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I am a shell scripting newbie trying to understand some code, but there are some lines that are too complexe for me. The piece of code I'm talking about can be found here: https://gist.github.com/447191 It's purpose is to start, stop and restart a server. That's pretty standard stuff, so it's worth taking some time to understand it. I commented those lines where I am unsure about the meaning or that I completely don't understand, hoping that somone could give me some explanation.

    #!/bin/bash
    #
    BASE=/tmp
    PID=$BASE/app.pid
    LOG=$BASE/app.log
    ERROR=$BASE/app-error.log

    PORT=11211
    LISTEN_IP='0.0.0.0'
    MEM_SIZE=4
    CMD='memcached'
# Does this mean, that the COMMAND variable can adopt different values, depending on
# what is entered as parameter? "memcached" is chosen by default, port, ip address and 
# memory size are options, but what is -v?
    COMMAND="$CMD -p $PORT -l $LISTEN_IP -m $MEM_SIZE -v"

    USR=user

    status() {
        echo
    echo "==== Status"

        if [ -f $PID ]
        then
    echo
    echo "Pid file: $( cat $PID ) [$PID]"
            echo
# ps -ef: Display uid, pid, parent pid, recent CPU usage, process start time, 
# controling tty, elapsed CPU usage, and the associated command of all other processes
# that are owned by other users.
# The rest of this line I don't understand, especially grep -v grep
    ps -ef | grep -v grep | grep $( cat $PID )
        else
    echo
    echo "No Pid file"
        fi
    }

    start() {
        if [ -f $PID ]
        then
    echo
    echo "Already started. PID: [$( cat $PID )]"
        else
    echo "==== Start"
# Lock file that indicates that no 2nd instance should be started
            touch $PID
# COMMAND is called as background process and ignores SIGHUP signal, writes it's
# output to the LOG file. 
            if nohup $COMMAND >>$LOG 2>&1 &
# The pid of the last background is saved in the PID file
            then echo $! >$PID
                 echo "Done."
                 echo "$(date '+%Y-%m-%d %X'): START" >>$LOG
            else echo "Error... "
                 /bin/rm $PID
            fi
    fi
    }
# I don't understand this function :-(    
    kill_cmd() {
        SIGNAL=""; MSG="Killing "
        while true
    do
    LIST=`ps -ef | grep -v grep | grep $CMD | grep -w $USR | awk '{print $2}'`
            if [ "$LIST" ]
            then
    echo; echo "$MSG $LIST" ; echo
    echo $LIST | xargs kill $SIGNAL
# Why this sleep command?
                sleep 2
                SIGNAL="-9" ; MSG="Killing $SIGNAL"
                if [ -f $PID ]
                then
                    /bin/rm $PID
                fi
    else
    echo; echo "All killed..." ; echo
    break
    fi
    done
    }

    stop() {
        echo "==== Stop"

        if [ -f $PID ]
        then
    if kill $( cat $PID )
            then echo "Done."
                 echo "$(date '+%Y-%m-%d %X'): STOP" >>$LOG
            fi
            /bin/rm $PID
            kill_cmd
        else
    echo "No pid file. Already stopped?"
        fi
    }

    case "$1" in
        'start')
                start
                ;;
        'stop')
                stop
                ;;
        'restart')
                stop ; echo "Sleeping..."; sleep 1 ;
                start
                ;;
        'status')
                status
                ;;
        *)
                echo
    echo "Usage: $0 { start | stop | restart | status }"
                echo
    exit 1
                ;;
    esac

    exit 0
share|improve this question
    
Ah, ps | grep -v grep. This is a common idiom. That first ps ...grep (show "full" output for a single pid) is more efficiently written ps -f $(cat $PID). The ps ... awk (show pids for a certain user) is more efficiently written as ps -u $USR -o pid=. –  pilcrow Nov 9 '12 at 16:29

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

1) COMMAND="$CMD -p $PORT -l $LISTEN_IP -m $MEM_SIZE -v"-v in Unix tradition very often is a shortcut for --verbose. All those dollar signs are variable expansion (their text values are inserted into the string assigned to new variable COMMAND).

2) ps -ef | grep -v grep | grep $( cat $PID ) - it's a pipe: ps redirects its output to grep which outputs to another grep and the end result is printed to the standard output. grep -v grep means "take all lines that do not contain 'grep'" (grep itself is a process, so you need to exclude it from output of ps). $( $command ) is a way to run command and insert its standard output into this place of script (in this case: cat $PID will show contents of file with name $PID).

3) kill_cmd. This function is an endless loop trying to kill the LIST of 'memcached' processes' PIDs. First, it tries to send TERM signal (politely asking each process in $LIST to quit, saving its work and shutting down correctly), gives them 2 seconds (sleep 2) to do their shutdown job and then tries to make sure that all processes are killed using signal KILL (-9), which slays the process immediately using OS facilities: if a process has not done its shutdown work in 2 seconds, it's considered hung). If slaying with kill -9 was successful, it removes the PID file and quits the loop.

ps -ef | grep -v grep | grep $CMD | grep -w $USR | awk '{print $2}' prints all PIDs of processes with name $CMD ('memcached') and user $USR ('user'). -w option of grep means 'the Whole word only' (this excludes situations where the sought name is a part of another process name, like 'fakememcached'). awk is a little interpreter most often used to take a word number N from every line of input (you can consider it a selector for a column of a text table). In this case, it prints every second word in ps output lines, that means every PID.

If you have any other questions, I'll add answers below.

share|improve this answer

Here is an explanation of the pieces of code you do not understand:

1.

# Does this mean, that the COMMAND variable can adopt different values, depending on
# what is entered as parameter? "memcached" is chosen by default, port, ip address and 
# memory size are options, but what is -v?
    COMMAND="$CMD -p $PORT -l $LISTEN_IP -m $MEM_SIZE -v"

In the man, near -v:

$ man memcached
...
 -v     Be verbose during the event loop; print out errors and warnings.
...

2.

# ps -ef: Display uid, pid, parent pid, recent CPU usage, process start time, 
# controling tty, elapsed CPU usage, and the associated command of all other processes
# that are owned by other users.
# The rest of this line I don't understand, especially grep -v grep
ps -ef | grep -v grep | grep $( cat $PID )

Print all processes details (ps -ef), exclude the line with grep (grep -v grep) (since you are running grep it will display itself in the process list) and filter by the text found in the file named $PID (/tmp/app.pid) (grep $( cat $PID )).

3.

# I don't understand this function :-(    
    kill_cmd() {
        SIGNAL=""; MSG="Killing "
        while true
    do
    ## create a list with all the pid numbers filtered by command (memcached) and user ($USR)
    LIST=`ps -ef | grep -v grep | grep $CMD | grep -w $USR | awk '{print $2}'`
    ## if $LIST is not empty... proceed
            if [ "$LIST" ]
            then
    echo; echo "$MSG $LIST" ; echo
    ## kill all the processes in the $LIST (xargs will get the list from the pipe and put it at the end of the kill command; something like this < kill $SIGNAL $LIST > )
    echo $LIST | xargs kill $SIGNAL
# Why this sleep command?
## some processes might take one or two seconds to perish
                sleep 2
                SIGNAL="-9" ; MSG="Killing $SIGNAL"
                ## if the file $PID still exists, delete it
                if [ -f $PID ]
                then
                    /bin/rm $PID
                fi
    ## if list is empty
    else
    echo; echo "All killed..." ; echo
    ## get out of the while loop
    break
    fi
    done
    }

This function will kill all the processes related to memcached slowly and painfully (actually quite the opposite). Above are the explanations.

share|improve this answer

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