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I have a use case where a Object is present with a string having a condition for evaluation against another object's attributes. E.g. StudentEvaluator has condition

student.pastScore>70 && student.currentScore>90 && student.sportsParticipation=true

And Student object has the respective attributes.

E.g. pastScore, currentScore and sportsParticipation

Now the StudentEvaluator condition string is created at runtime and has to evaluated for true or false. There are a number of StudentEvaluators running in parallel with different conditions. Now the StudentEvaluator accepts a student argument in its evaluating function and evaluates the condition. i.e.

public Class StudentEvaluator{

String condition;

  public StudentEvaluator(String condition){
    this.condition = condition;
  }

  evaluate(Student student){
    <<Code>>
  }

}

What would be the most efficient way of evaluation? Any out of the box ideas are welcome! :)

share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Done this in the past. You have multiple options

  1. OGNL
  2. MVEL - More performant that OGNL. Has support for logical and conditional operators.
  3. SpEL - Spring Expression Language - My preference.
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, But the thing is this is just a POC for a use case where around 10000 StudentEvaluators would have their respective conditions. So is this scalable to that level? Can this is accomplished by a better approach? So was asking for an approach to deal with this :) – Sangram Mohite Nov 10 '12 at 11:49
    
All the three scale pretty well beyond 100,000 (this was roughly my batch size) records. Make sure you pre-parse the expressions and cache them. – Pangea Nov 10 '12 at 23:05

If the properties follow the JavaBeans standard (i.e. they are fields with getters and setters), then you can use technologies like Apache Commons / BeanUtils.

Sample code:

Student student = // some student
Map<String, Object> studentProperties = BeanUtils.describe(student);
Integer currentScore = studentProperties.get("currentScore"); // etc.
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, But the thing is this is just a POC for a use case where around 10000 StudentEvaluators would have their respective conditions. So is this scalable to that level? Can this is accomplished by a better approach? So was asking for an approach to deal with this :) – Sangram Mohite Nov 10 '12 at 11:48

It's not simple, actually you need an expression parser language, maybe you could use an existing solution, i.e. jexel

share|improve this answer
    
Ok ..Can you comment on how efficient it is? – Sangram Mohite Nov 9 '12 at 16:12
    
@Pangea provided you with even more alternative solutions, what do you mean by efficient? Parsing expressions is a common task and can be accomplished very efficiently, it should not be an issue. – remigio Nov 9 '12 at 16:22
    
Ok. Thanks. But the thing is this is just a POC for a use case where around 10000 StudentEvaluators would have their respective conditions. So was asking for an approach to deal with this :) – Sangram Mohite Nov 10 '12 at 11:48
    
Given that the conditions are expressed by a String object I don't think there would be a more efficient solution than using an expression parser. Otherwise, you should represent the conditions with a more complex data structure that directly contains the tree structure of the expressions to evaluate with the logical clauses at each node. That way you would make it with no parsing phase, but you would pay in term of more complex code to develop. – remigio Nov 10 '12 at 14:29

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