help you, your are asking an XY question. X cannot work and we don't know what Y looks like. –  Hans Passant Nov 9 '12 at 14:03
    
You're right. I indeed did make a mistake regarding the TextFormatFlags somewhere. After fixing it, it seems to work. I tested it with 200+ texts and they were all correctly measured. Thank you. Still it's a bit sad that the Graphics.MeasureString() doesn't always work but this will do for me. –  Napoleon Nov 9 '12 at 14:15
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This is an extension method I once found, it's not my own and I'd like to give credit, but I don't remember where I got it from:

public static string WrapText(this string text, double pixels, string fontFamily, float emSize)
    {
        string[] originalLines = text.Split(new[] { " " }, StringSplitOptions.None);

        var wrapBuilder = new StringBuilder();

        double actualWidth = 0;

        foreach (var item in originalLines)
        {
            var formatted = new FormattedText(
                item,
                CultureInfo.CurrentCulture,
                FlowDirection.LeftToRight,
                new Typeface(fontFamily),
                emSize,
                Brushes.Black);

            actualWidth += formatted.Width;
            if (actualWidth > pixels)
            {
                wrapBuilder.Append(Environment.NewLine);
                actualWidth = 0;
            }
            wrapBuilder.Append(item + " ");
        }

        return wrapBuilder.ToString();
    }

This should help you on your way.

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FormattedText is not supported in regular projects. It will throw the exception: "System.Windows.Freezable' is defined in an assembly that is not referenced" –  Napoleon Nov 9 '12 at 13:26
    
Okay, this is because System.Windows.Media resides in a WPF namespace, I don't know if there's a similar thing for GDI. The point of FormattedText is that it helps you calculate the projected width in pixels of your text. Look for a similar functionality. –  Davio Nov 9 '12 at 13:40
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I'm not entirely convinced that the GDI+ text formatter is broken, but there are circumstances under which it just won't do what you need and you need to word wrap for yourself.

The "simple" approach is to scan your string looking for locations where you are happy to insert line breaks (such as at spaces - but you may also like to consider punctuation like commas and dashes as potiential locations).

As you build up a new string word by word, use Graphics.MeasureString to determine the new width of the line. When that exceeds the desired width, you need to insert a newline before the current word.

Note that you will have problems with text that can't be broken in the available width (a very long word without spaces in it, or a very narrow formatting width) so you may need a fallback mechanism that breaks within words under these circumstances (either stop at the last character that fits, or go mad and add a hyphenation system).

Also note that the StringFormat you use can cause problems when working with text fragments like this because it can be set to include/exclude whitespace at the start/end of the text you are measuring, so this can screw up the width calculation such that it causes you to word-wrap a bit too early or a bit too late when the last character "grazes" the edge of the formatting area. In a similar way you have to be careful about whitespace at the end of the line, and multiple whitespace character sequences.

For debugging, a good approach is to base the formatting width on the width of a window, and then reformat the text for every repaint. Then you can gradually drag the widow out and back to check that the formatter is word wrapping at the ideal width, and copes with narrow formatting regions etc.

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