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I have a huge project, something about 150 000 LOC of C++ code. Build time is something about 15 minutes. This project consists of many sub-projects of different sizes.

I have built separate precompiled headers for each subproject, but when I use them build time stays roughly the same. It seemed that build time is 5-10% percent less, not more.

Precompiled headers is definitely used, I use -Winvalid-pch option and I have tried to compile with -H compiler option, my precompiled headers appears in output with 'bang' symbol, that means that compiler is able to use precompiled header.

All my precompiled headers is not very large, every file is something about 50Mb. I use python script, found here to generate list of most used precompiled headers so my list of precompilation candidates is quite good.

Is there any free/open source tools for build optimization? It seemed that standard make utility doesn't have ability to measure build times of different targets. I can't find the way to get the statistics for different targets with make. I'm not talking about dependency analysis or something advanced. I just want to know for what targets most of the time was wasted.

Also, it seemed that GCC is quite inefficient in dealing with precompiled headers. I was unable to get any subproject build notably faster, maximum speedup that I get is 20% on a project that gets three minutes to build. It seemed that it is easier and cheaper to buy faster machine with solid state drive than to optimize build time on linux with GCC.

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try building with both source code and output directory residing in /dev/shm. If the build time falls dramatically then your prior build file system was the major build time contributor. –  bobah Nov 12 '12 at 7:47
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I wouldn't call that huge. More like a project between small and medium size :) –  BЈовић Nov 12 '12 at 9:55
    
@BЈовић agree, but boost compiles faster(or at least comparable) on my machine. –  Lazin Nov 12 '12 at 9:57
    
Have you tried ccache? –  PSIAlt Nov 12 '12 at 20:20
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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you want to get the most out of this feature, you need to understand how your projects can be structured to make good use of them. The best way is the slow, hard process of manually reducing build times. Sounds really stupid at first, but if all builds going forward are 5 times faster and you know how to structure your projects and dependencies moving forward -- then you realize the payoff.

You can setup a continuous integration system with your targets to measure and record your progress/improvements as your changes come in.

I have a huge project, something about 150 000 LOC of C++ code. Build time is something about 15 minutes. This project consists of many sub-projects of different sizes.

Sounds like it's doing a lot of redundant work, assuming you have a modern machine.

Also consider link times.

All my precompiled headers is not very large, every file is something about 50Mb.

That's pretty big, IMO.

I'm not talking about dependency analysis or something advanced.

Again, Continuous Integration for stats. For a build that slow, excessive dependencies are very likely the issue (unless you have many many small cpp files, or something silly like physical memory exhaustion is occurring).

I was unable to get any subproject build notably faster, maximum speedup that I get is 20%

Understand your structures and dependencies. PCHs slow down most of my projects.

It seemed that it is easier and cheaper to buy faster machine with solid state drive than to optimize build time on linux with GCC.

Chances are, that machine will not make your build times 20x faster, but fixing up your dependencies and project structures can make it 20x faster (or whatever the root of the problem ultimately is). The machine helps only so much (considering the build time for 150KSLOC).

Your build is probably CPU/memory bound.

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It looks like I have many small cpp files: % find . -name "*.cpp" | grep . -c returns 846. Also, this project consist mainly of two large static libraries, other projects is relatively small, any of them is smaller than any of this large static libraries. One of this static libraries is 700Mb in size. And code-base is very boost-oriented, it uses boost.spirit a lot, for example. –  Lazin Nov 12 '12 at 8:24
    
@Lazin hmm... about 1 file per second may not be so bad for your project's size and hardware. clang builds faster than gcc on my system -- give it a try. dependency analysis and reduction, code.google.com/p/include-what-you-use , perhaps unity builds. once the dependencies are reduced, then you can reduce what the PCHs include. also determine if you can reuse PCHs. all those cpp files will push up object file sizes and link times. in that case, you may have a lot of I/O when building. of course, all those small files will likely push up the amount of redundant compilation too. –  justin Nov 12 '12 at 8:39
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clang doesn't compile our project because of BOOST_STATIC_ASSERT and few other things. I will try this tool later, it seemed like it will be very helpful. Thanks! –  Lazin Nov 12 '12 at 10:02
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GCC build time doesn't benefit much from precompiled headers

Yes, unfortunately that's often true,

There are some experimental projects to do something better, see http://www.open-std.org/jtc1/sc22/wg21/docs/papers/2012/n3426.html and http://gcc.gnu.org/wiki/pph, but they're not usable yet.

I agree with the other answer that 15 minutes for 150KLOC is quite slow.

I've found that using the Gold linker makes a huge difference to build times, I highly recommend it.

You could also consider ccache which can help, and if you have spare cycles on other machines distcc

Avoid building on slow disks, certainly avoid networked disks. Avoid recursive invocations make, which spend more time reading makefiles and recreating dependency graphs. If you can structure your sub-project makefiles so they can all be included by a single top-level makefile, a non-recursive make will take a little longer to get started but will fly once it starts building targets. That can be a lot of work to rewrite makefiles though.

And it probably goes without saying, but build on a multicore machine and use make -j N where a good rule of thumb is that N should be twice the number of cores, or more if the compilation is I/O bound.

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I have tried ccache, recompilation is very fast now. I will try gold linker tomorow, thanks for advice. –  Lazin Nov 13 '12 at 19:58
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I use -include when generating and using the PCH to include a file that includes lots of headers. It helps, but it's still not that impressive.

Count your blessings, though: gcc appears to be several times faster than, say, MSVC, even though MSVC has better PCH support.

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