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i have a cell array as below, which are dates. I am wondering how can i extract the year at the last 4 digits? Could anyone teach me how to locate the year in the string? Thank you!

'31.12.2001'
'31.12.2000'
'31.12.2004'
'31.12.2003'
'31.12.2002'
'31.12.2000'
'31.12.1999'
'31.12.1998'
'31.12.1997'
'31.12.2005'
'31.12.2004'
'31.12.2003'
'31.12.2002'
'31.12.2001'
'31.12.2000'
'31.12.1999'
'31.12.1998'
'31.12.2005'
'31.12.2004'
'31.12.2003'
'31.12.2002'
'31.12.2005'
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4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Example cell array:

A = {'31.12.2001'; '31.12.2002'; '31.12.2003'};

Apply some regular expressions:

B = regexp(A, '\d\d\d\d', 'match')
B = [B{:}];

EDIT: I never realized that matlab will "nest" an extra layer of cells until I tested this. I don't like this solution as much now that I know the second line is necessary. Here is an alternative approach that gets you the years in numeric form:

C = datevec(A, 'dd.mm.yyyy');
C = C(:, 1);

SECOND EDIT: Suprisingly, if your cell array has less than 10000 elements, the regexp approach is faster on my machine. But the output of it is another cell array (which takes up much more memory than a numeric matrix). You can use B = cell2mat(B) to get a character array instead, but this brings the two approaches to approximately equal efficiency.

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Thanks for the answer! I have heard that some ppl use 'sscanf' to do this. But when i check the help mannual for this command, i am totally lost. Could you tell me how to use 'sscanf' to handle this situation? –  Flying pig Nov 9 '12 at 13:52
    
@Flyingpig Not sure off the top of my head and I don't have access to Matlab for a while. I do know that sscanf will not operate on cell arrays, so you'll need to convert it to a character array first using char(A). However, once you've got a character array it makes much more sense to just use linear indexing as in Rody's or Dennis's answer, rather than messing around with sscanf. So I can pretty confidently say that sscanf is not the right tool for this particular job. –  Colin T Bowers Nov 10 '12 at 0:24

Just to add a fun answer, designed to take the OP to the stranger regions of Matlab:

C = char(C);
y = (D(:,7:end)-'0') * 10.^(3:-1:0).'

which is an order of magnitude faster than anything posted in the other answers :)

Or, to stay a bit closer to home,

y = cellfun(@(x)str2double(x(7:end)),C);

or, yet another regexp variation:

y = str2num(char(regexprep(C, '\d+\.\d+\.','')));
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I had to go through that second line piece by piece to work out what was going on. Pure magic. –  Colin T Bowers Nov 9 '12 at 13:46
    
It is brittle with respect to format, if I understand correctly, but nice. –  Marc Nov 12 '12 at 18:13

Assuming your matrix with dates is M or a cell array C:

In case your data is in a cell array start with

M = cell2mat(C)

Then get the relevant part

Y=M(:,end-4:end)

If required you can even make the year a number

Year = str2num(Y)
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This will only work with a character array, not a cell array. –  Colin T Bowers Nov 9 '12 at 13:16
    
Updated, now it is a bit more general and still quite robust –  Dennis Jaheruddin Nov 9 '12 at 13:42

Using regexp this will works also with dates with slightly different formats, like 1.1.2000, which can mess with you offsets

res = regexp(dates, '(?<=\d+\.\d+\.)\d+', 'match')
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