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I have 2 resource managing classes DeviceContext and OpenGLContext both are members of class DisplayOpenGL. The resource lifetimes are tied to DisplayOpenGL. Initialization looks like this (pseudo code):

DeviceContext m_device = DeviceContext(hwnd);
m_device.SetPixelFormat();
OpenGLContext m_opengl = OpenGLContext(m_device);

The problem is the call to SetPixelFormat(), since I can't do that in the initializer list of the DisplayOpenGL c'tor:

class DisplayOpenGL {
public:
    DisplayOpenGL(HWND hwnd)
    : m_device(hwnd),
      // <- Must call m_device.SetPixelFormat here ->
      m_opengl(m_device) { };
private:
    DeviceContext m_device;
    OpenGLContext m_opengl;
};

Solutions that I can see:

  • Inserting m_dummy(m_device.SetPixelFormat()) - Won't work as SetPixelFormat() has no retval. (should you do this if it had a retval?)
  • Use unique_ptr<OpenGLContext> m_opengl; instead of OpenGLContext m_opengl;.
    Then initialize as m_opengl(), call SetPixelFormat() in the c'tor body and use m_opengl.reset(new OpenGLContext);
  • Call SetPixelFormat() from DeviceContext c'tor

Which of these solutions is preferable and why? Anything I am missing?

I'm using Visual Studio 2010 Express on Windows, if it matters.

Edit: I'm mostly interested in the tradeoffs involved in deciding for one of these methods.

  • m_dummy() doesn't work and seems inelegant even if it would
  • unique_ptr<X> is interesting to me - when would I use it instead of a "normal" X m_x member? The two methods seem to be functionally more or less equivalent, except for the initialization issues.
  • Calling SetPixelFormat() from DeviceContext c'tor certainly works but feels unclean to me. DeviceContext should manage the resource and enable its use, not impose some random pixel format policy on users.
  • stijn's InitDev() looks like the cleanest solution.

Do I pretty much always want a smart pointer based solution in such cases anyway?

share|improve this question
    
This seems like the kind of case where a static factory function may be more useful than a constructor. – cdhowie Nov 9 '12 at 15:45
    
seems to me like your third solution would work. Is there some reason you have chosen not to? Also, why not use a library like GLFW to load your openGL context? – Eric B Nov 9 '12 at 15:47
    
I was not aware of GLFW when I started. Will have a look, thanks. – Christian Aichinger Nov 9 '12 at 17:32
    
Another solution is to use the comma operator: stackoverflow.com/a/13314512/6210 – MSN Nov 9 '12 at 21:34
up vote 8 down vote accepted

Comma operator to the rescue! An expression (a, b) will evaluate a first, then b.

class DisplayOpenGL {
public:
    DisplayOpenGL(HWND hwnd)
    : m_device(hwnd),
      m_opengl((m_device.SetPixelFormat(), m_device)) { };
private:
    DeviceContext m_device;
    OpenGLContext m_opengl;
};
share|improve this answer

If OpenGLContext has a 0 argument constructor and copy constructor you can change your constructor to

DisplayOpenGL(HWND hwnd)
: m_device(hwnd)
{
    m_device.SetPixelFormat();
    m_opengl = OpenGLContext(m_device);
};

unique_ptr is generally used when you want to make one of the members optional or "nullable," which you may or may not want to do here.

share|improve this answer

Using uniqe_ptr for both seems appropriate here: you can forward declare DeviceContext and OpenGLContext, instead of including their headers, which is a good thing). Then this works:

class DisplayOpenGL
{
public:
  DisplayOpenGL( HWND h );
private:
  unique_ptr<DeviceContext> m_device;
  unique_ptr<OpenGLContext> m_opengl;
};

namespace
{
  DeviceContext* InitDev( HWND h )
  {
    DeviceContext* p = new DeviceContext( h );
    p->SetPixelFormat();
    return p;
  }
}

DisplayOpenGL::DisplayOpenGL( HWND h ):
  m_device( InitDev( h ) ),
  m_opengl( new OpenGLContext( *m_device ) )
{
}

If you can use c++11 you can replace InitDev() with a lambda.

share|improve this answer

Do I pretty much always want a smart pointer based solution in such cases anyway?

No. Avoid this unnecessary complication.

Two immediate approaches which have not been mentioned:

Approach A:

The clean way.

Create a little container object for m_device's storage which calls SetPixelFormat() in the constructor. Then replace DisplayOpenGL ::m_device with an instance of that type. Initialization order obtained, and the intent is quite clear. Illustration:

class DisplayOpenGL {
public:
    DisplayOpenGL(HWND hwnd)
        : m_device(hwnd),
            m_opengl(m_device) { }
private:
    class t_DeviceContext {
    public:
        t_DeviceContext(HWND hwnd) : m_device(hwnd) {
            this->m_device.SetPixelFormat();
        }
        // ...
    private:
        DeviceContext m_device;
    };
private:
    t_DeviceContext m_device;
    OpenGLContext m_opengl;
};

Approach B:

The quick & dirty way. You can use a static function in this case:

class DisplayOpenGL {
public:
    DisplayOpenGL(HWND hwnd)
    : m_device(hwnd),
      m_opengl(InitializeDevice(m_device)) { }
private:
    // document why it must happen this way here
    static DeviceContext& InitializeDevice(DeviceContext& pDevice) {
      pDevice.SetPixelFormat();
      return pDevice;
    }
private:
    DeviceContext m_device;
    OpenGLContext m_opengl;
};
share|improve this answer

First of all, you're doing it wrong. :-) It is very poor practice to do complex things in constructors. Ever. Make those operations functions on a helper object that must be passed into the constructor instead. Better is to construct your complex objects outside your class and pass them in fully created, that way if you need to pass them to other classes, you can do so into THEIR constructors at the same time as well. Plus that way you have a chance of detecting errors, adding sensible logging, etc.

class OpenGLInitialization
{
public:
    OpenGLInitialization(HWND hwnd)
        : mDevice(hwnd) {}
    void                 SetPixelFormat  (void)       { mDevice.SetPixelFormat(); }
    DeviceContext const &GetDeviceContext(void) const { return mDevice; }
private:
    DeviceContext mDevice;
};        

class DisplayOpenGL 
{
public:
    DisplayOpenGL(OpenGLInitialization const &ogli)
    : mOGLI(ogli),
      mOpenGL(ogli.GetDeviceContext())
      {}
private:
    OpenGLInitialization mOGLI;
    OpenGLContext mOpenGL;
};
share|improve this answer

If it belongs to DeviceContext (and it seems so from your code), call it from DeviceContext c'tor.

share|improve this answer

Combine the Comma operator with a IIFE (Immediately-Invoked Function Expression), which lets you define variables and other complex stuff unavailable just with the comma operator:

struct DisplayOpenGL {
    DisplayOpenGL(HWND hwnd)
        : m_device(hwnd)
        , opengl(([&] {
            m_device.SetPixelFormat();
        }(), m_device))
    DeviceContext m_device;
    OpenGLContext m_opengl;
};
share|improve this answer

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