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Let's say I have the following C# class that I want to be immutable. You can only set it by using the parametrized constructor.

public class InsulineInjection
{
    private InsulineInjection()
    {
        // We don't want to enable a default constructor.
    }

    public InsulineInjection(Millilitre millilitre, DateTime dateTime, string remark)
    {
        this.Remark = remark;
        this.DateTime = dateTime;
        this.Millilitre = millilitre;
    }

    public string Remark { get; private set; }
    public DateTime DateTime { get; private set; }
    public Millilitre Millilitre { get; private set; }
}

Now I would like to use an ORM to create this POCO. However, as far as I can see all .NET ORM's expects properties to be accessible and have a public constructor to be able to create this POCO. So I would have to change my POCO into this:

public class InsulineInjection
{
    public InsulineInjection()
    {
    }

    public InsulineInjection(Millilitre millilitre, DateTime dateTime, string remark)
    {
        this.Remark = remark;
        this.DateTime = dateTime;
        this.Millilitre = millilitre;
    }

    public string Remark { get; set; }
    public DateTime DateTime { get; set; }
    public Millilitre Millilitre { get; set; }
}

This however makes my POCO mutable again. Someone using it could simply change any property afterwards which is not wat I want.

As far as I can see it, I could solve this in two different ways:

  1. Write my own data access layer (or modify an orm) to be able to create correct POCO instances using the constructor I created.
  2. Create some kind of mapper. Let the ORM create simple DTO objects and use the mapper to convert the DTO objects to my POCO at the appropriate time.

I'm leaning towards solution 2. Does someone have an example on how to do this? Or does someone have a better solution than the ones I describe above?

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#2 sounds like a good possibility. A component such as automapper could come in handy for that purpose. What clients / layers of your application require your types to be immutable? –  Shan Plourde Nov 9 '12 at 14:35
    
Why do you want your database objects to be immutable? It will be just fine for querying, but how to you plan to update values in the database? I'm as much of a fan of immutable types as the next guy, but this seems like an appropriate place for a mutable type. –  Servy Nov 9 '12 at 14:35
    
This code is just a sample out of a small hobby project. It is supposed to represent that you can add a new injection. However, once it is added it can no longer be modified. Sure, I could code it in the UI, but I find it to be much more revealing if this functionality is represented in the POCO. –  Sardaukar Nov 9 '12 at 14:51
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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Many OR/Ms work as long as there is a default constructor and setters (no matter if they are public or not, they just have to exist)

So this wont work (no default constructor):

public class InsulineInjection
{
    public InsulineInjection(Millilitre millilitre, DateTime dateTime, string remark)
    {
        this.Remark = remark;
        this.DateTime = dateTime;
        _millilitre = millilitre;
    }

    public string Remark { get; set; }
    public DateTime DateTime { get; set; }
    public Millilitre Millilitre { get { return _millilitre; } }
}

or this (no setter for the last property)

public class InsulineInjection
{
    public InsulineInjection(Millilitre millilitre, DateTime dateTime, string remark)
    {
        this.Remark = remark;
        this.DateTime = dateTime;
        _millilitre = millilitre;
    }

    public string Remark { get; set; }
    public DateTime DateTime { get; set; }
    public Millilitre Millilitre { get { return _millilitre; } }
}

While this will work:

public class InsulineInjection
{
    protected InsulineInjection()
    {
        // works with many OR/Ms
    }

    public InsulineInjection(Millilitre millilitre, DateTime dateTime, string remark)
    {
        this.Remark = remark;
        this.DateTime = dateTime;
        this.Millilitre = millilitre;
    }

    public string Remark { get; private set; }
    public DateTime DateTime { get; private set; }
    public Millilitre Millilitre { get; private set; }
}
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Thanks, I wasn't aware that the last example could work with an OR/M. –  Sardaukar Nov 9 '12 at 14:53
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Not all .NET ORMs require public property access to write data. NHibernate supports writing data to private fields or setters. However, you need to follow one of allowed naming conventions for fields so that it can deduce field name from the property name.

Check out NHibernate documentation about property mapping, particularly take a look at tables Table 5.1. Access Strategies and Table 5.2. Naming Strategies. Look at nosetter access strategy and pick naming strategy which fits your coding style.

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To avoid the constructor being used by your own code, you can use the Obsolete attribute

[Obsolete("Default constructor only here for the ORM", true)]
public InsulineInjection() {}

Passing true in the attribute will yield a compiler error if you actually call this constructor.

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You also need to have the setters for use by the ORM, and that's what he wants to not expose. –  Servy Nov 9 '12 at 14:36
    
See the other answers for that –  jeroenh Nov 9 '12 at 14:39
    
When you post an answer to a question you should answer the question and not rely on other answers to actually answer the question. If you just want to add a bit to an existing answer then you should post a comment to one of those answers. –  Servy Nov 9 '12 at 14:42
    
I just thought to add a useful tip that seemed too long for a comment. Sorry it doesn't fit your high standards. Is there a rule somewhere that says you can't add partial answers here? –  jeroenh Nov 9 '12 at 17:24
    
I would think that common sense would dictate that when posting an answer to a question you should actually answer the question. –  Servy Nov 9 '12 at 17:29
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This scenario is handled natively by dapper-dot-net.

You just need the order and type of the query fields to match the order and type of the constructor arguments. So for your class the query would be something like:

select millilitre, 
    ,dateTime
    ,remark
from injections

Unfortunately dapper won't know how to convert something from decimal to millilitre.

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