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template<typename T>
void print_size(const T& x)
{
    std::cout << sizeof(x) << '\n';
}

int main()
{
    print_size("If you timidly approach C++ as just a better C or as an object-oriented language, you are going to miss the point.");
    // prints 115
}

This prints 115 on a recent g++ compiler. So apparently, T is deduced to be an array (instead of a pointer). Is that behavior guaranteed by the standard? I was a little bit surprised, because the following code prints the size of a pointer, and I thought auto behaves exactly like template argument deduction?

int main()
{
    auto x = "If you timidly approach C++ as just a better C or as an object-oriented language, you are going to miss the point.";
    print_size(x);
    // prints 4
}
share|improve this question
1  
Don't now for the former but the latter is not unexpected. String literals ARE arrays, aren't they? –  Tomek Nov 9 '12 at 13:24
2  
For anybody reading this who doesn't know: you can't pass arrays by value (they decay to pointers) but you sure can pass a reference to an array. Here, const T& becomes a reference to an array and so sizeof gives the size of the array. –  Joseph Mansfield Nov 9 '12 at 13:31
1  
Martinho's answer covers the main question. For is the behavior guaranteed, 14.8.2.1/2: "If P is not a reference type: If A is an array type, the pointer type produced by the array-to-pointer standard conversion is used in place of A for type deduction;..." where P is the type of a template function's function parameter which can involve one or more template parameters, and A is the type of the expression used in the function call. –  aschepler Nov 9 '12 at 13:38

1 Answer 1

up vote 8 down vote accepted

auto behaves exactly1 like template argument deduction. Exactly like T!

Compare this:

template<typename T>
void print_size(T x)
{
    std::cout << sizeof(x) << '\n';
}

int main()
{
    print_size("If you timidly approach C++ as just a better C or as an object-oriented language, you are going to miss the point.");
    // prints 4
    auto x = "If you timidly approach C++ as just a better C or as an object-oriented language, you are going to miss the point.";
    print_size(x);
    // prints 4
}

With this:

template<typename T>
void print_size(const T& x)
{
    std::cout << sizeof(x) << '\n';
}

int main()
{
    print_size("If you timidly approach C++ as just a better C or as an object-oriented language, you are going to miss the point.");
    // prints 115
    const auto& x = "If you timidly approach C++ as just a better C or as an object-oriented language, you are going to miss the point.";
    print_size(x);
    // prints 115
}

1 Not quite, but this is not one of the corner cases.

share|improve this answer
    
Stupid me. Thanks for lifting the curtain :) –  FredOverflow Nov 9 '12 at 13:28
    
Because, of course, you cannot pass a C-style array as a value in C++. –  Yakk Nov 9 '12 at 13:30
    
@Yakk: Indeed, since that would break C compatibility. C didn't have references, so there was no existing behavior to break there. –  MSalters Nov 9 '12 at 15:43

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