Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
Amounts = 
    Context.Ppm_TblCodeType
    .Where(bc => bc.OrganisationId == Contract.OrganisationId)
    .Select(bc => new MacroPaymentValue
    {
        Code = bc.CodeTypeCode,
        ShortName = bc.ShortDescription,
        ValueForPayment = visits
            .Where(v => v.Detail.CodeTypeCode == bc.CodeTypeCode)
            .Sum(v => v.Detail.Charge != null ? v.Detail.Charge.Value : 0)
     }).ToArray();

I am getting the exception: Local sequence cannot be used in LINQ to SQL implementations of query operators except the Contains operator.

I am guessing it is something to do with the .Sum() call... How can I modify this to avoid the exception?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This is happening because you're trying to use visits which is a local sequence in your code as part of the query and LINQ to SQL can't convert this to SQL.

Looking at your code I think you'd be better off populating ValueForPayment once you have the query result in memory. Something like:

Amounts = 
    Context.Ppm_TblCodeType
    .Where(bc => bc.OrganisationId == Contract.OrganisationId)
    .Select(bc => new MacroPaymentValue
    {
        Code = bc.CodeTypeCode,
        ShortName = bc.ShortDescription,
        CodeTypeCode = bc.CodeTypeCode,
        ValueForPayment = 0
     }).ToArray();

foreach(var bc in Amounts) 
{
    bc.ValueForPayment = visits
            .Where(v => v.Detail.CodeTypeCode == bc.CodeTypeCode)
            .Sum(v => v.Detail.Charge != null ? v.Detail.Charge.Value : 0)
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is exactly what I have done to fix the issue. Looks a lot more classical and not LINQy... but that's a small sacrifice for working and readable code. –  tigerswithguitars Nov 9 '12 at 14:37

It's throwing the exception because you're trying to use visits, not because you're calling sum(). Might help if you included the part of the code where you're creating the visits list...

Where is that coming from, and can it be queried within this same statement instead?

So something like this would work:

Context...Select(bc => new MacroPaymentValue() 
{
    //stuff
    ValueForPayment =     bc.visits.sum(...)
});

In fact, I notice at the end of this query you are forcing it ToArray(). If you are doing the same thing on the query for visits, it turns the query into a local sequence. Just getting rid of the ToArray() part on the visits query would leave you with an IQueryable that could be used in other linq queries.

So if visits does need to come from outside of TblCodeType you could just make sure not to use ToArray().

Basically, you can't use a local array in a linq to sql query (for the most part.) You can use another query in a linq to sql query though. If you call ToArray() or ToList() it will actually run the query, get the results and store those in a local sequence (an array or List depending on which you call.) If you DON'T do that, however, the query isn't run until you actually start using values. That way the query stays a query, and can be safely used in other queries.

share|improve this answer
    
Nice point... I mocked up a test app and left the visits as a IQueryable, it was a monster of a query once I did the .ToArray(), but worked a charm. I unfortunately do not have access in my real app to do this, so have marked the other answer as accepted. SO much LINQ to Learn... no pun intended. –  tigerswithguitars Nov 9 '12 at 14:39
    
Might want to work with whoever's in charge of the visits query then... there's also efficiency to worry about. One monster query is better than two separate queries. Plus I want the answer points! ;) –  Telos Nov 9 '12 at 14:57
    
Ha! Can I quote you? As good a reason as any for me to have a chat with that dev team I guess. It's the only reason I started posting questions here, I'm a competitive chap. –  tigerswithguitars Nov 9 '12 at 17:09
    
Very glad to have the points! Just wanted to chip in to say that it's very possible with LINQ to generate queries which really aren't worth the reduction in calls to the DB. I've regularly seen LINQ queries several hundred lines long - mainly using EF inheritance models - and got massive time savings just splitting it up into several calls. Still you've got to test all these things to know how best to implement a specific operation. In this case though I suspect @Telos' suggestion would be faster just based on the structure of the expression. –  James Gaunt Nov 11 '12 at 19:02

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.