Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have been looking everywhere to figure out what these mean and how they are used +=, -=, *=, /=, the most I have found is that they are, "Assignment by Addition", "Assignment by Difference", "Assignment by Product", "Assignment by Quotient", etc, but I can't figure out when or how they are used. If anyone can please explain this to me I would be very grateful. thanks

share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by Neal, Conrad Frix, Jan Hančič, VMAtm, Lafada Dec 11 '12 at 6:56

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
others you will see: a++ means a = a + 1, a-- means a = a - 1 –  codingbiz Nov 9 '12 at 12:57
    
A google search for c# Assignment by Addition will lead you to the MSDN page describing what it does. –  comecme Nov 9 '12 at 13:04
    
Consider just using them in a simple application and observing what the result(s) are. –  Servy Nov 9 '12 at 18:42
add comment

7 Answers

up vote 12 down vote accepted

They are shorthand:

a += b

is the same as

a = a + b

Etc...

so

  • a -= b is equivalent to a = a - b
  • a *= b is equivalent to a = a * b
  • a /= b is equivalent to a = a / b

As Kevin Brydon suggested - Familiarize yourself with the operators in C# here.

share|improve this answer
    
good to know thank :) –  Ian Lundberg Nov 9 '12 at 12:52
1  
@IanLundberg It would be worth your while to spend 15 minutes familiarizing yourself with the operators in C# msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/6a71f45d%28v=vs.110%29.aspx. It will benefit you in the long run. –  Kevin Brydon Nov 9 '12 at 12:57
add comment

See 7.13 Assignment operators in the spec and its subsections., specifically 7.13.2 Compound assignment:

An operation of the form x op= y is processed by applying binary operator overload resolution (Section 7.2.4) as if the operation was written x op y. Then,

•If the return type of the selected operator is implicitly convertible to the type of x, the operation is evaluated as x = x op y, except that x is evaluated only once.

•Otherwise, if the selected operator is a predefined operator, if the return type of the selected operator is explicitly convertible to the type of x, and if y is implicitly convertible to the type of x, then the operation is evaluated as x = (T)(x op y), where T is the type of x, except that x is evaluated only once.

•Otherwise, the compound assignment is invalid, and a compile-time error occurs.

share|improve this answer
add comment
a+=1 means a = a+1
a-=2 means a = a-2
a*=3 means a = a*3
a/=4 means a = a/4
share|improve this answer
add comment

Roughly, var *operator*= expression means var = var *operator* expression. Also, I've heard there's a documentation somewhere.

share|improve this answer
add comment

These are Assignment operators(Shorthands)

a += 1; is equal to a =  a + 1;

b -= 1; is equal to b =  b - 1;

a *= 1; is equal to a =  a * 1;

b /= 1; is equal to b =  b / 1;

Refer:Link

share|improve this answer
add comment

It's a short form. So instead of writing:

x = x + 1;

You can simply write:

x += 1;

It has the same affect.

share|improve this answer
add comment

these are shorthand operators.
these are used when you does the operation & stores result into one of the variable between them. that is you store result into one of your operand suppose example
1)x=x+y;
here you can do x+=y;
ex 2) x=x+1;
here you can do x+=1;

share|improve this answer
1  
Why the downvote? –  Jan Dvorak Nov 9 '12 at 12:54
2  
Poor explanation. Others have done much better by giving examples. –  Kevin Brydon Nov 9 '12 at 13:00
add comment

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.